Is an all "N" WiFi network better than mixed?

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by mpls, Mar 30, 2011.

  1. mpls macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    #1
    I currently have all "N" capable devices on my wifi network, except for a "g" Airport Express. Will upgrading that AE to "N" improve overall throughput on my network? I'm talking theoretically, not about whether I'm likely to notice or not.

    - 2 dual band Airport Extremes
    - 1 "N" AExpress
    - 1 "g" AExpress
    - 3 macs ("N")
    - iPad
    - iPhone 4
     
  2. alust2013 macrumors 601

    alust2013

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Location:
    On the fence
    #2
    Only to the devices that connect to the g express. However, only fiber optic networks can provide speeds that exceed g, and those aren't super common yet
     
  3. mpls thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    #3
    So having my AExtreme configured as 802.11n (5GHz)/ 802.11n (2.4GHz) is no better than 802.11n (5GHz)/ b/g/n (2.4GHz) ?

    I don't understand the comment about fiber... lots of things are faster than "g" (eg, 802.11n, gigabit)
     
  4. alust2013 macrumors 601

    alust2013

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Location:
    On the fence
    #4
    If you allow it to have other configurations, it will pick the highest speed available. While n, gigabit ethernet, and even 10/100 ethernet are even faster link speed than g, ISPs often don't provide connections that can saturate a g network. The only ISPs I know of that provide service fast enough to take advantage of n are fiber optic.
     
  5. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #5
    Some devices can't operate at 5GHz. I had my network set to N (5GHz) and my wireless printer wouldn't connect. Changed it to 2.4GHz and it connected right away.
    Yes, but it's more than ISPs and internet connection speed. In the local wireless network, N speeds are faster than G speeds. If all devices are N, the network will run faster than it would at G, as far as data transfers within the network.
     

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