is Core 2 Duo worth 400 more dollar on an MBP?

sartajc

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 8, 2007
51
0
i have a choice:

MPB core 1 duo 1gb: 1150 (im gonna upgrade to 2gb for about 100 extra)

MPB core 2 duo 2gb : 1600ish

both will be 2gb RAM.

Im gonna use final cut express, logic pro, and upgrade to Leapord.

but im strapped on money (im a college student).

so my question is: is core 2 really worth the extra money on Macbooks? is 64bit really that important? (i will be using this laptop for 2-3 years btw).

no, i dont do gaming and i dont do 3d graphics, but i do studio quality movie making, imaging, and music.
 

bousozoku

Moderator emeritus
Jun 25, 2002
13,951
3
Gone but not forgotten.
Core 2 Duo is not worth it unless it has the Santa Rosa support chipset, which is in the current 2.2 and 2.4 GHz machines.

Core 2 Duo is supposedly somewhat faster and somewhat more conservative of power but not that much, I believe. You could buy another battery for the money you save.
 

netdog

macrumors 603
Feb 6, 2006
5,762
36
London
Very little is so cool about Santa Rosa as currently implemented in the MBP, particularly as it has a dedicated graphics processor anyway. It wasn't a big bump for the MBP. The CD to C2D was actually a much larger leap, but rest assured that unless you are running Pro apps, the CD will run Leopard beautifully. In fact, it will run Pro apps beautifully too.
 

Osarkon

macrumors 68020
Aug 30, 2006
2,161
4
Wales
I'd go for the Core Duo. I doubt you'll notice much difference, I know when I've compared my Core Duo macbook to a friends Core 2 Duo I haven't noticed the difference.

Besides, the money you save can go towards the RAM and then you have a macbook pro with 2gig of ram with money left over.
 

emotion

macrumors 68040
Mar 29, 2004
3,186
3
Manchester, UK
I wouldn't touch an early MBP (core duo). There's not a huge advantage to c2d but just the fact the later machines had less trouble than the early mbps makes the decision for c2d an easy one.
 

dollystereo

macrumors 6502a
Oct 6, 2004
899
104
France
I have an early CD MBP, maxed out, 2gb ram and 200GB 7.2k rpm, its ultra fast. I do a lot of FCP with a 23" ACD and it works great. In terms of speed, you will no see the difference. The C2D MBP is a 64 bit processor, and can handle more than 4gb fo ram, but the logic board cant. So whats upp... Go for the CDMBP.
 

0098386

Suspended
Jan 18, 2005
21,552
2,886
I wouldn't touch an early MBP (core duo). There's not a huge advantage to c2d but just the fact the later machines had less trouble than the early mbps makes the decision for c2d an easy one.
OP would be wise to listen to this :)
The later revisions iron out problems, it's always worth considering.
But if I somehow knew that the CD would be perfectly okay as far as bugs go - I'd settle for that.
 

iSee

macrumors 68040
Oct 25, 2004
3,524
253
Here're some benchmarks: http://www.barefeats.com/mbcd6.html
(Comparing a MBP CD 2.16 to a MBP CD2 2.33--I'm not sure which specific clock speeds you are looking at.)

The CD2 has a nice bump in speed, but it isn't exactly leaving the CD in the dust. I'd go for the CD. It's a real powerhouse and the price is very good.
 

panzer06

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2006
3,016
71
Kilrath
OP would be wise to listen to this :)
The later revisions iron out problems, it's always worth considering.
But if I somehow knew that the CD would be perfectly okay as far as bugs go - I'd settle for that.
If its a refurb from Apple it is most likely ok, however, buying an early MBP CD used from a random consumer is a big risk.

Cheers,
 

iSee

macrumors 68040
Oct 25, 2004
3,524
253
Bull-loney

OK, I've got to call you out on this because you are starting to pile on here:

Are you guys basing this on anything besides anecdotes you picked up MR (NOT the way to get a realistic idea of what's going on)?

I'm speaking as someone who owns an early MBP CD that works flawlessly (except the battery, which Apple recalled and replaced). You guys have to back up these claims with something.



I wouldn't touch an early MBP (core duo). There's not a huge advantage to c2d but just the fact the later machines had less trouble than the early mbps makes the decision for c2d an easy one.
OP would be wise to listen to this :)
The later revisions iron out problems, it's always worth considering.
But if I somehow knew that the CD would be perfectly okay as far as bugs go - I'd settle for that.
If its a refurb from Apple it is most likely ok, however, buying an early MBP CD used from a random consumer is a big risk.

Cheers,
 

emotion

macrumors 68040
Mar 29, 2004
3,186
3
Manchester, UK
OK, I've got to call you out on this because you are starting to pile on here:

Are you guys basing this on anything besides anecdotes you picked up MR (NOT the way to get a realistic idea of what's going on)?

I'm speaking as someone who owns an early MBP CD that works flawlessly (except the battery, which Apple recalled and replaced). You guys have to back up these claims with something.
I work at a large UK university with collaborators all over the world who have these machines. The early machines had noise problems from various components and run very hot (different air vents). The battery life is not that good either.

