iPhone viruses? anti-virus?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by NovemberWhiskey, Aug 14, 2009.

  1. NovemberWhiskey macrumors 68030

    NovemberWhiskey

    Joined:
    May 18, 2009
    #1
    Are there viruses out there for the iphone? I keep hearing macs are safer than PCs, but how vulnerable are iphones?

    I received an email about a week ago from my aunt, and opened it up on my iphone. Apparently some photos were attached, and the phone froze while the email was being opened.

    I have settings set to load remote images.

    I had to do a hard reset to re-start the phone. Did I pick up some malware? Would there be any way to check?

    Are there anti-viruses out there for the iphone?
     
  2. ziggyonice macrumors 68020

    ziggyonice

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Rural America
    #2
    Macs don't get viruses. And iPhones don't either. Which is why anti-virus programs aren't needed on Macs or iPhones.

    But if you're having problems with your iPhone, you may want to try restoring it, which will clear up any issues. :)
     
  3. NovemberWhiskey thread starter macrumors 68030

    NovemberWhiskey

    Joined:
    May 18, 2009
    #3
    Are you sure there are no viruses out there? This is something I've heard, but I can't imagine why there wouldn't be any out there. I mean, it did freeze up my phone forcing me to do a hard restart. So something must have been going on.
     
  4. Harman M macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    #4
    You'd have to install the malware first. Don't worry though, Cydia is good about warning you before putting in danger repo's. There was talk about the pirate applications out there being bugged, but I think somebody did something about that, no idea.
     
  5. blancoBronco macrumors 6502a

    blancoBronco

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Location:
    South Tampa
    #5
    there is a 99.99% chance you will not get a virus on the iPhone. safari is the safest Internet browser. and don't be like 'but what about that .01%?' it's not happening. you will never have to worry about a virus. calm down
     
  6. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

    Tallest Skil

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2006
    Location:
    1 Geostationary Tower Plaza
    #6
    Yes.

    That's the iPhone operating normally.
     
  7. scaredpoet macrumors 604

    scaredpoet

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    #7
    Trust me, if there had been a virus out in the wild for the iPhone, you'd hear about it ALL over the news. Plenty of news sources and tech sites out there would have a blast skewering Apple and the iPhone if there was a virus out there.

    To be sure, there have been occasional security holes found where someone could have written a virus. But those get patched by Apple through firmware updates. In effect, that is your "antivirus" right there. Just keep updating firmware when Apple comes out with a new version and you'll be fine.

    I can think of a couple of reasons. There's the security thing: the constant argument has been that it's just plain easier to write viruses for Windows computers than it is for Macs and cell phones. The security model of OS X is different, and the iPhone's OS is even more restrictive (if not jailbroken).

    But there are people who, despite there never really being a significant or lasting virus outbreak for the iPhone or for Macs, will reject the security argument.

    Fine. It's still unlikely you're going to see viruses for the iPhone.

    For starters, Viruses and malware these days are driven by economic motives, and no longer for notoriety or just for the sake of being a jerk. Viruses put computers to work spamming, targeting sites for Denial of service attacks from people who have hired hackers to take those sites down, and scamming people out of their passwords, bank account info and identities.

    Desktop computers and hacked servers are great for this. There are many more desktops and servers out there (especially ones running Windows) than there are Macs or iPhones. Desktops and servers sit on desks (or in datacenters), fed a constant source of power, and many are left on, unattended, overnight or for days on end, connected to a broadband connection at all times. So, they make very reliable points to do a hacker's bidding.

    An iPhone? Not so much. Granted, the current specs of an iPhone 3G actually compare pretty well to some basic-level hosted servers for simple websites. But, iPhones are constantly moving, constantly switching between the cell network and WiFi hotspots for data connectivity, and that reduces their reliability and makes their connection speeds erratic. They also run on batteries which can run down, and are subject to be shut off or rebooted at any point by their owners. iPhones also heat up and their batteries are subject to running down much faster if made to do a lot of data intensive work. These are both behaviors that an iPhone owner will notice right away, and either restore their phone's software or take in it in for an exchange, at which point the iPhone ceases to be useful to the hacker who infected it.

