iPod touch logic board

Discussion in 'iPod touch' started by DarkRevenant, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. DarkRevenant macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    #1
    Ok, so, the pins on the bottom port of my iPod touch have become bent/broken. I would like to repair it, and that particular port is part of the logic board (I believe so, tell me if im wrong). In theory I suppose it would be possible to desolder/resolder another working port replacing the old one, however I don't think that would be possible. I've done some googling but haven't found a site that sells the logic boards. Does anyone know where I could buy a new one to install, or possibly another solution to my problem? Thanks for looking.
     
  2. rgarjr macrumors 603

    rgarjr

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Location:
    Southern Cal
    #2
    What gen touch do you have? I just checked ifixit.com and they don't have any logic boards for sale. Have u tried ebay?
     
  3. DarkRevenant thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    #3
    3rd generation 32gb touch. I was also wondering if it would work if I bought a logic board for a unit with lesser capacity (8 gb or 16gb) would it still work?
     
  4. rgarjr macrumors 603

    rgarjr

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Location:
    Southern Cal
    #4
    It'll probably work but you will have less storage space after. Depending how much they go for, might be better to get a new touch.
     
  5. MaxBurn macrumors 65816

    MaxBurn

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2010
    #5
    Logic board is about the one thing you can't buy and replace.

    See if you can find a similar one with a smashed screen on ebay or something?
     
  6. DarkRevenant thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    #6
    And take the logic board from the busted one or take the screen from my newer one?

    And can anyone comment on whether it would be possible to desolder/resolder a new port?
     
  7. rgarjr macrumors 603

    rgarjr

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Location:
    Southern Cal
    #7
    That depends on how good your soldering skills are.. or take it somewhere and see if they can do it.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. DarkRevenant thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    #8
    If I were to try and rob a port from another ipod, am I correct in assuming it would not have to match the specifications of my ipod? (meaning an 8, 16, or 32 gb model), but it would need to be of the same generation?
     
  9. MaxBurn macrumors 65816

    MaxBurn

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2010
    #9
    Soldering micro SMT takes some skills and expensive equipment. Like a low powered microscope. Had that stuff when I was in the service and it really isn't a DIY job.
     
  10. rgarjr macrumors 603

    rgarjr

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Location:
    Southern Cal
    #10
    I agree, if you don't have the equipment for it or the skills, don't try it.
     
  11. DarkRevenant thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    #11
    I appreciate the concern but here is how I view it:
    If I screw the ipod up more than it is now I've lost nothing; the port doesn't recognize anything plugged into it and my ipod is just a paper weight right now. I wouldn't pay the $150 out of warranty repair apple wants to charge anyways, so I may as well take a risk at fixing my ipod cheap (for like 10 bucks) because no matter what if I choose to buy a new one I can still get the 10% off apple offers if you give them an old iPod with the purchase of a new one.

    I know I don't have experience with micro soldering, but I can solder well otherwise, and this stuff is very interesting to me; I'm in my 3rd year of a computer engineering major.

    All that being said, if I manage to locate a 30 pin connector from any 3rd generation ipod touch, would it theoretically work on mine?
     
  12. Matth345 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2010
    #12
    Tbf that looks alot easier to solder than i had expected, you will however need some tools to take the one off however it would be easy to solder on a new one with a small solder tip and microscope.
     

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