Is iPad Pro ready for design work?

Discussion in 'Design and Graphics' started by sigmadog, Sep 9, 2015.

  1. sigmadog macrumors 6502a

    sigmadog

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    #1
    So after today's Apple Event (9/9/15), I'm wondering if the iPad Pro is now suitable for actual design work.

    My opinion at this point is informed by my advanced age and reputation as a bit of a curmudgeon when it comes to new toys: If what I'm doing (and how I'm doing it) now works fine the only reason to change would be if the new product/software actually makes things easier and faster. At this point, I don't see the faster or easier aspects of using an iPad in place of a Mac.

    In fact, I tried using an iPad for a couple years, but the lack of a good means of transferring files/artwork from IOS to OSX and conversion issues made it a real headache.

    I hear Adobe is working on mobile apps, but since I'm old school and prefer to own my software, I don't see myself moving from CS6 to the Creative Cloud (plus I'm scared of heights).

    Is there anyone out there in Designland using an iPad for real design / illustration work? If so, what's it like, and are you excited/disappointed with today's iPad Pro announcement?
     
  2. TSE macrumors 68030

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    #2
    The only way I see it is if it has the pressure sensitivity of a Cintiq. Then yes, it will be useful in terms of designing.
     
  3. 960design macrumors 68000

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    #3
    I'll let you know as soon as it arrives.
     
  4. chaosbunny macrumors 68000

    chaosbunny

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    #4
    I don't think it's meant to be used in place of a Mac. You can't replace the full versions of the Adobe Suite or other professional design software with anything that's available on iOS. That's not what iOS is meant to be. If it can be used as a poor mans cintiq then it will maybe find its users, but given the years of experience wacom has in this field I can't see myself trading my cintiq for an iPad. Plus I can work with the full version of Photoshop on the cintiq, I can't on the iPad.

    I have never owned an iPad since I simply don't see the need for one. Why would I use the iPad on the road when everything I create on it has to be rebuilt in a proper design tool in order to be useful? Makes no sense to do it twice. I'll either use a laptop or oldschool pen & paper.
     
  5. Jim Campbell macrumors 6502a

    Jim Campbell

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    #5
    The fairly impressive Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo are both coming to iOS in a not-too-distant (but as yet unspecified) point in the future.
     
  6. ProjectManager101 Suspended

    ProjectManager101

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    #6
    The iPad pro seems like a very serious proposal to me.
     
  7. JanErik75 macrumors newbie

    JanErik75

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    #7
    I don't think an iPad Pro is meant to fully replace your desktop/laptop. I believe both Apple and Adobe see it as way to complement these systems on the go and in your couch. With new versions of the Adobe Creative Cloud suite coming to iOS and with the iPad Pro in mind, these rewritten apps will undoubtedly be much more advanced.

    I believe there also will be more solid options in transferring your files to your desktop/laptop via the Creative Cloud file storage system.
     
  8. Stevep67 macrumors newbie

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    #8
    I'm a 30-yr design vet using iPad Air for sketching (Procreate), note taking (Notes Plus) and organization (2Do). Procreate is a gorgeous painting app which lets me export my work as either PSD layered, or PNG or JPG. It works nicely with Dropbox, and I can open/edit my layered work in Photoshop (or your editing app of choice). There's also Sketchbook Pro, and other professional level apps for the iPad.

    I use an Adonit Jot Pro and a Jot Touch for stylus. Styluses to this point have the burden of capacitive touch sensors, which read a fat fingertip. The Apple Pencil looks really nice, as it has a sharper tip, and seems to drag nicely across the slick glass. Admittedly, the iPad and stylus can't match the precision of a (Wacom) tablet - yet. But it's nice to have a portable "drawing pad" that I an take anywhere.

    I cannot wait for the iPad Pro, as I need more real estate to draw naturally. Another issue with iPad has been palm rejection, as it wants to read your fingertip or other parts of your hand. It was hard for me to draw without my hand touching the screen. But many apps have palm rejection technology which eliminates that problem, and surely more will follow with iPad pro.
     