    So, while writing a successful iPhone virus might make a hacker a very notable individual and gain a lot of press, those phones won't do a very good job of making that hacker any money, which is the prime motivation these days for malware. And once the notoriety is out there, Apple will likely issue a software patch and that'll be the end of that.


    That "something" was probably just a software bug. A phone freezing up once doesn't mean you have a virus.
     
  8. jmann macrumors 604

    jmann

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2007
    Location:
    bump on a log in a hole in the bottom of the sea
    #8
    The only dangerous thing that could happen to your phone would be if it was accessed by SSH by someone else (only can work if your phone is jailbroken), or by that stupid "SMS threat" (fixed by 3.0.1). Other than that, don't worry about it, you phone is secure.
     
  9. fenderbass146 macrumors 65816

    fenderbass146

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Northwest Indiana
  10. jmann macrumors 604

    jmann

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2007
    Location:
    bump on a log in a hole in the bottom of the sea
    #10
    Yeah, if you're foolish and download shady things, and then enter your password you can get "trojans, or malware" but actual "viruses" don't exist on a Mac. It is very unlikely that you download a malicious app if you are smart about it.
     
  11. fenderbass146 macrumors 65816

    fenderbass146

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Northwest Indiana
    #11
    regardless, they can get virus. I have a mac and have never had one, but i know people who have gotten viruses on a mac
     
  12. OneMike macrumors 601

    OneMike

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    #12
    I've never heard of a person getting a virus on a mac.

    I've heard of people downloading pirated mac apps and getting trojans but never heard of a virus.
     
  13. jmann macrumors 604

    jmann

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2007
    Location:
    bump on a log in a hole in the bottom of the sea
    #13
    That's because there are only Trojans and Malware on Macs no viruses. In order for an app to do damage to your computer, you have to authenticate it by entering in your password.
     
  14. labman macrumors 604

    labman

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    Location:
    Mich near Detroit
    #14
    most people are confused

    about Viruses & Trojan's

    Real simple a trojan effect's the computer it's downloaded too a virus goal is effect other computers in it's network some virus don't even show on the 1st computer at 1st so it can spread easier. BTW the info below is copied from Microsoft we know all about Trojan's, Virus and worms. ;)

    What is a computer virus?
    A computer virus is a small software program that spreads from one computer to another computer and that interferes with computer operation. A computer virus may corrupt or delete data on a computer, use an e-mail program to spread the virus to other computers, or even delete everything on the hard disk.

    Computer viruses are most easily spread by attachments in e-mail messages or by instant messaging messages. Therefore, you must never open an e-mail attachment unless you know who sent the message or unless you are expecting the e-mail attachment. Computer viruses can be disguised as attachments of funny images, greeting cards, or audio and video files. Computer viruses also spread by using downloads on the Internet. Computer viruses can be hidden in pirated software or in other files or programs that you may download.

    Wikipedia here

    A Trojan horse, or trojan for short, is a term used to describe malware that appears, to the user, to perform a desirable function but, in fact, facilitates unauthorized access to the user's computer system. The term comes from the Trojan Horse story in Greek mythology. Trojan horses are not self-replicating which distinguishes them from viruses and worms. Additionally, they require interaction with a hacker to fulfil their purpose. The hacker need not be the individual responsible for distributing the Trojan horse. It is possible for hackers to scan computers on a network using a port scanner in the hope of finding one with a Trojan horse installed
     
  15. Small White Car macrumors G4

    Small White Car

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Location:
    Washington DC
    #15
    He didn't say there are Mac viruses. He said they can get viruses.

    And that's true, Macs have good security but they're not magical. It is possible, it just hasn't happened.

    The iPhone is a bit more secure given that apps are locked into their own sandbox and can't run in the background.
     
  16. mgamber macrumors 6502a

    mgamber

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2008
    Location:
    1966
    #16
    No, not regardless. Macs don't get viruses. You can give it one, you might know people who disregarded warnings and let one loose on their Mac but it didn't just happen.
     
  17. Looon macrumors 6502a

    Looon

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    #17
    Same thing as on a PC. Basically don't be an idiot and you'll be fine.
     

Share This Page