iPod Classic 160GB which generation

Discussion in 'iPod' started by Zimmy68, Jan 24, 2014.

  1. Zimmy68 macrumors 65816

    Zimmy68

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    #1
    I picked up a newish iPod Classic 7th generation to replace my broken one.
    I decided to put it on ebay to sell for parts to recover some of the cost.
    It is a silver 160GB.
    How do I tell which generation it is?
    Did the 5th generation have 160GB?
    The new one is thinner then the old one.

    I assume it is a 6th generation but want to make sure.

    Thanks.
     
  2. puma1552 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #2
    If it's 160 gb and it's thin, it's a 7th gen. The 7th gen has been out since 2009, unchanged.

    80GB or the fat dual platter 160 GB classic: 6th generation
    120GB classic: 6.5 generation
    160GB classic: 7th generation
     
  3. Zimmy68 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Zimmy68

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    #3
    Not sure I understand.

    I have both iPods in hand.

    The old one is 160GB, Silver and thicker then the new Silver 160GB Classic.

    I assumed it was a 6th generation because, I thought, Apple didn't include the 160GB option until the 6th/7th gen.

    But it is almost double the thickness of my new 7th gen model.

    The new one seems to have newer software and (a huge bonus for me) works with headphone mic controls.

    I guess it doesn't matter, I just excluded that information from my eBay listing.
    I can see someone buying it for parts and demanding a refund when they thought they were getting a specific version.
     
  4. puma1552 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #4
    The fat 160 GB one is the 6th generation; it is fat because it has a dual platter hard drive.

    The thin 160 GB model is the 2009+ 7th generation model, with a single platter hard drive (which is why it is thin).

    They originally had the fat 160 GB dual platter as a 6th generation, but then in the 6.5 generation they dropped the dual platter 160 gig model because it was too slow due to the dual platters, so then when technology allowed, they reintroduced a 160 gig model as a 7th generation, this time as a single platter, thinner model.
     
  5. Zimmy68 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Zimmy68

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
  6. wilsonlaidlaw macrumors 6502

    wilsonlaidlaw

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2008
    #6
    Buy iPod Classics while you can?

    After Tim Cook’s recent statement about iPods being a declining business, I wonder if it makes sense to buy a couple of spare Gen 7 Classics to tuck them away. The Gen 5.5 I use in my car and the Gen 6 I use as a portable music source are both getting a bit long in the tooth. I just wonder how much longer Apple will keep selling them for.

    For both of the two above scenarios, there is no workable alternative. The metro-centric view that everything revolves round “the cloud”, cheerfully ignores that in a large part of the world away from urban California, mobile internet connections are slow, unreliable and expensive.
     
  7. Max Dread macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2014
    #7
    Would there be any potential problems with storing an iPod unused for long lengths of time? Could it be detrimental to the HD?

    I have thought along your lines too, but this is one of the things which has made me wonder whether it is such a good idea...
     
  8. Bear macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Sol III - Terra
    #8
    Since the iPod classic is always drawing on the battery, every so often you should charge the battery up to full with a wall charger. I found on my old iPod Color, that if I didn't use it for a month, it was at less than 50%. Do not let the iPod get down to a drained battery - this is what is bad for it.

    As for the HD, just storing it won't be bad. You might want to check the HD and the iPod in general when you get it and then at about 11 months while you still have a warranty to cover repairs.
     
  9. Max Dread macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2014
    #9
    Nice one, thanks for that.

    I'm new to iPods and still researching/reading. Battery life is something I have on my "to look into" list. I kinda guessed that an iPod would be like a laptop or mobile and the best thing for the battery would be to always run it through full cycles (from fully charged to drained, round and round and round). Sounds like I've got that wrong then???
     
  10. Bear macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Sol III - Terra
    #10
    Only need to do a full cycle really to calibrate battery percent/time left which of course the iPod classic doesn't have.
     
  11. wilsonlaidlaw macrumors 6502

    wilsonlaidlaw

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2008
    #11
    Storing iPods

    I think that you should use your stored iPods from time to time. It is not only an electronic device but a mechanical one. Electrolytic capacitors deteriorate if not used over a fairly short time (when I get back to my French house in late spring after 7 months away, the hifi sounds less than optimum for the first couple of days until the various very large capacitors reform). I would think the rotating discs in the internal HD would also become sluggish if not used for a long period. It is essential that this rotates at a very exact speed. As others have commented, the lithium cells benefit from the occasional partial charge.
     
  12. Max Dread macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2014
    #12
    @wilsonlaidlaw. What you say is what my unfounded instincts were telling me....
     

Share This Page