  9. sigmadog thread starter macrumors 6502a

    sigmadog

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    #9
    You'll be happy to hear that the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil reportedly have palm rejection. That's a big deal for illustrators, and one of the major reasons I gave up trying to work with my old iPad. I liked Procreate a lot, but the palm rejection issues killed it for me.

    I doubt I will be "coming home" to iPad for illustration work any time soon, as I've already committed myself to "coming home" to sketchbooks and pencils/pens when I'm away from my Cintiq. For me, the escape from technology every so often is liberating.

    I'm also a 30+ year design vet, and as cool as all these new devices are (and they ARE cool), I find that putting them down and forcing some Old School encounters with actual paper and canvas do a lot to revive my creative impuise. It's actually very enjoyable taking care with each stroke knowing there's no "Command-Z" with a traditional brush.

    With regard to design. I could see using the iPad Pro for working on thumbnails. I don't really see it as a replacement for the precision of my OSX design tools (Illustrator, InDesign, etc.). Also in this respect, I'm so comfortable working with pencil and paper, I don't think a fabulous new gadget will really make things any better.
     
  10. Macsonic macrumors 65816

    Macsonic

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    #10
    Yeah. I share your comments too. I also don't see the iPad Pro as an immediate replacement for traditional Macs. Specially first gens that are still untested. We also need to consider unforeseen bugs or incompatibilities.
     
  11. Jim Campbell macrumors 6502a

    Jim Campbell

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    #11
    Wacom's 'precision' is pretty much a myth. They get a pass for being just about the only pro-level manufacturer of this kind of kit, but pen tracking is actually terrible. Here's a series of lines that I drew on my £2,000 Cintiq 24HD with a ruler:

    [​IMG]
    I've owned three Cintiqs: a 12" which was so inaccurate that I eBayed it at a loss within days; a 21" which I liked a lot (but the ergonomics of the design didn't work for me); and a 24HD, which I use daily but have to fight against the lousy pen tracking shown above.
     
  12. chaosbunny macrumors 68000

    chaosbunny

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    #12
    Maybe something is wrong with your cintiq? Since you owned 3 I'm sure you calibrated them. I just did these on my € 900,- cintiq 13" hd - and I didn't even use a ruler but a sheet of paper I had at hand. I'm about to finish a 160 page comic book I worked on for 2 years with my cintiq and really like it very much. One thing I noticed though, it seems to be a bit more precise with Windows than Mac OS. I guess because of a more optimized driver. But not that much.

    Bildschirmfoto 2015-09-15 um 12.14.08.jpg Bildschirmfoto 2015-09-15 um 12.14.14.jpg

    Sorry can't resist: Don't drink & draw :)
     
  13. loon3y macrumors 65816

    loon3y

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    #13


    Hmmm there are 'mobile'/cut down version of adobe illustrator for iPads. (I work with clothing/jewelry designers. all fashion)

    It might not be on the App Store, but as a developer i know there is because i used them before and they're available to implement into an app that you create (open source components)


    What is considered a proper design tool? what is the limitations? What's the difference between a wacom (what I'm familiar with) and the iPad, whats different? whats limiting?


    With tablet/PC wacom type pens, it can detect the pressure, so the iPad Pro, even without force touch can still be usable.

    The only thing i really see limiting is the keyboard and mouse. The Keyboard we can solve, but the mouse (the actual mouse on the screen no the physical one you plug into your computer) might be useful, but I'D image the clicking and dragging would be a bit harder since iPad is a touch screen, and such.



    It'll be great to know what the differences is. These Apps are good if you work for a company which uses a system and they want to automate sending these designs, modifications, sketches, whatever it is; directly to the system.
     
  14. sigmadog thread starter macrumors 6502a

    sigmadog

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    #14
    I agree that for concept work, sketches, and even the occasional finish illustration, the iPad Pro might work fine enough. But it remains limited because of its operating system, which AFAIK doesn't allow for user file control and organization. Most apps appear to be stripped down in some ways to accommodate the IOS environment (whether that's due to RAM limitations or other IOS restrictions, I don't know).

