iPhone 6 apple logo material

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by robxxx, Oct 25, 2014.

  1. robxxx macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2012
    #1
    was it ever confirmed whether this is made from a liquid metal technologies alloy? there was a lot of speculation leading up to the release and then it just never seemed to come up again.

    google isn't giving me much to go off & this has always been of interest to me.
     
  2. TommyA6 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    #2
    It's stainless steel.
     
  3. TruckdriverSean macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Location:
    Texas, US
    #3
    Liquid metal is just MIM technology right?

    That's just a manufacturing process, NOT a material type. A cool process to be sure, but not particularly strong or durable. Never understood the fixation with it other than the fact that people don't know what it is.

    MIM. (Metal Injected Molding)
     
  4. jfyrfytr25 macrumors 6502a

    jfyrfytr25

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    #4
    Actually no. Liquid metal refers to a special alloy. It is a patented material that apple owns.

    http://liquidmetal.com
     
  5. cambookpro macrumors 603

    cambookpro

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2010
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #5
    It's a special alloy (usually zirconium, beryllium, titanium, copper and nickel, though I think other variants marketed as LM also can have aluminium and niobium in) that has very high tensile strength, is corrosion resistant, has an excellent strength to weight ratio, is hard wearing and collides elastically. Generally, all these properties aren't found in one material which makes LM very useful for certain applications.

    It's low melting points mean that is can be moulded and casted very easily, which is why I assume it gets the name 'Liquidmetal', although, of course, it's a solid at RTP.

    However, ostensibly work is being done on iron alloys which combine most of these properties with a better strength to weight ratio and, crucially, a cheaper price. It remains to be seen if LM can actually be in use on a large scale before new, cheaper alloys come along.
     

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