iPhone 4 - highest pixel density of ANY screen?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Doju, Jun 8, 2010.

  1. Doju macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2008
    #1
    Apple's doing all this bragging (rightfully so) that it's the highest pixel density in any phone.

    As screens get bigger pixel densities only lessen, so what is any other screen with a higher pixel density? I can't think of one, so why would Apple not tote "highest resolution screen on the planet"? Sounds a lot more impressive, even though this new screen sounds awing.
     
  2. Chaszmyr macrumors 601

    Chaszmyr

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    #2
    As you pointed out, as screens get bigger, pixel density tends to get smaller. The fact that Apple doesn't call it the highest density screen on the planet suggests there exist higher density screens, and they are probably smaller, and therefore used for things you probably don't care much about.

    I know that there exist projectors that have an extremely high pixel density LCDs, but I don't know if those count as "screens."
     
  3. moopf macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #3
    Resolution and density are really two different things, at least for most people when they think about displays. Most people think of resolution as 'x pixels by y pixels'. And I bet most people had ever even thought about pixel density until yesterday :) There's a page on Wikipedia that lists a whole load of pixel densities:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_displays_by_pixel_density

    On there, only the Sony X1 has a density over 300, and still not as high as the iPhone 4 screen. Here's a slashgear article from 2008 with a 2" Casio display with 546 pixels per inch:

    http://www.slashgear.com/casios-qua...2-inch-lcd-has-highest-pixel-density-2517310/

    Doubt there's much in consumer mass production that's of the same density of the iPhone 4 though currently.
     
  4. wikoogle macrumors 6502a

    wikoogle

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    #4
    They should tout that it has the highest pixel density of any consumer product (or mass market product).


    I'm sure there's higher pixel densities at the CIA or the Pentagon (maybe screens displaying sattelite images and things like that), but not for consumer products.
     
  5. Faxmonkey macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2010
    #5
    The highest is the LG LU1400 with 333 pixels per inch, but it's I think it's only sold in Korea or Japan or some other Asian Market.

    There are also prototypes of the LG GW990 floating around. It would have been even higher res was but it was canceled. I suspect because it was supposed to be based on an operating system that didn't really pan out . . .

    But anyways, there have been at least 3 other mass market phones that had a "retina display" by Apple's 300+ definition, but 326 is the second highest pixel density on a phone screen that I'm aware of.
     
  6. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2007
    Location:
    First university coding class = 46 years ago
    #6
    Also note that the LU1400 came out in late 2008, a year and a half ago.

    Then there was the Toshiba G900 in 2007 with 313 PPI, making it a "300dpi print quality" phone three years before the iPhone 4.

    For "retina displays" (going by Apple's new marketing angle-subtended eye resolution criterion), simply hold a lot of phones a few inches further away from your face and they will qualify as well.

    The highest PPI display I can find was a half inch wide LCD made back in 2008 with over 2,200 PPI, meant for head gear.

    In any case, the iPhone 4 has a very nice display. That's true even if it's not the highest resolution ever made, or used in a phone.

    Its design will be remembered in a computing historical sense not because of its high resolution, but because it was designed specifically as a multiple of the older display size, in order to allow older apps to be used without rewriting them to support resolution independence. In other words, in this case hardware was used to shortcircuit any need for immediate software upgrades.

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