I have also pulled experience from people all over the internet when I deem it valid.

What I say above is what I would do. That is all.

I do have exerience of flawed Rev A devices being usable though, in that my current work machine is a Rev A Powerbook 12" (soon to be replaced by a 2.2GHz mbp). I also had a rev c powerbook and the difference in refinement in those was night and day.
 

FoxyKaye

macrumors 68000
OK, well, here's one story for you - our Executive Director bought a MacBook when they were first released (the first CD model). In the time that she's owned it, it has had the motherboard replaced twice, hard drive completely fail after 6 months of ownership, and now has display problems.

Her assistant also bought an early CD model MacBook - hers has been in the shop for motherboard/graphics problems, and for wireless problems.
 

weckart

macrumors 601
Nov 7, 2004
4,694
1,684
OK, I've got to call you out on this because you are starting to pile on here:

Are you guys basing this on anything besides anecdotes you picked up MR (NOT the way to get a realistic idea of what's going on)?
Have you ever been to the Apple.com forums? They got pretty much heated, too.

I'm speaking as someone who owns an early MBP CD that works flawlessly (except the battery, which Apple recalled and replaced).
Sounds like a nice little anecdote at MR.


To the original poster, the $400 also buys you dual-layer burning and a FW800 socket, if that is important to you.
 

phungy

macrumors 68020
Dec 5, 2006
2,409
6
FL/NY/TX
If you do decide to get the Core Duo, I'd buy it from the Apple refurb store as any issues with it before are all corrected now with "new" warranty. I'm not sure if they still have those anymore though...
 

iSee

macrumors 68040
Oct 25, 2004
3,524
253
...
Sounds like a nice little anecdote at MR.
Ha, ha, got me there.

...MacBook...MacBook...
The OP (and I) was talking about Macbook Pros, not Macbooks.

I realize hard info isn't easy to come by since Apple isn't exactly releasing repair stats, but I think sometimes people are just reading posts about MBPs, repeating what they've read in new posts, and the cycle repeats.

I don't want to scare the OP (or others) off a good computer that might be more affordable for him or her.
 

sartajc

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 8, 2007
51
0
Umm..

he replaced the battery cause of the recall.

I REALLY wanted the new firewire (im a musician), but im pretty sure i can live without it as i dont think pro tools uses firewire 8000 (or whatever it is).

If the macbooks back then were so bad, then im not sure if I want it.

however, as one poster said, his mbp works fine.

its nice to know CR1 is good to go, but now im confused about the different firewire, and the bugs.
 

GreatDrok

macrumors 6502a
May 1, 2006
561
22
New Zealand
I have a Rev A MBP 2.0 Ghz bought in April 2006. I maxed the RAM and it has had two batteries (one recalled, second failed) but other than that it is fine.

Originally it was extremely hot and made funny noises. Updates to the firmware helped but I still thought it was too hot so I installed Fan Control which allows me to set the fan speed profile a bit better. It runs at a cool 45C most of the time with fans bimbling along at about 2000rpm. I also installed ShhMBP because mine had that funny buzzing noise. With these two tweaks it is perfect.

I also have a Rev A iBook and a Rev A Mac mini G4. All of them are perfect. YMMV.
 

booksacool1

macrumors 6502
Oct 17, 2004
293
1
Australia
I'd go for the C2D.
Why?

Well there were a few 'bugs' with the CD's.
For one some are limited to 2gb. At least they don't seem to support 2gb sticks.
And then the x1600 is underclocked in a lot of them.

CPU performance wise, there's not much difference. More cache, slightly higher clocks, 64bit support, couple of other differences. Just remember, for some reason the CPU's on mac laptops are NOT socketed. They are soldered onto the motherboard = non upgradable.
 

alembic

macrumors regular
Oct 13, 2005
162
19
MacBook/MacBook Pro Reliability Survey

Macintouch ran a survey late last year. Of course it doesn't include the latest LED models but there were definite trends between CD and C2D models.
 

moez

macrumors regular
Jun 6, 2007
109
0
Another way to look at it...

Another thing you might want to consider:

How long do u intend to keep this MBP for. If its for a year or two, go for CD. However, if you plan on using it for more than 2 years, I would rather buy a C2D which has 64 bit support for RAM options among other things.

Also, just so ud know, RAM is a user servicable part in MBP so it would void your warranty!!
 

Squonk

macrumors 65816
Mar 15, 2005
1,366
14
Another thing you might want to consider:

How long do u intend to keep this MBP for. If its for a year or two, go for CD. However, if you plan on using it for more than 2 years, I would rather buy a C2D which has 64 bit support for RAM options among other things.

Also, just so ud know, RAM is a user servicable part in MBP so it would void your warranty!!
RAM is user serviceable and will NOT void the warranty. :D
 

heldtbt

macrumors newbie
Aug 30, 2007
11
0
You should also know that Final Cut Studio 2 is not compatible with computers with the integrated video card... aka: the MacBook.