    One thing that isn't mentioned much, if at all, is the use of fonts in IOS. I remember IOS 6 (or 7, I forget) on my iPad3 had no obvious means of adding or managing fonts. I seemed to be stuck with what Apple installed. As Donald Trump would say, "That's a YUUUUGE limitation!".

    I have over 500MB of fonts that I'd like to have access to when I'm working on design, regardless of which Adobe application I'm working in. I don't know if the latest IOS has instituted any font import and/or management capabilities, but that's crucial to making the device a "professional" tool, in my opinion.
     
  15. chaosbunny macrumors 68000

    chaosbunny

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    #15
    A wacom cintiq is built to be used with a computer and therefore is used with desktop and not mobile design applications.

    You can find the differences in Adobes Mac OS X and iOS applications on their website. Software wise there are too many to mention, if these are needed for specific projects is up to the specific projects.

    Font and color management are a huge factor.

    Limited sizes for documents. Can't do a 10000x6000 px sized illustration for a billboard in iOS as far as I know.

    Hardware wise proper screen calibration comes to mind.

    Then the iPads stylus needs batteries which makes it heavier and more inconvenient to use for a long time.

    Personally I have never owned an iPad and will not buy one anytime soon. I just don't see the need to start a project on one and then redo everything with the proper applications because of iOS limits. To include an iPad in my workflow would not save me any time - quite the opposite actually. Also it would not make my work any better or convenient, so why bother?
     
  16. Pakaku macrumors 68000

    Pakaku

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    #16
    For drawing, the main purpose I'd get out of an iPad pro, ProCreate is virtually the equivalent to Photoshop if not miles better. But I've never used a Cintiq.

    "Rebuilding" isn't so bad if it means better modernized software in the end. Final Cut Pro X is a good example.
     
  17. chaosbunny macrumors 68000

    chaosbunny

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    #17
    Software is not what I meant. I meant some sort of illustration or design. I meant that when I do a layout or sketch within limited iOS software, I would have to do it again in bigger size or more accurate or with different fonts or proper prepared for print etc... so why not simply do it with the complete tool right away and save time? I'd rather use a wacom cintiq companion with Windows than an iPad with iOS. Different people, different needs & tastes.
     
  18. sigmadog thread starter macrumors 6502a

    sigmadog

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    #18
    I was actually looking at those after the Apple Event last week because I suspected the iPad Pro wasn't really going to help much in terms of mobility AND design work. Not sure they're quite ready for prime time yet, however.
     
  19. wheelhot macrumors 68020

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    #19
    Actually with AstroPad IOS app, the iPadPro could just replace a Wacom :D
     
  20. saschke macrumors 6502

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    #20
    I've just bought it and tried it out with my iPad mini and Adonit Jot Pro and it works absolutely great. I can't imagine how nice this will be with the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil, which I'm definitely getting now.
     
  21. loon3y macrumors 65816

    loon3y

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    #21

    Thats more of an APP limitation rather then iOS. We have an app you can import via dropbox.

    Thanks for your insight, if theres any other limitations on iOS that you know of that frustrates you please let me know.




    I wasn't talking about Adobe iOS applications, thats not an iOS limitations, your given what the developers gave you.


    I'm not sure what you mean by font and color management. Those are possible through iOS development. Our company has an app that can import fonts and manage colors either by color pallet or RGB code.

    Thanks for your reply!
     
  22. chaosbunny macrumors 68000

    chaosbunny

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    #22
    I mean color profiles and that they are displayed as correct as possible. sRGB, Adobe RGB, eci RGB v2, euroscale coated v2, ISO coated v2, ... there are many different rgb and cmyk profiles for different use cases. And you can't connect an iPad to an Eizo, Nec or Quato screen if need be.

