iPhone Photos Compression - Better App?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by LERsince1991, Nov 12, 2014.

  1. LERsince1991 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Location:
    UK
    #1
    I noticed some compression on photos I was editing from my iPhone.

    Now that the cameras are getting decent and the fact they are so useful since we always have them, I was thinking - what is the best way to get a highest quality photograph from the iPhone?

    It seems the stock camera app is compressing.
    I came across this article for an app (however rubbish it looks) which saves them as uncompressed tiffs or 100% quality jpegs when using it as a camera app.

    I also wondered how much compression quality apps such as VSCO Cam would compress the images

    I then thought, why shouldn't the iPhone be able to take RAW photos allowing us to pull back an overexposed sky or face for example. This app claimed to do this in march 2013, however it was proved false by CNET.


    So in summary, how can we get the best out of our iPhone cameras?

    Isn't it about time apple starting striving for digital quality as well rather than decent hardware! I'm talking lossless iTunes Match, uncompressed iCloud Photo Library, Photo Streams, un-limited Photos app editing extensions, etc...
     
  2. Miltz macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2013
    Location:
    New York
    #2
    There is so such thing as RAW on the iphone, just marketing. There is a .TIFF file output, on camera + but the difference is so small it's not worth it. If you are looking for better "technical" quality on the files then use a DSLR or camera with a larger sensor that supports RAW.
     
  3. JDDavis macrumors 65816

    JDDavis

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2009
    #3
    If someone is interested in producing the best possible image they can from thier iphone and they enjoy it then what's the harm? The "buy a DSLR" answer only derails the conversation. I'd rather be told to take a class, practice more, study the greats, find a mentor, etc... then simply buy better equipment. That being said...

    I couldn't find on the interwebs how the iphone actually processes the image the lens and sensor capture. There's probably folks on this forum that know. It's a jpg when you see it and save it in the native app so obviously there is compression but what does the data start out as (well data of course). Is there a way to utilize the data before it's rendered into what we see in the camera app and the photo roll? Maybe...I don't think it's truly a RAW file like we know of with a DSLR though.

    Here are two links I found to read for more info on getting a better quality image from the iphone. Maybe they are just app advertising, maybe there's something to it. I might investigate a few of these myself. I like pursuing photography with both my iphone and my DSLR. I think one of the more important aspects is what the author of the first link started with and that is you have to start with an interesting image to begin with (and the device has little to do with that). I'd add specifically for the iphone, that you have to know and accept it's limitations. It's not going to produce good quality images in bad light conditions no matter what you do. (I didn't say it can't produce interesting images in those conditions...that's up to you).

    http://lifeinlofi.com/2013/03/28/creating-high-resolution-images-on-iphone-5-by-sid-pena/

    http://www.photigy.com/getting-maximum-from-your-iphone-camera-raw-tiff-vs-jpeg/
     
  4. LERsince1991 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Location:
    UK
    #4
    I have a DSLR but only use it for proper shoots (my signature says Canon 60D...)
    I have a decent point and shoot, but I still don't take it everywhere.

    As I said in summary in the OP
    JDDavis - that last link is interesting, bummer I can't actually access the "ClearCam" app - its US store only though (I'm in UK) and even if I changed stores I found this post implying its now been deleted from the store? Anyone in the US check for me? Also if I change store to US, download it to iTunes and change back to UK can I use the app?

    I also have a possible issue with that guys workflow as he uses 2 or 3 different apps to apply edits to his photo, each time they are saved back to the camera roll the compression stacks up (unless they are still tiffs maybe)

    ClearCam is the sort of thing I'm looking for, a decent photo app which can grab top quality photos without compression.
     
  5. sarge macrumors 6502a

    sarge

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2003
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    #5
    All proprietary RAW formats are based on the .TIFF Standard. There is a big mathematical gap between JPEG and .TIFF as .TIFF files are in fact uncompressed. Even JPEG2000 compression is 'lossy and irreversible'.

    ----------

    I'm shooting with the ProCamera App and it can store uncompressed .TIFF files. It can store LZW files too but the processing to .LZW takes longer and so slows the burst rate
     
  6. mofunk macrumors 68000

    mofunk

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2009
    Location:
    Americas
    #6
    I always think when the image is crappy, you haven't planned you way of capturing it. It doesn't matter what type of camera you are using, you should always plan. On the iPhone you can lock in your focus so that you get a clear and steady shot. Outside shooting, don't be afraid to use the flash.


    This month, you can get Camera+ for free. I think you can go directly to Apps store. If it doesn't show as a free app, open the Apple Store App - click on Store - Scroll down until you see the icon app for Camera+

    Its a great app.
     
  7. Miltz macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2013
    Location:
    New York
    #7
    Well download the camera+ app and see for yourself. The difference is so small you have to pixel peep to see it. Perhaps the iphone jpeg engine is excellent.
     
  8. sarge macrumors 6502a

    sarge

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2003
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    #8
    I would only argue that maybe if you wanted to perform some post production tweaking a TIFF file allows for a bit more latitude in manipulating the final image. Personally I plan on outputting my images as physical prints so every little bit counts.
     
  9. Ray2 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2014
    #9
    Photogene offer choices in compression. It provides the least compressed image files I've seen with any if the more popular editors. A lovely traditional editing package as well. Nit sure I'd want to use it on a phone though.

    Realistically speaking, I doubt you will see any difference with an iPhone jpeg no matter how much pixel peeping you perform. There's a trade-off between convenience and IQ.
     

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