iPhone 6 photo from December

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by SeilerBird, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. SeilerBird macrumors regular

    SeilerBird

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    Nov 12, 2014
    #1
  2. jabingla2810 macrumors 68020

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    Oct 15, 2008
    #3
    As decent as the iPhone camera is, let's hope you never need to zoom in on anything.
     
  3. SeilerBird thread starter macrumors regular

    SeilerBird

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    Nov 12, 2014
    #4
    I spent ten years living full time in my RV traveling the US visiting all the National Parks and I took a zillion photos with telephoto lenses. I have a collection of almost 300 different bird species photos. All the time I was wandering around with a telephoto lens on my camera and that made it impossible to take wide angle photos since I refuse to switch lenses in the field. Now I have just the opposite situation, a wide angle with no telephoto. But I rarely miss the telephoto lens.

    I sold all my DSLR stuff right after buying the iPhone but I kept my 50x zoom Fuji bridge camera for rocket launches and concerts. It hasn't been out of the case since I got the iPhone two months ago. Every camera from a pinhole to Hubble has limitations on what it can and cannot photograph. No matter what camera you have with you there will always be missed opportunities. Rather than cry about missed photo opportunities I love my iPhone.
     
  4. JWorld127 macrumors 6502

    JWorld127

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    #5
    Wow those are great pics! Are those just set on HDR and then just uploaded on Picasa?
     
  5. meistervu macrumors 65816

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    Jul 24, 2008
    #6
    Well said.
     
  6. SeilerBird thread starter macrumors regular

    SeilerBird

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    Nov 12, 2014
    #7
    Thanks for the kind words.

    I have HDR set on auto. I take a whole lot of photos and at the beginning of the month download them to my Windows laptop, review them in Lightroom and choose my favorite 30 or so photos and then upload them with the Picasa web site.

    When I was shooting with a DSLR I had the same workflow, however since I shot RAW I had to post process every shot. With the iPhone they come out so good right out of the camera I have little to do in the way of post processing, usually only cropping an occasional photo. I am amazed at the out of camera jpgs iPhone produces.
     
  7. JWorld127 macrumors 6502

    JWorld127

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    Jan 12, 2013
    #8
    I agree the camera jpg the iPhone 6 produces mated with that beautiful screen gives breath taking results. My parents who are pretty old even comment on how vivid and great the pictures appear on the phone when ever we have a family gathering. I really think Apple knocked it out of the park with this phones camera abilities.
     
  8. geoff5093 macrumors 68000

    geoff5093

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    Sep 16, 2014
    Location:
    Dover, NH
    #9
    Those are great photos!

    However, if you were using a DSLR in automatic mode I can see why you'd be fine selling it and using your iPhone. The iPhone doesn't give you manual controls of aperture, exposure, etc. So you wouldn't be able to choose on the fly if you want an entire seen in focus, or use a wide aperture lens for some smooth bokeh, you couldn't take a 20 second exposure of the night sky while manually focusing on the stars, you can't shoot sports due to the wide angle lens and poor ISO performance compared to a DSLR, and as already mentioned you can't zoom in on anything, so any sort of close up requires you to get right up to the object, which isn't always possible (i.e. a zoo).

    I do agree though, it's whatever is best for each individual. The best camera is the one you have on you.
     
  9. Menel macrumors 603

    Menel

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    Location:
    ATL
    #10
    This defies all logic.
    Why did you even have an interchangeable lens camera?
     
  10. SeilerBird thread starter macrumors regular

    SeilerBird

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    Nov 12, 2014
    #11
    Changing lenses in the field is a huge problem. It allows dust to get into the camera body and land on the sensor. It costs about $50 to get your sensor cleaned.

    If you go to my web site and look around you will see that I have used my DSLRs a lot and I got great results, plus I never had to fight the dust on the sensor problem. But the main reason I got a DSLR was because I was working at the Grand Canyon photographing Condors and a DSLR was mandatory for that kind of work. Now I am living in Florida and no longer photographing birds every day so the need for a DSLR has decreased to zero.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/108464110929132780547/MyPortfolio?authuser=0&feat=directlink
     
  11. geoff5093 macrumors 68000

    geoff5093

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    Dover, NH
    #12
    That really depends. If you are experienced you can swap lenses within 1-2 seconds, while keeping the camera sensor exposed for as little of that time as possible. I've swapped lenses at sporting events, in rain, on a trail, everywhere.

    The entire point of an interchangeable lens camera is so you can swap lenses to get the shot when you need to, not to get by with just one lens when out. If you are really worried, do what lots of other photographers do and get a second body.
     
  12. SeilerBird thread starter macrumors regular

    SeilerBird

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    Nov 12, 2014
    #13
    That is not the reason interchangeable lenses were invented. But then that causes the problem of carrying around all the lenses. I carry nothing extra when I go hiking. I am in my 60s and weight is an issue since I can hike 5 to 10 miles a day when out shooting.
     
  13. meistervu macrumors 65816

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    #14
    Well, you have to invest in some good lenses if you want nice bokeh from an SLR. They are pretty expensive. Then you have to learn how to use the lenses properly. Most SLR shooters take better photos with an iPhone because the learning curve is shorter.

    You can choose focus point and lock exposure with the iPhone. Tap on the area where you want the focus to be, and drag a slider to control the exposure. You can also get pretty nice bokeh with a shallow depth of field if four foreground subject is close enough. Of course you don't get any where near the level of control as with an SLR and good lenses, but for most shooters, there is so much they can do with an iPhone camera that they haven't use it to its full potential.

    My advice to someone who what to take better photos is learn how to use what they have first before making excuses about the equipment. Focus on what it can do instead of what it cannot do.
     
  14. SeilerBird thread starter macrumors regular

    SeilerBird

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    Nov 12, 2014
    #15
    Amen brother! Most people mistakenly think that by buying a more expensive camera or lens that they will take better photos. The most important part of a camera is located 12 inches behind the lens.
     
  15. geoff5093 macrumors 68000

    geoff5093

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    Sep 16, 2014
    Location:
    Dover, NH
    #16
    Everyone is different, I know if I'm going out with the intent to photograph I'll use my camera bag as my backpack and pack 1-2 lenses and filters with me.

    Exactly, and those people wonder why their brand new $2K DSLR doesn't take good photos. Using a DSLR on auto or using manual without the proper knowledge is bound to cause those results.
     

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