    As for some of my other points I think it is also a hardware limitation. You can only go so far with 4gb ram.
     
  23. sigmadog thread starter macrumors 6502a

    sigmadog

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    #23
    Advertising and design for print is a bit different, I think you'd admit. Because of the nature of creating a visual message that may combine images, text, illustrations and graphics, stripped-down versions of software aren't adequate for full professional use.

    I'm not sure I understand what you mean. Are you saying designers should create our own apps? Not sure that's a practical solution for artists and designers.

    A Wacom is tied to the computer's operating system, and can therefore make use of the full range of options within that system. I can use my Wacom Cintiq and enjoy the full benefits of a mature and flexible operating system that runs full-featured applications without compromising functionality.

    The iPad utilizes a different, restrictive operating system (by "restrictive" I mean it is closed off to many benefits that we professional artists and designers need in OSX, like an accessible file system, font management and color management).

    It is clear to me that IOS was conceived primarily as an operating system intended for content consumption, not content creation. This is not to say that content cannot be created in IOS, but the type of project typically undertaken by professional print designers and artists is simply not possible on an iPad. I'm not about to start using Pages to design ads, brochures and catalogs!

    I think the many styli that are available for iPad do indeed help for the limited type of work for which the iPad is capable.

    Not exactly sure what you are talking about here, but what I've written above shows my reservations concerning the iPad as a "professional" tool.
     
  24. sigmadog thread starter macrumors 6502a

    sigmadog

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    #24
    Having just conducted a quick search, I've discovered there are in fact font management apps for the iPad. I don't know how good they are, but they apparently exist.

    Another issue that I wonder about is image resolution. When designing for publications I maintain a 300 ppi resolution for all images. How would this be achieved on an iPad? Does Adobe's iPad apps handle this?

    The iPad will be a good tool for print design when I can create my layout on the iPad and transfer it seamlessly to my desktop and vice versa. Until then, it appears it will be more work than it's worth.
     
  25. loon3y macrumors 65816

    loon3y

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    #25



    Of course not the designers shouldn't be developing their own apps.But most professional/business apps are going to be custom built and there still is a learning/adjustment curb on what truly is the best use for mobile devices. But font management and color management thats not too complex is all capable in iOS.




    Obviously there are certain roles already, inventory, scan and pack, scan and receive, taking orders (wholesale to POS), which also includes holding a huge local database, illustration, Product data management, etc etc.


    So most of these apps made for businesses, are going to be custom business to business apps, which most companies are getting into.

    So no they wouldn't be creating their own apps, but their companies would hire Us or hire someone from their ERP/Main System company to either create or provide an existing custom app that would meet their needs.I mean we're talking about professionally. Yes i know there are artists out there that work alone or independently or whatever.

    But thats not where business apps are going to be developed or used at first. Because first of all, they can't afford nor have the time to develop or help develop an app. Where as any mid-large sized company can, and they do invest if its going to save time, labor, and maybe 1-3 full time salaries.


    The wacom pen not using full features is a programming issue, they just haven't gotten to it yet. The file accessibility isn't an iOS issue. Its a programming issue, I know its there. Why? because there are Microsoft Office apps, you don't have to use pages. The fact that Microsoft office apps like word and excel are there means that its definitely capable of accessing those files.

    I haven't tested with word docs or excel formatted files particularly, but you can import fonts, and illustrator and photoshop files, (jpeg, png, svg, etc etc)


    Im not completely sure if its allowed, but its definitely capable because microsoft office apps are the proof of it. Again, these things take time, complex business apps that need to go to layers of communications with a back end is much more harder to develop then something like twitter.

    iOS development isn't easy, especially when its for business but apple is definitely pushing B2B apps hard.


    and regarding iOS limitations i haven't seen much that "I" have ran into and our main system is windows based.




    Don't get me wrong, an artist isn't going to do their main/finished project on an iPad. Its just a simpler, faster way to get data entered in with mobility and convenience. And it might not imply to your career, but i just want to point out a couple things
     

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