iPhone and Ethernet (WiFi??)

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Michael.Dribins, Apr 22, 2009.

  1. Michael.Dribins macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2008
    #1
    Hey Guys,

    I was just wondering:

    In my university halls i've got an internet connection via Ethernet cable, is there any way that i can send that internet connection via WiFi from my macbook pro to my iphone 3g???

    Cheers.
     
  2. walldawg84 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2008
    #2
    I've never done it that way before but the way that I would think to do it would be to share your internet connection through System Preferences --> Network (i think that's the right part, i'm in work right now so nowhere near my laptop) and there should be a setting in there to activate it. If not then you're in the right area.

    Like I said I've not done it that way before, but i've used my blackbook's wireless and internet sharing to plug an ethernet from the blackbook to my xbox so that I can get on Live. I don't see any reason why it can't be done the other way.

    One thing that did just pop into my head though, is the hardware different for transmitting a wireless signal than just recieving it, or is that inconsequential? Anybody know?
     
  3. vandozza macrumors 6502a

    vandozza

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Location:
    Australia
    #3
    sharing the ethernet connection via wi-fi in system preferences / sharing / internet will work.

    if you can't be bothered having to have your laptop open to use wi-fi on the phone, buy an airport express.
     
  4. the-sandman macrumors regular

    the-sandman

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Location:
    Leicester, UK
    #4
    You need to be careful with doing that in university halls. In mine, They record the MAC address of the equipment connected and when i shared my connection to my iphone through my mac like that, it resulted in the i.p address changing constantly (or something like that), and as a result, they disconnected me from the internet, as it looks to them you're trying to share your connection with someone else, and i had to pay a £30 reconnection fee.

    Just thought i'd give you the heads up, just in case :)
     
  5. kzoojason76 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    #5
    Why not just get a router with WiFi. The router can clone the MAC address of your macbook pro, so that shouldn't be a problem.
     
  6. koobcamuk macrumors 68040

    koobcamuk

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2006
    #6
    This.

    It'll illegal in UK universities to share your connection. It can be done though. I am doing it in this hotel right now.

    Read your terms of use. Ignorance is not an excuse.
     
  7. the-sandman macrumors regular

    the-sandman

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Location:
    Leicester, UK
    #7
    Annoyingly i wasn't sharing the connection, but it's my word against theirs, and i got away with using a router for a few months, then they came across it and they said no to any use of wi-fi, so i just got an ethernet switch and its all fine.
     
  8. walldawg84 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2008
    #8
    OP,

    did you try it out?? Any thoughts or results??
     
  9. marvinGS macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2008
    #9
    I think you should use a network bridge. A rooter might mess the entire network so your network admin wouldnt be very happy. With a bridge on the other hand any connected device will act like they are directly connected with a cable. Dont forget to encrypt your connection and preferably hide your ssid.
     
  10. PoitNarf macrumors 65816

    PoitNarf

    Joined:
    May 28, 2007
    Location:
    Northern NJ
    #10
    Most medium to large institutions will have some sort of NAC (Network Access Control) system in place to monitor and prevent unauthorized devices from connecting to their networks, both wired and wireless. Sometimes you can get around this by doing what this poster said:

    Cloning a MAC address may work, but many institutions will also actively monitor their wireless space for rogue access points and shut them down. We do this at the college I work at to prevent unauthorized access to our network.
     

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