iPhone / iPod Touch "Locked" into testing mode?

Discussion in 'iOS Programming' started by Darkroom, Sep 13, 2008.

  1. Darkroom Guest

    Darkroom

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2006
    Location:
    Montréal, Canada
    #1
    from the iPhone Developer Licensing Agreement:

    You acknowledge that by installing the Apple Software on Your Authorized Test Devices, these Devices may be “locked” into testing mode and may not be capable of being restored to their original condition. Apple shall not be responsible for any costs, expenses or other liabilities You may incur as a result of provisioning Your Authorized Test Devices and Registered Devices, Your Application development or the installation or use of this Apple Software, including but not limited to any damage to any equipment, software or data.

    humm... so what exactly is that suppose to mean? people who use their iPhones or iPod Touch for testing their app can never restore their device?

    thoughts?
     
  2. italiano40 macrumors 65816

    italiano40

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Location:
    NY
    #2
    it is so that you can't complaint about battery life and other things when you are testing your apps
     
  3. Darkroom thread starter Guest

    Darkroom

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2006
    Location:
    Montréal, Canada
    #3
    but what about after testing? is the battery life still gonna suck?
     
  4. italiano40 macrumors 65816

    italiano40

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Location:
    NY
    #4
    this is what i am thinking that testing mode can't be turned off and it probably logs everything from FPS to commands called to errors, etc... and that takes alot of battery power and they are trying to cover themselfs
     
  5. Darkroom thread starter Guest

    Darkroom

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2006
    Location:
    Montréal, Canada
    #5
    wow... if that's the case that would be something to talk about... you buy an iPhone, you buy into the developer program, apple takes a 30% cut WHILE their software could kill your device?

    though it does seem to read as a worst case scenario, and hopefully if their app did kill the device they would fix it.

    i'd be interested to hear experiences from real testers in the program. if they were able to remove the software after launching their app, or if it has permanently slowed down their device.
     
  6. kalimba macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2008
    #6
    Why do you think this issue is "something to talk about"? You must not have any experience developing for other closed platform systems, such as gaming consoles (Xbox 360, PS3, Wii, etc.). Most of the development programs for those types of platforms require you to purchase a special piece of development hardware, often in the price range of tens of thousands or dollars (US), and the hardware is only good for product development (i.e. you can not use the development hardware to play regular retail games).

    Apple has made it extraordinarily easy for any layperson to use their own personal iPhone for product development. Now that's something to talk about.
     
  7. Darkroom thread starter Guest

    Darkroom

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2006
    Location:
    Montréal, Canada
    #7
    ... in which case perhaps apple should only release device testing software that certainly doesn't kill the device, otherwise it's not so extraordinary after all...

    layperson? really?
     
  8. kalimba macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2008
    #8
    I guess you're missing the point that Apple has done you and other "developers" a HUGE favor by allowing development on the actual device, rather than making developers purchase an expensive piece of development hardware.

    Read this forum much? How many newbie posts are there every day saying "I want to write a so-and-so application for the iPhone, but I don't have any idea where to start"? Yes, because anyone with an iPhone and the free SDK can actually develop an iPhone app, I'd say that there are quite a few "laypersons" trying to write iPhone software.

    As a professional game developer who has written code for Xbox, PS2, Xbox360 and PS3 platforms, I find it a blessing that Apple designed their dev program such that I can write iPhone code without shelling out $20,000 for a development kit. Trust me, you're looking a gift horse in the mouth. If you're so concerned about ruining you iPhone, perhaps you should invest in another device specifically for "development only".
     
  9. Sbrocket macrumors 65816

    Sbrocket

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    Location:
    /dev/null
    #9
    I'm fairly certain you have no idea what you're talking about, or at least not evidence for your claims. The "use the device for testing only" is a provision to cover Apple's ass in case a bug made it into a development version of the software that, for example, disabled phone access. The provision of the agreement would mean that they'd have no liability in that case, as you were using a testing device as you weren't supposed to. Its to cover their ass, not so they can damage your hardware without any liability.

    The iPhone developer program, compared to developing for other closed platforms, is awesome. Anyone with an iPhone or iPod Touch can develop right on their device and upload to the AppStore at will for $100, and you can even develop for free with the SDK and the Simulator. Sure, the setup has its disadvantages - Apple can deny what they want, and Apple is the sole source and solution for iPhone development. Its not a terrible program, though, and right now the AppStore represents a wealth (literally) of untapped potential for individual developers and development teams alike.
     

Share This Page