Is Apple ignoring us, or just knows better

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by Stephen73, Aug 11, 2009.

  1. Stephen73 macrumors newbie

    Stephen73

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2009
    #1
    I can't help feeling that I'm seeing similar posting across several forums, that Apple is missing the mark in getting computing products to us that we really want.

    There are requests for a more powerful Mac Mini, an iMac without the monitor and cheeper MacPro entry levels.

    These requests might just be all wanting the same thing... a more traditional & affordable computer. We beg and plead and nothing happens. Apple seems to know best and tells us what models will be available for us to chose from. We're starting to get pushed towards making a Hackintosh... not good when so much of Apple's growth comes from us having sexy products on our desks or in our laptop bags as our friends/collegues/clients drool at them. We are the members of the Mac Cult and we're doing the converting at street level.

    Not only is it a case of wrong models, but there seems to be an enormous shift in corporate focus away from professional computing. It's all about iPods, iPhones, iTunes, iLife and PowerBooks. Products for professional just seem to get dragged along in tow. Apple computers seem to be for the sole purpose of loading songs onto iPods. (alternatively they are for high-end video editing & broadcast)

    I'm a graphic designer of 14 years and have always worked on Apple Macs. It used to make awesome professional graphics products and was recognised as such. Now, they are known for beautiful, expensive, desirable consumer electronics. What's next? the iWatch, iClock, iHiFi, iRadio, iScooter, iKariokie, iTorch, iBinoculars, iScopes, iLamp?

    I fully understand that Apple needs to make money and these consumer products are hugely popular and profitable, but is it so difficult to give in once or twice and give their oldest client base something we're all ready and waiting to spend money on?

    Please don't forget us professionals with lower power demands on the road to greatness. We need versatility first, then stunning design. Versatility & capability makes us need a Mac, the design makes us want one. Consumers have it the other way around because they want to show off to their friends. We need to add an extra card to control an external device, to be able to add a few more hard drives and use a monitor of our choice to be really colour accurate, have decent power and leave all the complexities of laptop components alone, all without having to buy a high-end server/video editing station.

    Also, Apple seems to forget that there is a target market outside of the USA. I'm in South Africa and can't even buy the $20 MPEG-2 playback plug in for Quicktime as advertised on Apple's website. We can't get it here, and not allowed to buy it of www.apple.com so I'm being told my only option is to buy Final Cut Pro suite at $1000 as it's bundled with it. That's not a solution. Why is distribution of products so difficult? Especially in my case when it's something that can be downloaded. Maybe Apple needs to cut some red tape or streamline a few departments.

    If the argument that Apple is expensive in the USA is common, you must know what it's like in the rest of the world. Compare the prices on Apple.com against the prices on Apple.co.uk – keeping the exchange rate in mind. It's about 20% more in the UK, and everywhere else. (Funny how Dell's prices are pretty much the same worldwide). I'm especially amazed with this since Apples are now made in China. We have excelent trading agreements with China and yet our Apples all come from France via the the UK/USA. This all hikes the pricing up making the computers here rediculous. When I say I want a Mac without a monitor on a forum, I glibly get told to get a Mac Pro (after all, I am a professional). Thanks, but the price of the base MacPro is what my graphic design studio of 2 designers turns over in 2 months. Assume that I'm putting aside 10% of this for upgrading/replacing and it'll take my company 2 years to pay just one off – also assuming I never have a print job go bad or lose a client. This why I still have two G4s playing crucial roles in my studio.

    Come now Apple, I'm feeling like a forgotten client, in a forgotten industry, in a forgotten continent.

    Please hear my lone, little voice. You'll be no less of a leader by giving into your followers.

    .
     
  2. MTI macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    #2
    Your last sentence shows that you understand the situation . . . most consumers, the ones that drive the economics of the organization, are followers, not the leaders. Before anyone starts up with the "customer is the priority" banter . . . keep in mind that we, as Apple product consumers, really don't live in a world of "open source" hardware, frankly it's quite the opposite.

    But Stephen, back to you. How long have you had these feelings of being ignor . . . oh, hold that thought, I have to go respond to another thread . . .
     
  3. liptonlover macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2008
    #3
    I read your whole post, and it's easy to answer. Apple doesn't pander to their current/old customers; they create a product that they think will attract customers, those people buy their products, and they're happy. End of story.

    Nate
     
  4. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #4
    Just knows better...

    Four facts to consider that go hand-in-hand:

    1. Apple is a publicly traded company with shareholders.
    2. The people that make decisions at Apple are heavily compensated with stock.
    3. High-margin up-market products equate to significant profits.
    4. Shareholders (and decision makers compensated with stock) like significant profits

    In support of point #3/#4...
    - Apple's market capitalization is now greater than that of Dell and HP combined.
    - Apple's profit exceed both Dell and HP with less than 10% market share
    - Apple is the only PC company who is experiencing growth in the last couple of quarters compared to others (Microsoft, Dell, HP)

    If people want a low-cost entry level computer, they really should just buy a Dell or HP - there are tons to choose from. Apple, it's shareholders, and it's decision makers do not want their unprofitable business.
     

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