Is extra 0.2 GHz worth it?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by nervousrhino, Nov 30, 2014.

  1. nervousrhino macrumors newbie

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    Nov 30, 2014
    #1
    Hi, I'm looking to buy a MacBook Pro and will mainly use it for schoolwork, slight photo editing, monotonous things like web browsing and maybe minor games if possible.

    The CPU choices I have are: 2.6GHz Dual-core Intel Core i5, Turbo Boost up to 3.1GHz.

    But for £70 more I could upgrade to 2.8GHz Dual-core Intel Core i5, Turbo Boost up to 3.3GHz.

    Is it worth the £70 upgrade? For some reason the CPU concerns me as I'm a pessimistic person and I don't want any issues/regrets.

    Thanks

    (Unless somebody can find me a MacBook with an even better CPU, 8GB RAM and at least 256GB for £1000 max haha)
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #2
    For the workload you described, and for the vast majority of users, no, it's not worth the upgrade. You won't see any difference in performance between the two in regular use. You're better off spending money on extra storage or other accessories. Most users never come anywhere close to the performance limits of the CPU.
     
  3. nervousrhino thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Nov 30, 2014
    #3
    Thanks. Is the original CPU okay though? On my main PC it's 3.2 GHz rising to 3.6 and I'm just scared that the CPU on the Mac might not be too good. (I'm no expert, this will be my first Mac).
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #4
    Yes, the CPU in any Mac model made in recent years will handle your proposed workload with ease. CPU isn't the most noticeable area to address when looking for performance, with rare exceptions. You'll notice much more from adequate RAM and a lot more by moving from a HDD to a SSD.

    This may help:
     
  5. leman macrumors 604

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    Oct 14, 2008
    #5
    1. No, its not worth it.
    2. The Intel CPUs used in Macs are the same as one's used in the PC. So it depends on what CPU you have in your PC. If your PC has Haswell or Ivy Bridge CPU, then it will be faster. Which is not a big surprise, given that we are talking about desktop vs laptop here.
     
  6. nervousrhino thread starter macrumors newbie

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  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #7
    Yes, it is. I just don't know if you had an SSD in your PC. If you didn't, you'll notice a significant boost in performance over your PC.
     
  8. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #8
  9. nervousrhino thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Nov 30, 2014
    #9
    Thanks guys. Think I won't get the upgrade. And my PC does have a HDD yeah. I have 8GB RAM so hopefully performance won't be an issue. One final thing, is 256GB SSD enough? I'll mainly be storing documents and downloading the odd minor game, and store most things to Dropbox.
     
  10. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #10
    Remember that if you sync your Dropbox onto your computer, you will need space on your internal drive for that. It's been my experience that no matter how much internal storage I start with, I always end up wishing I had more. I recommend you buy as much internal storage as you can afford. I've never heard any complaints from anyone that they had too much free space on their internal drive; only that they didn't have enough. Also remember that not all of that 256GB will be available for your user files.
     
  11. nervousrhino thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #11
    Does the SSD size affect the performance at all?
     
  12. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #12
    No, it doesn't.
     
  13. nervousrhino thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Nov 30, 2014
  14. nervousrhino thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Nov 30, 2014
    #14
    In the end I opted for this:

    2.8GHz Dual-core Intel Core i5, Turbo Boost up to 3.3GHz
    8GB 1600MHz DDR3L SDRAM
    512GB PCIe-based Flash Storage

    Is that good? (I didn't take the upgrade, it's a different deal)
     
  15. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    Oct 10, 2013
    #15
    Didn't know this existed -awesome post! :)

    ----------

    Why are you so anxious about performance? The stuff you do with your macbook can be done on any old iPhone.
     
  16. poiihy macrumors 68020

    poiihy

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    #16
    I used to complain that I had too much free space :p

    ----------

    It's a bit overkill for you IMO...
     
  17. poematik13 macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 5, 2014
    #17
    Yes it does. Larger SSD's tend to be faster. For example, the 1TB PCI-E ssd in new apple machines is much faster than the 256 and 512 variants.

    The Samsung 840 EVO's are also slightly faster in the larger variants too.
     
  18. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #18
    Not according to these benchmarks: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ssd-recommendation-benchmark,3269.html

    According to that, there is very little difference at all, with smaller capacity drives being slightly faster in many instances, including with the Samsung 840 EVO. It appears that in some cases, higher capacity = higher performance, and in other cases, the reverse is true. It comes down to comparing specific drive models in specific capacities to know for certain, and even then, the difference will be affected by what size files are being read/written. Most users would never perceive any difference.

    The most accurate statement would be that performance can vary between capacities, models and brands of SSDs, but such variances will be minor, compared to the gap in performance between any HDD and any SSD.
     
  19. poematik13 macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 5, 2014
    #19
    right, its different between manufacturers, with differences ranging from dramatic to nothing at all.

    But there is a difference with the apple SSD's, barefeats has charts on it. Something to do with the double-width (relative to the smaller capacities) bus size on the 1TB modules.
     
  20. Hieveryone macrumors 68030

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    Apr 11, 2014
    #20
    Short answer, yes.

    The more reserach you do the more you will see that "it makes no difference unless you do graphics intensive work rah rah"

    That's balogna. It makes a difference when just opening and closing apps.

    ----------

    Dude that's really good! I would've gotten 16GB but that's only b/c I got 8 and now I use my computer for MORE intensive tasks then I thought.
     
  21. johngwheeler macrumors 6502

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    #21
    Larger SSDs tend to be faster

    This is not completely true in all cases. The 1TB SSDs have significantly faster sustained through put speed (c. 950MB/s versus 700 MB/s for the smaller sizes).

    There may be a small difference in sustained read/write speed between 512GB and 256GB.

    However, Apple uses both Samsung and SanDisk SSDs in the 256GB model, and the SanDisk write speed is about 100-150 MB/s slower than the SamSung.

    The latency and IOPS are probably similar though, so you won't notice the difference unless you regularly transfer large files to another SSD.

    HTH,

    John
     
  22. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    Boston
    #22
    I doubt very much you'll notice the speed difference in real world computing. Benchmarks will of course show a small increase, but day to day stuff - not so much.
     
  23. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #23
    Exactly. The 1TB model has four PCIe lanes vs. two lanes on the smaller models. There were quite a few threads on this when the new models came out.

    Also, you can pick about any SSD and the larger model will perform better because of the way data is striped across multiple RAM modules on larger drives.

    You usually see the biggest jump from 128GB to 256GB and less so from 256GB to 512GB, but it is there.

    Probably not noticeable just launching Safari, but with large file transfers it would be noticeable.
     
  24. sjinsjca macrumors 68000

    sjinsjca

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    Oct 30, 2008
    #24
    Actually, yes it does, at least in theory: The 1TB SSDs have a double-wide PCI connection (http://9to5mac.com/2013/11/04/lates...ing-ssd-performance-thanks-to-4-channel-pcie/). But you'd probably notice the difference only in very demanding usage like rendering multiple videos simultaneously, running several virtual machines at the same time, etc. For OP's described usage, I agree that there'd be little or no perceptual difference.

    Also, the answer can depend on how stuffed the SSD is. If you have 240GB of stuff on your disk, you will notice the difference between a 512GB and a 256GB SSD.

    Meanwhile, OP, the advice you're receiving to maximize RAM is excellent. Max it out.
     
  25. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #25
    Read my later post on this subject.
     

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