Is it impossible to go back to school for computer science?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Ghost31, Jan 5, 2016.

  1. Ghost31 macrumors 68000

    Ghost31

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    #1
    I'm an older guy and it looks like it's damn near impossible to go back to school for computer science while working to support my family
     
  2. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

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    Oct 25, 2008
    #2
    Have you investigated on line schools? Some are cheaper than others and perhaps you could apply for grants.
     
  3. Ghost31 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Ghost31

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    #3
    A little bit. I'm so worried whatever online school I pick will be a scam or something though like some ITT tech or univ Phoenix type crap. Some of them like oregon''s CS program require a Bach just to get into the damn program. And is an online degree as respected and valuable as a regular one?

    Navigating all this is confusing
     
  4. hiddenmarkov macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Japan
    #4
    You could try some MOOC's (think massively online, just with education not games) and see if you can fit these into the daily routine before trying a more expensive credit granting option leading to degree. Most offer free or very reasonably price "verified" options that give a different more "professional" proof of completion. Free you can say you did the class and hopefully you learned from it.

    I mix and match, some free ones more to clear out the cobwebs in my head. Paid ones I do to keep up CPE (continuing professional education) most times for an IT cert I have that needs them to not have to retest every 3 years. Test was "fun" enough the first time I took it lol.

    With Coursera.org and edx.org I have done a few. Have wide ranges of topics to look over.
     
  5. D.T. macrumors 603

    D.T.

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    Vilano Beach, FL
    #5
    Are you trying to get into software development? Have you ever done any? Have any expertise with anything in the tech sector, engineering, math (i.e., is this a 180º from your current occupation)?
     
  6. Ghost31 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Ghost31

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    Jun 9, 2015
    #6
    No expertise in anything yet. Currently I work as a CNA and am looking for a career change and I enjoy programming a lot. I play with Python all the time and would like to keep learning more and turn it into something I can get paid doing. As I see from job postings and such, a Bach in comp sci is pretty much required for everything these days but I'm having a hard time figuring out how I'll be able to get one. I have to work to support my daughter at the same time
     
  7. D.T. macrumors 603

    D.T.

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    #7
    OK, yeah, you've got some solid tech/IT background, and sounds like you're a "serious hobbiest" with coding. I think there's probably quite a few opportunities that don't require a formal degree, but you'd have to be pretty thoroughly self-taught to pursue those, and it's hard to get that kind of deep experience without really immersing yourself into it - which is kind of tricky with a family/kids/work ... one reason I quit on a recent startup, just didn't want to bail on life for several months, plus I'm a little old for that kind of thing (again) :)
     
  8. Ghost31 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Ghost31

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    #8
    DT: What's your line of work? If you don't mind me asking. Do you have a CS degree?

    I don't know what I can really do when part of my life is filled up with other things like my current job and having a kid to take care of. Someone suggested trying to get a CS degree online but I don't know how legit that sounds
     
  9. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #9
    Take a look at Western Governors University. It gets some very good ratings. You may want to look at the BS degrees within IT that includes one more oriented towards programming. Let me know what you think.
     
  10. AlliFlowers Contributor

    AlliFlowers

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    Jan 1, 2011
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    L.A. (Lower Alabama)
    #10
    Phoenix has a great reputation, and their degrees are accepted everywhere as they are an accredited university.

    Maybe you should go ahead and take a single course and see how it works for you. When I went back for my masters, I was teaching full time and had a family. I started with one class.

    But if you keep coming up with excuses, you'll never do it.
     
  11. Ghost31 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Ghost31

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    #11
    I'm looking right now. Not sure what I think. The fact that they compare themselves to university of Phoenix like its a legit school worries me
    --- Post Merged, Jan 5, 2016 ---
    Wait Phoenix? Like university of Phoenix? Are you joking?
     

    Attached Files:

  12. AlliFlowers Contributor

    AlliFlowers

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    #12
    Phoenix University. Online. Great programs. They have the same accreditation as any other university.
     
  13. Ghost31 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Ghost31

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    #13
    I found a lot of crap and scam schools upon doing a Google search. Care to link? Wonder if they distinguish the degree as being any different than an in person degree
     
  14. AlliFlowers Contributor

    AlliFlowers

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    Jan 1, 2011
    Location:
    L.A. (Lower Alabama)
    #14
    I work with several people who got their doctorates from Phoenix, as well as a few people who got their masters. As I said, they hold the same accreditation as a school where you get "an in person degree."

    http://www.phoenix.edu/
     
  15. Ghost31 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Ghost31

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    Jun 9, 2015
    #15
    Why do I always hear that a degree from that place is worthless? Why is their reputation so bad?
     
  16. D.T. macrumors 603

    D.T.

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    #16
    I'm a developer/architect/writer, in the industry for 25+ years, 3rd company (plus a couple of startups), working out of my home office.
     
  17. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    Location:
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    #17
    You may not get any 'credit' for them, but MOOCs would be a decent way to take some coursework in relevant areas. Don't underestimate the value of having someone curate and present a subject that you'd like to learn a lot more about.
     
  18. Ghost31 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Ghost31

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    #18
    That's really impressive. As someone just starting out, how do I get to be where you are? What can I do?
     
  19. AlliFlowers Contributor

    AlliFlowers

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    Location:
    L.A. (Lower Alabama)
    #19
    From whom do you hear that?
     
  20. ProjectManager101 Suspended

    ProjectManager101

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2015
    #20
    Look, do a training in project management, it will work for every area of your life. Be the boss, not the employee. Learn how to handle a project, then learn management, then learn marketing. You can get those trainings and THEN you will know where to target your coding.

    I manage people who are doing coding, video editors, graphic designers, investors, clients, social media. All of them are good when they do their work in the right direction: profits. My job is to create the project, telling them what to do, do quality control and delivery. Trust me, every single person is literally useless without my direction.

    Every employee has no clue what to do with their life if I do not explain them. At Apple, when they have an idea, lets say the Apple Watch, the first person they talk to are the project managers, they know how to make everything happen, cost and time. And is not a hard thing to do. It will give more sense to your projects.
     
  21. nightcap965 macrumors 6502a

    nightcap965

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    Feb 11, 2004
    Location:
    Cape Cod
    #21
    I second ProjectManager101's advice.

    Most IT departments don't have very many programmers, if any. Businesses buy off-the-shelf solutions, software-as-a-service, you name it, if there's a way to outsource it or cheapsource it, they'll do it.

    Project management is the skill set they can't outsource.
     
  22. smallcoffee macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2014
    Location:
    North America
    #22
    University of Phoenix, like the online for-profit school?

    How about this: Would Carnegie Mellon or Stanford consider a University of Phoenix computer science major for a masters/PHD program?

    It's a rhetorical question.
     
  23. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    #23
    Build something that works that you can showcase and apply for a starting programming job. Once you have a few years in apply to a masters program.
     
  24. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #24
    Every single personal is literally useless without direction...that's some workplace.
     
  25. determined09 macrumors 65816

    determined09

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    Location:
    North America
    #25
    Well, I found this article online.
    Pentagon puts for-profit University of Phoenix on probation
    http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/pentagon-puts-profit-university-phoenix-probation/

    Here's another article
    University of Phoenix Accreditation Hits Snag As Panel Recommends Probation
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/25/university-of-phoenix-accreditation_n_2762168.html

    In addition, I did about two ladies that applied for news jobs for the hospital in Texas that they work at and this hospital will not accept their degrees from University of Phoenix. It just depends on the company if they will accept a degree from U Of Phoenix.
     

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