Iphone 6 slow Motion

bensweet108

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 10, 2014
15
0
For some weird reason I can't figure out how to get the full quality slow motion videos on my laptop from my phone.

Can't send full rez and can't find it through iTunes either…

Anyone knows?

Merci
 

BvizioN

macrumors 601
Mar 16, 2012
4,955
2,750
Manchester, UK
When you connect your phone to a PC, does it ask you to trust the device on PC? If you choose yes, then I think you can just drag and drop the media from your iPhone to a PC and they should have the original quality.

There could be other easier ways to do it that am not aware.
 

Newtons Apple

Suspended
Mar 12, 2014
22,764
14,920
Jacksonville, Florida
For some weird reason I can't figure out how to get the full quality slow motion videos on my laptop from my phone.

Can't send full rez and can't find it through iTunes either…

Anyone knows?

Merci
I have not used the slow motion function on the iPhone but am willing to be that you can not use the higher quality due to hardware limitations. To record so many frames a second, the amount of resolution has got to be reduced.
 

BvizioN

macrumors 601
Mar 16, 2012
4,955
2,750
Manchester, UK
I have not used the slow motion function on the iPhone but am willing to be that you can not use the higher quality due to hardware limitations. To record so many frames a second, the amount of resolution has got to be reduced.
The slow motion is on 720p. I have not used it this year on the iPhone 6 but 5S had the 120fps at 720p.
 

bensweet108

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 10, 2014
15
0
Cheers everyone,

720 would be fine but I still can't seem to get it to my laptop. Only the original video, no the slow motion version…

I'll keep trying :)
 

Merkyworks

macrumors 6502
Oct 14, 2008
376
36
I thought unless you are running Mac OS the only way to export the video in slo-mo was to import into iMovie and slow down the speed then export it as a normal video.
 

Ruprict

macrumors newbie
Oct 13, 2014
17
0
You have to access the video via the lightning cable. Pull it from the folder on the iPhone-same way you would pull pictures off an SD card.

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The slow motion is on 720p. I have not used it this year on the iPhone 6 but 5S had the 120fps at 720p.
It maybe 720p but the quality is not good. Darker and more grainy than a good 720p video should be.
 

bensweet108

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 10, 2014
15
0
Yeah all the photos and videos show up when I plug it in but not the slow motion one, it's somehow embedded deeper into the system.

when I email it, it comes around 400 on the long side, not 720…

still working on this
 

localboy28

macrumors 6502a
Jul 27, 2010
791
11
You have to access the video via the lightning cable. Pull it from the folder on the iPhone-same way you would pull pictures off an SD card.

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It maybe 720p but the quality is not good. Darker and more grainy than a good 720p video should be.


Lighting has to be really good when shooting slo mo
When shooting anything @ that speed the film will come out grainy if lighting isn't perfect
 

Ruprict

macrumors newbie
Oct 13, 2014
17
0
1. Use Lots of Light
When you shoot slow mo, you are taking pictures quickly. And when you take pictures quickly, light has less time to create an image in your camera. Shoot in plenty of light, or you will get dark and gloomy slow-mo.
 

oneofthenine

macrumors regular
Sep 27, 2014
165
0
1. Use Lots of Light
When you shoot slow mo, you are taking pictures quickly. And when you take pictures quickly, light has less time to create an image in your camera. Shoot in plenty of light, or you will get dark and gloomy slow-mo.

Yep, if it is true 240fps then it is like a 1/240 shutter speed on a camera. Even a good DSLR with a quality lens is going to struggle to capture low light images at that shutter speed.
 

TruckdriverSean

macrumors 6502a
Feb 28, 2009
662
4
Texas, US
Yep. Light was near top of all the lists I found. Shutter speed is very quick at that point, giving half the time per exposure that you would get with 120fps if I'm understanding things.

In the context of a very auto-centric camera like the iPhone, that also means that the phone will bump up ISO to bring your image out of the dark, imparting a heck of a lot of noise in the process.
 

oneofthenine

macrumors regular
Sep 27, 2014
165
0
Yep. Light was near top of all the lists I found. Shutter speed is very quick at that point, giving half the time per exposure that you would get with 120fps if I'm understanding things.

In the context of a very auto-centric camera like the iPhone, that also means that the phone will bump up ISO to bring your image out of the dark, imparting a heck of a lot of noise in the process.
Yes exactly true with the ISO and also the bitrate is lower which will cause some noise.

The jury seems to still be out on whether the camera is really recording 240fps or whether it uses a twixtor style interpolation of a 120fps piece. I guess the way to tell would be to shoot a 5s 120fps video in the same lighting as a 6 240fps one and see if there is any fall off in lighting on the iPhone 6 as there should be exactly half the shutter speed.
 

Ruprict

macrumors newbie
Oct 13, 2014
17
0
Yes exactly true with the ISO and also the bitrate is lower which will cause some noise.

The jury seems to still be out on whether the camera is really recording 240fps or whether it uses a twixtor style interpolation of a 120fps piece. I guess the way to tell would be to shoot a 5s 120fps video in the same lighting as a 6 240fps one and see if there is any fall off in lighting on the iPhone 6 as there should be exactly half the shutter speed.
It is truly shooting 240. Actually, 239.4. The bitrate of 240fps and 30fps(1080p) was nearly identical.
 

weaverra

macrumors 6502
Sep 27, 2006
250
2
Yep, if it is true 240fps then it is like a 1/240 shutter speed on a camera. Even a good DSLR with a quality lens is going to struggle to capture low light images at that shutter speed.
Nope, it not like shutter speed. FPS and shutter speed are two different things. At 240fps you would need a shutter speed of 1/480 of a second. That means 240 frames of video are captured at 1/480 shutter speed per frame. Each of those 240 frames are exposed for 1/480th of a second. Basically it's 240 images per second. Shutter speed is only referring to how long the frame is exposed to light. You need two things either more light or higher ISO to compensate. The higher the ISO the more grain you will get.
 

oneofthenine

macrumors regular
Sep 27, 2014
165
0
It is truly shooting 240. Actually, 239.4. The bitrate of 240fps and 30fps(1080p) was nearly identical.
How did you test the in-camera fps before processing? Quite a few video sites are still looking through videos to work it out.

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Nope, it not like shutter speed. FPS and shutter speed are two different things. At 240fps you would need a shutter speed of 1/480 of a second. That means 240 frames of video are captured at 1/480 shutter speed per frame. Each of those 240 frames are exposed for 1/480th of a second. Basically it's 240 images per second. Shutter speed is only referring to how long the frame is exposed to light. You need two things either more light or higher ISO to compensate. The higher the ISO the more grain you will get.

wow, thanks and stand corrected. So that's a considerably larger amount of light needed.
 

weaverra

macrumors 6502
Sep 27, 2006
250
2
It is truly shooting 240. Actually, 239.4. The bitrate of 240fps and 30fps(1080p) was nearly identical.
You can tell because certain lights that use ballast will flicker when played back. The video size is nearly twice the size for the slow motion due to the extra frames even at the same bit rate.

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How did you test the in-camera fps before processing? Quite a few video sites are still looking through videos to work it out.

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wow, thanks and stand corrected. So that's a considerably larger amount of light needed.
Yes, in video you always want to set your shutter speed double your fps.