iPhone iPhone 6: Apple still provide iOS 12 Security Updates?

Dezlboy

macrumors regular
Original poster
Sep 10, 2008
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iOS 13 is limited to iPhone 6s and newer. Will Apple provide security updates to iPhones limited to iOS 12? If not, how concerned should one be? FWIW: Holding off purchase until (rumored) "cheap" iPhone SE (?) in Spring.

A search came up with old threads from the Spring, with varying replies....so "reposted" similar question.....thanks.
 
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C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
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The key word is "typically." It has happened occasionally, for both Mac and iOS. It's a matter of the seriousness of the threat that's been uncovered.
Yes, there's certainly possiblity of something like that. In case of iOS at least it's more along the lines of "rarely" I'd say than "occasionally".
 
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Freakonomics101

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Nov 6, 2014
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If Apple notices something of concern, it will be addressed. Support has come to a stop but just like what happened with iOS 10 and 9 a bit ago, could receive an update for security issues. Small chance, but still.
 

MrUNIMOG

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Sep 23, 2014
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If Apple notices something of concern, it will be addressed. Support has come to a stop but just like what happened with iOS 10 and 9 a bit ago, could receive an update for security issues. Small chance, but still.
I think in the past when that happened, it usually was to fix functionality issues (like GPS/time recently with iOS 9.3.5 and 10.3.4) rather than security issues.
Security flaws don't stop a device from working properly, those usually aren't fixed after a new iOS release is out, unlike macOS.
 
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ApfelKuchen

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Aug 28, 2012
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Yes, there's certainly possiblity of something like that. In case of iOS at least it's more along the lines of "rarely" I'd say than "occasionally".
Since "rare" and "occasionally" are not mutually exclusive (and neither can be pinned down to a specific quantity), you could say "Upon rare occasion" and I wouldn't quibble.

I'm sure we would also find agreement on the statement, "It could happen, but I wouldn't count on it."

To a large degree, this comes down to a basic truth; those seeking to find exploits tend to focus on the large, relatively under-exploited targets. For the most part an older OS ceases to be a target, and the newer features of a new OS receive the most scrutiny.

When Mac OS was around 2% of the installed desktop user base, it didn't get a whole lot of hacker/researcher attention. Now that it's closer to 10%, it gets much more attention. (And the much larger distribution of iOS has tended to make all Apple products a bigger target for researchers.) Once a new version of an OS has passed through a full year of active scrutiny, updates, and patches, for the most part the need to make further patches is diminished. However, when a serious exploit is encountered that affects multiple generations of the OS... security updates are still pushed out.
 
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C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
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Since "rare" and "occasionally" are not mutually exclusive (and neither can be pinned down to a specific quantity), you could say "Upon rare occasion" and I wouldn't quibble.

I'm sure we would also find agreement on the statement, "It could happen, but I wouldn't count on it."

To a large degree, this comes down to a basic truth; those seeking to find exploits tend to focus on the large, relatively under-exploited targets. For the most part an older OS ceases to be a target, and the newer features of a new OS receive the most scrutiny.

When Mac OS was around 2% of the installed desktop user base, it didn't get a whole lot of hacker/researcher attention. Now that it's closer to 10%, it gets much more attention. (And the much larger distribution of iOS has tended to make all Apple products a bigger target for researchers.) Once a new version of an OS has passed through a full year of active scrutiny, updates, and patches, for the most part the need to make further patches is diminished. However, when a serious exploit is encountered that affects multiple generations of the OS... security updates are still pushed out.
Sure, one can fit in with the other, like a “few” can be part of “some”. That said, each one conveys a particular sense of the word that makes a difference.
- - Post merged: - -

I'm sure we would also find agreement on the statement, "It could happen, but I wouldn't count on it."
Sure, that would be another way of conveying it.
 

Thomas Veil

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Feb 14, 2004
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Basic question, but I’ve downgraded back to 12.4.1. To do that I had to download an IPSW file to install.

Let’s say I try to give iOS 13 another chance in the future. Even if I keep that IPSW file, after Apple stops signing that release I won’t be able to downgrade again, will I?