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Apr 12, 2001
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One of the new features included in Apple's high-end OLED iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max is improved water and dust resistance, with the two devices now offering an IP68 rating, equivalent to Samsung's Galaxy S9 smartphones.

The IP68 rating means the iPhone XS and XS Max can withstand water up to two meters (6.6 feet) deep for approximately 30 minutes. In this number, the IP6x rating refers to dust resistance while the 8 represents water resistance.

iphonexsxsmax-800x663.jpg

IP6x is the highest dust resistance rating, so the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max are fully protected from dust and dirt. The new IP68 rating is up from the IP67 rating of previous iPhones.

Apple's iPhone XR is also water and dust resistant, but it is IP67 rated rather than IP68 rated, like the iPhone X. IP67 means that the iPhone XR can withstand immersion in water up to one meter (3.3 feet) for 30 minutes.

Apple does not cover any kind of water damage to its iOS devices, so it's always best to use caution when exposing a water resistant iPhone to liquids.

Apple also warns that seals against water resistance can weaken over time, which is another reason why it's best not to deliberately expose iPhones to moisture. In general, though, the iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max, and iPhone XR will hold up to accidental splashes of water and rain.

The Apple Watch Series 4, also newly announced, continues to feature the same water resistance rating as the Apple Watch Series 3. It has a water resistance of rating of 50 meters under ISO standard 22810:2010.

That means the Apple Watch Series 4 is suitable for shallow-water activities like swimming in a pool or an ocean, but it should not be used for scuba diving, waterskiing, or other activities that involve exposure to deep water or high-velocity water.

Article Link: iPhone XS and XS Max Feature Upgraded IP68 Water and Dust Resistance
 

profets

macrumors 601
Mar 18, 2009
4,749
5,099
When the iPhone 7 got IP67, Apple Care didn’t cover water damage to the phone. It was really intended to help mitigate risk of the phone getting damage from accidental water submersion.

Does that change with IP68? The Series 2 Watch and newer is also IP68 and actually advertised and designed to be used submersed under water.
 
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33man

macrumors 6502
Sep 27, 2011
349
366
Why no one say a word about no landscape mode for home screen/dashboard... My 7plus is great as I put on the car holder in landscape mode...

Now the XS max seems only portrait mode, maybe due to faceid... So that shows no good new for iPads... Maybe that's why they were not announced yet...
 
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democracyrules

Suspended
Nov 18, 2016
997
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Glad i didn't wait, that massive screen and you still can't do picture in picture. Note 9 far more superior
Any Android devices are not absolutely not superior than iPhone in security feature. No reasonable and logical cyber security experts will ever recommend android. Open environment development of android operating devices make all android devices extremely vulnerable for hacking compared to iOS exclusive environment development.
Android devices might be cheaper but they sacrifice security element in them.
 
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unobtainium

macrumors 68020
Mar 27, 2011
2,414
3,568
So let's say I go kayaking and don't *plan* to roll my kayak, though that's always a possibility. Would it be safe to put an iPhone XS in my pocket? I considered buying an Apple Watch for kayaking but would rather just stick to my phone..
 
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QuarterSwede

macrumors G3
Oct 1, 2005
9,506
1,592
Colorado Springs, CO
So let's say I go kayaking and don't *plan* to roll my kayak, though that's always a possibility. Would it be safe to put an iPhone XS in my pocket? I considered buying an Apple Watch for kayaking but would rather just stick to my phone..
It’s rated at 2m for 30min under water. I’d still use a dry case or box personally. It would probably survive but do you want to take that chance? Besides if it comes out kayaking it’ll probably be lost. Put it in something that floats. This is coming from someone who lost his Apple Watch Series 3 to the Atlantic Ocean. The bands don’t float.
 
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69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
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In between a rock and a hard place
So let's say I go kayaking and don't *plan* to roll my kayak, though that's always a possibility. Would it be safe to put an iPhone XS in my pocket? I considered buying an Apple Watch for kayaking but would rather just stick to my phone..
The IP rating test is a static test done in controlled conditions and does not account for variable pressures associated with moving water of varying depths. IP68 is not designed to protect you from kayaking mishaps. Better safe than sorry. QuarterSwede has good advice.

It’s rated at 2m for 30min under water. I’d still use a dry case or box personally. It would probably survive but do you want to take that chance? Besides if it comes out kayaking it’ll probably be lost. Put it in something that floats. This is coming from someone who lost his Apple Watch Series 3 to the Atlantic Ocean. The bands don’t float.
This. It would probably survive. Unnecessarily risking a $1K+ phone on a 50/50 proposition seems...
 
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rydewnd2

macrumors regular
Apr 3, 2007
169
3
New York City
The IP rating test is a static test done in controlled conditions and does not account for variable pressures associated with moving water of varying depths. IP68 is not designed to protect you from kayaking mishaps. Better safe than sorry. QuarterSwede has good advice.


This. It would probably survive. Unnecessarily risking a $1K+ phone on a 50/50 proposition seems...

 
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campingsk8er

macrumors 6502a
Feb 4, 2011
512
196
Elizabethtown, PA
Iphone X was rated IP67 but I just used it in a swimming pool and its gone. Apple shouldn't advertise any feature that is not covered by warranty. Otherwise its fraud.
Yeah seriously, I had my 7 plus, took it in the shower, down thrill water slides, etc and it was fine. I take it in the pool for 5 seconds once, after 8 months and the taptic engine stopped working. Now with my X I took it in the shower, again water parks, and it was always fine. Last week I took it to Cesears Palace and dropped it in the pool for 5 seconds and caput it went.
 
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loybond

macrumors 6502a
Aug 1, 2010
732
524
The True North, Strong and Free
After the dramatic IP68 stuff they showed today, I better not hear of even one iPhone Xs dying in a swimming pool.

Yeah seriously, I had my 7 plus, took it in the shower, down thrill water slides, etc and it was fine. I take it in the pool for 5 seconds once, after 8 months and the taptic engine stopped working. Now with my X I took it in the shower, again water parks, and it was always fine. Last week I took it to Cesears Palace and dropped it in the pool for 5 seconds and caput it went.
 
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DeepIn2U

macrumors G3
May 30, 2002
8,662
3,258
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Nope.

This is straight up BS marketing using an industry standard rating yet Apple is using their own scapegoat and NOT fully backing this standard rating from warranty!!

To me this is false advertisement and should be barred form using this standard. Glue is not a good way to standardize nor test on this rating. Glue under heat/cold will wear or dry up over time hence why Apple is warning against hr rating over time. Most users, especially now with eSIM and potential carrier support, rarely remove the SIM card often.
[doublepost=1536804345][/doublepost]
The IP rating test is a static test done in controlled conditions and does not account for variable pressures associated with moving water of varying depths. IP68 is not designed to protect you from kayaking mishaps.

/QUOTE]

Actually you’re slightly incorrect. It is a standard test and it in fact DOES test for variable pressures - dust it does. Water is water and I’m sure there is testing as well for pressure.

Source & Facts: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/IP_Code


A device which is compliant with IPX7, covering immersion in water, need not be compliant with IPX5 or IPX6, covering exposure to water jets.

IPx6 (in the table of the source)
Test duration: 1 minute per square meter for at least 3 minutes

Water volume: 100 litres per minute
Pressure: 100 kPa at distance of 3 m[\QUOTE]

Looks like pressure testing to me for the standard. Where on earth did you get this kayaking crap?
 
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