Iphone > Coding > etc.

Discussion in 'iOS Programming' started by nelsencaleb, Jan 20, 2010.

  1. nelsencaleb macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    Location:
    Iowa
    #1
    Hello.

    To clear the air:
    I would like to give coding a wak. I do not own an iPhone.

    Questions:
    1. Can I test iPhone apps on my Mac?
    2. What language should I use?
    3. What programs should I use to code in?

    Thank in advance.
     
  2. TEG macrumors 604

    TEG

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2002
    Location:
    Langley, Washington
    #2
    The iPhone SDK includes a simulator.
    You can only program in Cocoa (a version of Objective-C).
    X-Code is used in conjunction with the SDK to program.

    TEG
     
  3. dejo Moderator

    dejo

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Location:
    The Centennial State
    #3
    Cocoa is not a version of Objective-C. Objective-C is the programming language. Cocoa and Cocoa Touch (which is what's used with the iPhone OS) are frameworks. Plus, you can program in C mostly, if you wanted, and just use Objective-C for a few pieces (although I don't think it makes much sense).

    Anyways, nelsencaleb , make sure you visit the Stickies and Guides at the top of this very forum.
     
  4. firewood macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    #4
    You can't run App store apps on your Mac. You can recompile the source code of iPhone apps to run on a Simulator that runs on your Mac.

    Objective C and Javascript. You need to know both C and object oriented programming.

    The iPhone SDK XCode and Safari are the supported development environments.
     
  5. nelsencaleb thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    Location:
    Iowa
    #5
    Reply

    Lots of feed back ehh?

    This sounds pretty confusing.

    1. So, if I get that simulator, I can just drag and drop the code from an app into there and test it with that?

    2. Is there a name for the simulator? Link?

    3. I need to learn C and Object oriented programming.

    4. What is Object oriented programming? Link? I'll try google.

    Thanks,
    Caleb:D
     
  6. dejo Moderator

    dejo

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Location:
    The Centennial State
    #6
    Just to be clear:

    Native apps: Objective-C and Xcode.

    Local web apps: Javascript and Mobile Safari (although you can wrap your web app in a native shell, if you want).

    Remote web apps: whatever languages and dev tools you would use for a web app, assuming what they produced is supported in iPhone OS's UIWebView (i.e. no Flash or Java applets).

    You don't drag and drop. You develop the app in Xcode and then, when ready to test, you build your app and, based on your settings, it will be deployed to the simulator and start up for you.

    Name: iPhone Simulator.
    Link: What are you hoping the link will provide you with?

    Also, realize that the simulator has some limits (no accelerometer, etc.) so it's normally recommended to test your apps on actual devices as well.
     
  7. KoolStar macrumors demi-god

    KoolStar

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #7
    If you refuse to use objective-c you could look at MonoTouch.
     
  8. icewing macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Location:
    St Louis
    #8
    Quick start

    Like someone said before, first read the stickies at the top of this forum.

    Next, create a free Apple account and download and install the SDK on your Mac (not available for the PC).

    Fire it up, download some of Apple's examples, and look around.

    Buy some books and go through the tutorials (recommendations in the stickies).

    Finally, after you learn how to write programs, and have something working that you think people would want,

    then and only then give Apple your $99 for a paid Developer account (which lets you submit apps to the App store.
     

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