iPhone 7 more waterproof than S7?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Abazigal, Sep 17, 2016.

  1. Abazigal macrumors 604

    Abazigal

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Singapore
    #1


    The iPhone 7 is rated IP67. The S7 is rated IP68. On paper, the S7 should fare better at being dunked under water than the iPhone 7.

    Yet if you watch the video linked above, the end result is that the iPhone 7 can actually survive up to 35ft immersion in water (albeit without a little damage), while the S7 craps out completely.

    I guess specs really aren't everything. Interesting that Apple is actually being very conservative about a key selling point of their flagship product here. Guess they don't want another "-gate" incident on their hands.

    If you are still hurting over the loss of the headphone jack, know that it died for a very noble cause.
     
  2. Aditya_S macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2016
    #2
    Here's what I think probably happened that caused the S7 to die but not the iPhone 7. Water obviously went into both phone. Either water just got to the wrong places in the S7, or the iPhone 7 has things inside to further protect the components. IP ratings just tell you how deep the device can go before water gets inside, but it doesn't tell you what other things inside it could prevent damage to the components.
     
  3. Steve686 macrumors 68030

    Steve686

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    #3
    Gotta be the headphone jack making the difference.
     
  4. caelius macrumors regular

    caelius

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    Dec 31, 2015
    Location:
    Innsbruck, Austria
    #4
    Apple likes understatement. Best examples are the 6S de facto being quite a bit water resistant and the original Apple Watch easily surviving me swimming with it for about a year now...
     
  5. br0adband macrumors 6502a

    br0adband

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    #5
    It's not waterproof, it's water-resistant, they are NOT the same things, not even close.

    Sure would be nice if people would learn the difference at some point.

    (and to those that will say "you know what i mean..." I'd respond no, I don't because I don't typically make assumptions about what other people are saying - if they can't say things with some level of comprehension based on what they're talking about I just dismiss it more often than not)
     
  6. Steve686 macrumors 68030

    Steve686

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    #6
    This isn't even close to the 'clip' versus 'magazine' argument that I get to deal with all the time.
     
  7. MrInquestador macrumors member

    MrInquestador

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    Nov 14, 2015
    #7
    This!
     
  8. LewisChapman macrumors 6502a

    LewisChapman

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    #9
    Out of curiosity/clarity, what is the difference?
     
  9. jr866gooner macrumors 65816

    jr866gooner

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    Aug 24, 2013
    #10
    So can the ip7 survive a bath drop even though it's water resistant?
     
  10. The Game 161 macrumors G5

    The Game 161

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    #11
    From EAP video you would think it's waterproof in that test. Won't be long till apple truely make the iphone waterproof. It seems that the route they will take. Same with the apple watch
     
  11. br0adband macrumors 6502a

    br0adband

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    #12
    Waterproof means just that: water has zero effect on it, ever. You could toss it in a tub of water and come back years later and it still wouldn't have any issues from being submerged.

    Water-resistant means it's resistant to water in certain degrees. When you look at the IP ratings (the ones that matter for smartphones and other electronic devices are IP67 and IP68) it basically states that the device being rated can withstand submersion in water up to a limited depth (because more depth increases pressure which can force water into the device) and limited periods of time (because longer periods of submersion give water time to penetrate into those incredibly small gaps that all devices tend to have).

    The iPhone 7/7 Plus have ratings of IP67 so based on the ratings that 7 (in 67) means it can withstand water for a limited period of time - if it was IP68 it would be considered resistant for a continuous long term period of time but even that ends up having issues sooner or later too in most cases.

    Water being that two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom means it can work itself into most any space at all no matter how small that space happens to be - it's considered to be a "universal solvent" because given enough time water can literally work itself into anything.

    So, waterproof means impervious to the effects of water while water-resistant means resistant to the effects of water but not unlimited resistance, resistant to various degrees but not 100% resistant.

    What kills me about the IP67/IP68 usage with smartphones is that no manufacturer covers such potential damage with the warranty but they love using it in the marketing. ;)
     
  12. BorderingOn macrumors 6502

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    Jun 12, 2016
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    BaseCamp Pro
    #13
    How could they guarantee waterproofing if they don't individually test and certify them?

    And, no, the headphone jack makes not a bit of difference. The phone still has speakers, lightning jack. Headphone jacks need not be open internally so just need to seal with the case like all other openings.
     
  13. iTom17 macrumors 6502a

    iTom17

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2013
    Location:
    Eindhoven, the Netherlands
    #14
    Exactly what I thought when I saw the video. And just like EAP said himself: Apple has been very conservative with stating what their devices can actually handle. Anyway, good to see that the iPhone 7 does handle more pressure much better. Not that I will be throwing my one (as soon as I receive it of course) in the water, but at least I don't have to be afraid anymore for getting it wet.
     

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