IPv6 activation on Airport Extreme

mentaluproar

macrumors 68000
Original poster
May 25, 2010
1,731
130
Ohio, USA
I'm confused by the airport utility modes for IPv6. I'm looking for which one gives each computer on the network a unique IPv6 address that is seen over the WAN, not just internally. What does each option do and how is it different from the others?
 

zaphoyd

macrumors regular
Jun 25, 2002
121
31
Wisconsin/Illinois
Note: all of these settings are available only via the Airport software version 5.6. You can download this separately and run it along side the 6.0 software. Make sure your base station is fully patched. Not all base station hardware supports all features even with the latest software.

Link Local only
The base station will auto configure itself with a link local address (fe80::/64). This means you will be able to access the base station via its Link local address on the LAN side.

Host
The base station will configure itself as a host on the IPv6 internet. This will allow you to access the base station via a global scope address. In automatic mode it will get this address by listening for router advertisements and configuring itself accordingly. In manual mode you can specify a static IP for the base station and its next hop router.

Tunnel
The base station will configure itself as the endpoint of a tunnel between your LAN and the IPv6 internet by tunneling packets over the IPv4 internet. This is useful if your ISP does not provide native IPv6. Automatic will use anonymous 6to4 relays to provide tunneling. (this is not recommended unless you absolutely need to access IPv6 only services and have no other choice). Manually lets you specify the settings for a dedicated a 6in4 tunnel. This sort of tunnel is more reliable but still can have higher latency than native IPv4 or IPv6. You will need to sign up with a tunnel broker (tunnel broker.net or sixxs.net are examples) to get the settings to enter. In this mode your base station will have a global scope address itself and will use RA to distribute addresses from your tunnel prefix to hosts on your network. All devices on your network will get unique global IPv6 addresses.

Router (only supported on simultaneous dual band versions)
The base station will configure itself as a router on the IPv6 internet and distribute an IPv6 prefix assigned by your ISP to your LAN. This is the recommended setting if your ISP supports IPv6. All machines on your LAN will get unique global IPv6 addresses. Note: This mode does not work when the base station connects to your ISP via PPPoE.

In Tunnel and Router mode (where global addresses are distributed) you have the option of blocking incoming connections. This enables the stateful firewall for IPv6 and will prevent you (and anyone else) from accessing devices on your network from outside your network. If you enable this another IPv6 Firewall tab will appear to let you configure exceptions.
 
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RockinRico

macrumors newbie
Dec 7, 2011
5
0
Router
... Note: This mode does not work when the base station connects to your ISP via PPPoE.
Thanks for the overall explanation, Zaphoyd. Regarding this PPPoE issue, I've been googling around and I still can't find solid information on why it is so. Would you have a link to spare?
 
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sonofmof

macrumors member
Sep 26, 2005
92
0
UK
Router (only supported on simultaneous dual band versions)
The base station will configure itself as a router on the IPv6 internet and distribute an IPv6 prefix assigned by your ISP to your LAN. This is the recommended setting if your ISP supports IPv6. All machines on your LAN will get unique global IPv6 addresses. Note: This mode does not work when the base station connects to your ISP via PPPoE.


Does the new Express do this Routing too ??
 
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throAU

macrumors 603
Feb 13, 2012
5,786
2,971
Perth, Western Australia
It is worth noting that IPv6 support in the airport extreme is BROKEN if you have native IPv6 connectivity, depending how it has been implemented.

It doesn't work. I have native through my ISP (Internode) and the Airport Extreme can't use it, using PPPoE.
 
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mentaluproar

macrumors 68000
Original poster
May 25, 2010
1,731
130
Ohio, USA
It is worth noting that IPv6 support in the airport extreme is BROKEN if you have native IPv6 connectivity, depending how it has been implemented.

It doesn't work. I have native through my ISP (Internode) and the Airport Extreme can't use it, using PPPoE.
There are many things at apple that remain unaddressed. They need another tightly-wound pain in the ass in charge.

I'm avaliable.
 
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ctyrider

macrumors 6502a
Jul 15, 2012
975
499
It is worth noting that IPv6 support in the airport extreme is BROKEN if you have native IPv6 connectivity, depending how it has been implemented.

It doesn't work. I have native through my ISP (Internode) and the Airport Extreme can't use it, using PPPoE.
Native IPv6 working great here with Comcast.. I am connected over Ethernet.
 
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throAU

macrumors 603
Feb 13, 2012
5,786
2,971
Perth, Western Australia
Native IPv6 working great here with Comcast.. I am connected over Ethernet.
Yup.

It works over ethernet (I have IPv6 at home via a Cisco and then use ethernet to the Airport so it can do IPv6).

But apple screwed the pooch with their implementation of PPPoE for cable/dsl customers. It won't work with native IPv6 over cable or DSL for those who connect via PPPoE
 
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