iPhone touch screen trumps Droid, Nexus One, Eris?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Cleverboy, Jan 9, 2010.

  1. Cleverboy macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #1
    http://labs.moto.com/diy-touchscreen-analysis/

    Just read this from Electronista:
    http://www.electronista.com/articles/10/01/09/iphone.more.accurate.than.droid.nexus.one/

    There are a number of painting programs on my iPhone, as well as any number of programs that rely on touch precision (Eliminator Pro for one). When the iPhone first came out in 2007, I'd picked up "Sketches" (I'd previously been a fan of the jailbroken version). Years later, I've happily purchased Brushes and Sketch Mobile and they've both been fantastic programs I look forward to using more.

    Looking at these simple examples of poor-precision from these Android programs is the nightmare scenario I'd always been concerned about with the iPhone... that when it was finally tested, the iPhone's touchscreen would show that its version of "touch" sensitivity wouldn't be useable for painting programs. Instead, it sounds like the rush to release advanced hardware has made iPhone's competitors release products with the deficiencies I thought iPhone would have had (but never did).

    ~ CB
     

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  2. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #2
    The biggest interference maker for a capacitive touchscreen is the LCD behind it.

    Size, resolution, materials, distance... all play a part.

    Having 800x480 active transistor pixels is not a big help for either the Droid or Nexus.

    They need to do some electronic/hardware tweaking and/or add software smoothing.
     
  3. ToroidalZeus macrumors 68020

    ToroidalZeus

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    #3
    Uhm NO

    Resolution is nothing if the screens ntsc accuracy is off or the size is thinner like the droids or the touchscreen technology is inferior like all those phones.
     
  4. OneWhoTweets macrumors newbie

    OneWhoTweets

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    #4
    Nope

    Although the screens on the Droid and Nexus One have greater resolutions, the iTouch and iPhone have the best response to touch. They also have a great feeling which none of the android phones to date can match (I have used all the U.S. versions).
     
  5. Cleverboy thread starter macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #5
    That's the interesting thing. These SIMPLE tests, really show that they could clearly work on their "smoothing" and not be exposed so embarassingly for poor quality results. I don't think smoothing however would address a lower sampling rate (which might be hardware dependent, accuracy perhaps lost in the attempt to lower component cost or lower battery consumption?)

    It would be encouraging to think they could update their drivers and resolve the problems.

    ~ CB
     
  6. iphones4evry1 macrumors 65816

    iphones4evry1

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    #6
    I have a draw app on my iPhone 3G and I can draw perfectly straight lines (near perfect, not absolute perfect, of course). The lines look perfectly straight to the eye. App is Sketchbook.

    In my opinion, it's dam good!
     
  7. ntrigue macrumors 68040

    ntrigue

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    #7
    Mind you, it's a slow drawing rate to ensure all data points are contacted.

    I can rapidly draw straight lines.
     
  8. gloss macrumors 601

    gloss

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  9. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #9
    That's the problem with press releases like this one... they're intended to garner publicity for that company or group, more than anything else.

    The testers themselves say they have more scientific methods they use, but those aren't what they released. They also said that most tests showed little problem, but the worst photos are what are posted.

    There are things to consider:

    1) The iPhone has the least PPI, and so cannot show as much stair stepping.

    2) We don't know the resolution of the touchscreens on the other devices. If they actually have 850x480 touchable points vs the iPhone's 480x320, that's a factor because the higher touch ppi means it's MORE sensitive to a stroke's wobbles.

    3) The silliness about this affecting the keyboard is beyond ridiculous, when you think about the different size of your finger pads, plus the Droid has a hardware keyboard anyway.

    4) Way too much brouhaha over this, since very, very few apps would be affected by such a little waviness. After all, the whole point of touch UIs is that they accept gross sized touches. If you want to worry about accuracy, get a stylus driven system.
     
  10. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 604

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    #10
    It's not that silly of a test when you think of all the nit picking that's done to the iPhone.
     
  11. Cleverboy thread starter macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #11
    Interesting. So you're dismissing the assertion that the iPhone has a higher sampling rate for touch input, and simple going with the fact that the screen resolution is higher on the other devices.
    You know... in the amount of times each pixel is polled is LOWER on the Android devices, because it has more pixels per area... it would make a lot of sense, and I'd truly expect the quality of the touchscreen accuracy to be degraded.

    I mean... I see what you're thinking, but considering the VISUAL DISPLAY and the CAPACITIVE TOUCH layer are two separate components (last I read anyway), I'd think one would not conflate the two things.

    ~ CB
     
  12. gloss macrumors 601

    gloss

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    #12
    A major issue here is that the quality of the software used to perform the test is not guaranteed to be identical on all platforms. More importantly, the finger gestures themselves, by nature, will differ between tests, as they are done 'live' by an individual.

    This test could only be done properly using identical programs which boast identically accurate results vis a vis the touch screen's input and a mechanism able to produce the exact same inputs on each of the four screens, both in terms of pressure and track.

    In other words, the whole thing is sort of bollocks.
     
  13. Cleverboy thread starter macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #13
    Well, not the "quality of the software". Let's assume that the "quality" is the same and that the software is custom on each device. I think its more of a concern that the finger-swipe is not mechanically driven using Pogo styluses as necessary. Disclosing the methodology of the software routines would help, but assuming them standard, wouldn't be too hard given the basic nature of the function.
    Maybe you're thinking of "benchmarks" where the software could run by itself. Unfortunately, touchscreens are real-world mechanisms that need to be interacted with. I think they main shortfall is in not drafting a mechanical test. I can't see how it would have been hard either.
    I think its useful and even relevant, just not strictly scientific OR transparent. I'd be willing to bet however, that the results are indicative of real disparities across the displays however.

    ~ CB
     

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