iPhone replacement - refurbished?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by marty1990, Jan 24, 2016.

  1. marty1990 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2011
    Location:
    England
    #1
    My warranty is due to end in a couple of weeks, and since owning my iPhone (6 Plus), I've had an issue with the home button. After owning it a couple of weeks the button became loose and occasionally unresponsive, so I took it to Apple who replaced the screen, as the home button is attached.

    Few months later the same thing happened again, and they offered to replace my phone. I declined as I realise that the replacements are refurbished, and preferred to keep mine as it was still pretty new. They tested it and then replaced the screen again.

    Now the issue has started again, so I've booked in to the Genius Bar for next week, and, assuming they have my previous visits on record, I'm going to wipe my phone, tell them the problem, and then they'll hopefully replace it.

    Now I know the replacement phones aren't new. I've had my phone for 11 months so I wouldn't expect to be given a new one, but what exactly is Apple's definition of refurbished?

    Are they just returned phones, or do they have a mix of returned parts and new parts - like a new case, screen etc? That's what I've read online, but not sure how true this is.
     
  2. Shadowbech macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2011
    #2
    It's more of a replacement unit. Outside casing is brand new, new screen, battery is new (you can tell if it has 0 or 1 cycle on it). Essentially it is a returned phone that has been taken apart and only re-use the working parts. The Aluminum casing gets recycled and reused.
     
  3. eyoungren macrumors P6

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    Phoenix • 85037
    #3
    Apple refers to them as reconditioned. They are a mix of reconditioned phones and new phones.

    Refurbs, as mentioned, have all new casings, battery, screen, etc. Apple tests all parts and replaces with new OEM parts as needed. The phone then goes through a new series of tests that are more stringent than the ones they send new phones through. Because of the entire process it's impossible to distinguish reconditioned from new except if you were to check serials numbers and Apple has in recent years moved away from serial numbers that are easily identifiable as refurb.

    Essentially, you are getting a new phone - period. And the replacements come with 30 day warranty so if it does fail in those 30 days you'll get another replacement.
     
  4. MephistoZap macrumors newbie

    MephistoZap

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2016
    #4
    Apple sure got stingy, I remember it used to be a 90 day warranty.
     
  5. eyoungren macrumors P6

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    Phoenix • 85037
    #5
    It may still be that. I probably have my numbers wrong.
     
  6. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    At the iPhone hacks section.
    #6
    If it looks, feels and works like brand new then what does it matter?
    You want one that works without having to repair it 3 times right?
    I don't get that I turn in my 11 month old used device but I want a brand new and refurb units are no good logic.
     
  7. T5BRICK macrumors 604

    T5BRICK

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Location:
    Oregon
    #7
    It's still 90 days.

    http://www.apple.com/legal/sales-support/terms/repair/Retail_Repair_US_Terms_Conditions.html

    I'm going to go and blame Packard Bell, eMachines and HP. Other PC manufacturers really burned the customers selling refurbished products. Apple refurbs are basically new, so there really shouldn't be any issue with them.
     
  8. Retired Cat macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2013
    #8
    Agreed.

    My iPhone 5 had to get replaced last week :-(. The battery swelled up and the screen started bowing up badly, so a genius at the Apple Store said I could get an out-of-warranty replacement for the $79 battery replacement cost.

    Replacement phone came in a refurb box (no accessories). It had protective plastic on front and back, and looks completely new. Back shell, display, and buttons showed no sign of previous use. Battery had 1 cycle and full charge capacity available. I would guess that the phone actually is mostly new. Maybe the system board, cameras, and vibrate motor are recycled, but I'm ok with that. No point in tossing out perfectly working components and generating more e-waste.
     
  9. marty1990 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2011
    Location:
    England
    #9
    Went tonight after work. Told them the issue, they pulled up my records and said that since I'd had two screen replacements, as the issue is intermittent, they offered me a DFU restore...?

    I mentioned how the last Genius I saw offered me a replacement but the one I saw today said his higher up advised a DFU restore, I said it seemed like a mechanical problem but he advised a restore may help (?) and that if it was to happen again then I'd be eligible for a replacement. The catch is I need to make an appt. when the issue is happening and not use my phone till the appt.

    Anyway, after the DFU restore my phone's doing funky things. Recorded it with my tablet. Screen keeps flickering, button not responding and only way I can fix it is to reset my phone.

    Will me showing a video help?

    I shouldn't have to justify this.
     
  10. Newtons Apple macrumors G5

    Newtons Apple

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #10
    Just take it back with some of you video and they should replace or repair it.
     
  11. Mlrollin91 macrumors G4

    Mlrollin91

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    Location:
    Ventura County
    #11
    Apple doesn't even classify them as refurbished, they call them 'remanufactured'. Remanufactured is what others have described, a new housing, new battery, and a new screen. Only the internals are refurbished/remanufactured. I have typically experienced better luck with replacements from the genius bar instead of buying new because of the thorough testing they go through on the assembly line.
     
  12. Appl3FTW macrumors 601

    Appl3FTW

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2012
    #12
    The refurb carries over the same warranty as your original. So let's say your original have 2 months left, your refurb replacement will have 2 months of warranty left.
     
  13. yaboyac29 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2014
    #13
    did you restore from backup?
     
  14. marty1990 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2011
    Location:
    England
    #14
    Not, setup as a new iPhone twice.

    Booked in again for Tuesday. Will take my tablet with the video on so hopefully that'll be enough.
     
  15. Max(IT) Suspended

    Max(IT)

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    Location:
    Italy
    #15
    the refurbished could be newer than you 11 months old phone anyway
     
  16. laudern macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2011
    #16
    Yep I'd take a new refurbished phone over a year old used phone any day!
     
  17. marty1990 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2011
    Location:
    England
    #17
    So, it was swapped. Very happy with the new one.

    Genius told me that my warranty is extended to 90 days - however, I checked on Apples warranty checker and used the new serial number from my new phone, and it came back as saying I only have 17 days - which is what I had on the old phone.

    Do I need to do anything to get the 90 days?
     
  18. RadioGaGa1984 Suspended

    RadioGaGa1984

    Joined:
    May 23, 2015
    #18

    I would give it a few days if it doesn't update then I would call Applecare
     
  19. Shadowbech macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2011
    #19
    As above, give a few days, it can take a while for the system to update.
     
  20. Retired Cat macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2013
    #20
    Some interesting observations on my iPhone 5 refurb (re-manufactured Dec 2015) vs. my original iPhone 5 (early 2013):

    Home Button click is very different. 2013 iPhone 5 had more resistance and louder "click". 2015 iPhone 5 is softer, and feels more like a 6/6s. Both work well and I have no preference either way.

    Vibrate motor not quite as smooth on the 2015 compared to 2013. Maybe it's not broken in yet, or perhaps it's due to tolerances being different.

    Lightning Port on the 2015 has better engagement than 2013. Port is less stiff, but still clicks nicely.

    Hopefully the screen on the 2015 will stay good. The 2013 screen developed a pink-ish hue after a year.
     

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