iphone 5 battery replacement not charging

Discussion in 'iPhone Tips, Help and Troubleshooting' started by scuberman, May 24, 2014.

  1. scuberman macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 24, 2014
    #1
    Today, I had my the battery in my iphone replace today. (frasinelli boys) The phone showed the phone was charging but it never got above 3%. Eventually it died. Now when it goes to charge, the apple icon will kick on and then the screen goes black. It never shows the empty battery with the lightening bolt.

    My question is, I read somewhere that there may be a compatibility issue with the latest IOs version. Is this true or could there be another issue? BTW this is the second time I had a battery put in. The first time (CPR) tech could not even get the battery to charge. Thought it may have been a bad battery so he put the old one back in, at least it charged although the old battery will not hold a charge.
     
  2. kage207 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    #2
    Have you done a hard reboot? Like hold the sleep and home buttons?
     
  3. scuberman thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 24, 2014
    #3
    I did and it came up with the pic of the cord and the I tunes symbol.

    Today I returned back to the fanelli boys and the put in another battery. This time it worked. I guess I ran into two bad batteries
     
  4. magilla macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2013
    #4
    Do you know if the (two failed) replacement batteries were OEMs or were they "matched to spec" models from any other manufacturer? Battery replacement in small electronics such as phones, is notoriously quirky with regards to matching (or exceeding) the OEM requirements. Sometimes, "close enough" just ain't good enough.
     
  5. magilla macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2013
    #5
    That wouldn't have done anything with a "junk" battery put in the OP's phone. Countless MILLIONS of "junk" batteries are flooding the market, whether they be "new" batteries made in third-world back room factories or "reconditioned/recycled" batteries (by far the largest part of the re-furb market) they're out there waiting to be installed. With the smartphone market flooded to the bursting point now and, with the shortened overall battery life expectancy due to continuous daily use, you can only expect the after-market battery problems to increase exponentially as more and more users find the need to replace their batteries and go to "non-authorized" repair centers for replacement batteries. Caveat emptor!
     

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