Irish Citizenship

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by allenmertes, Jul 20, 2007.

  1. allenmertes macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2005
    Location:
    South Bend, IN
    #1
    I have recently graduated from college and have seriously been considering a move to Ireland. I would really love to work in the U.S. for a few years, save a lot of money, and then just head over there and see what happens. I have been doing some research into gaining Irish citizenship and it sounds quite difficult. I am of Irish heritage, (my mom's maiden name is Kilian:) ) but my parents and grandparents were born in the U.S. My great-grandparents were born in Ireland.

    It also sounds quite difficult to get a work permit without a firm job offer from a company willing to sponsor me. Other than marrying an Irish girl, does anyone know of any other ways of making the move? Am I missing something entirely? Thanks for the advice.
     
  2. OutThere macrumors 603

    OutThere

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Location:
    NYC
    #2
    Usually when you move to another country you start out getting a visa to work there, get a job, then work towards citizenship once you're there.

    I don't know the specifics about Ireland, however that's how it usually works. It's also safer to go there, live and work for a while so you know if you really want to be a citizen, or if it just sounded good before you tried it out for real.
     
  3. allenmertes thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 1, 2005
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    South Bend, IN
    #3
    Well, apparently U.S. citizens don't need a visa to travel to Ireland. But in order to work in Ireland, I would need a work permit- which is difficult to get. It sounds as though you either need a firm job offer, or you need to be a doctor, lawyer, etc.
     
  4. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
    Location:
    Penryn
    #4
    The Irish economy is booming right now, you might be better off going there now especially since the dollar has lost a lot of value the past few years. If I were you I'd rather be earning Euros than dollars.

    There's a big difference between residency and citizenship. Ireland requires a five year residency before you can apply for citizenship.

    The reality is the Irish economy is booming and if you have a viable degree or minimal job skills, you could probably find a job pretty easy. I'd recommend saving up enough to live on for 3 months, go over there and start looking for a job. You'll probably find one quickly.

    The longer you put it off, the less likely it will happen!
     
  5. allenmertes thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 1, 2005
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    South Bend, IN
    #5
    Are you aware of the laws concerning residency? Would it be an issue/hassle for me to move there and get an apartment/job? Is the work permit issue a big deal, or are there ways around it?
     
  6. j26 macrumors 65832

    j26

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    Mar 30, 2005
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    Paddyland
    #6
    This site has a decent bit of information and some links on to qualification recognition, and work permits etc.
     
  7. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
    Location:
    Penryn
    #7
    Link

    That's another site that lists some of the nuts and bolts requirements.

    If you have a degree, it looks as though you probably have a decent chance of finding a job. Finding a job there is just like finding one here. You spend a lot of time pounding the pavement, reading the want ads, contacting employment agencies, etc. The degree is all fine and dandy but it's the person they're hiring, not the degree.

    It won't necessarily be easy but the best things in life rarely are.

    Save some money, start looking now and go over for 3 months. Even if you don't find something now, the trip alone will be worth it as you'll discover what it is that employers are looking for and have a better feel for Ireland in general.

    It's easy to get discouraged by bureaucracy but if you don't try, you'll always wonder what it would have been like if you had.
     
  8. Kamera RAWr macrumors 65816

    Kamera RAWr

    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    Location:
    I'm where I need to be
    #8
    Being a college graduate will probably help you a bit. Seems many western European countries are kinda hard to get into... but if you're and educated or skilled person, its a little easier. You could see about those companies that find jobs for people and see if they might be able to help you. Just curious... what is your degree in?
     
  9. allenmertes thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2005
    Location:
    South Bend, IN
    #9
    Thanks for the great information j26 and Ugg. It makes it seem a little more feasible after reading over some of that.

    Small-business management. Not sure how great the demand would be, but it's a fairly general business degree which should be flexible.
     

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