Is it parked?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by 030108, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. 030108 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    #1
    When my, late 2007, shipped with Leopard, Macbook is OFF and UNplugged, with the battery in, is the hard drive in a parked state?

    I am not completely sure SO I am asking.

    Thanks
     
  2. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #2
    Well it's not spinning.. but is it parked, as in some sort of internal breaking system? The HD manufacturer should be able to answer that.
     
  3. ntrigue macrumors 68040

    ntrigue

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    #3
    Granted the HDD parks the head as a means to save power with the computer ON. It seems logical that with everything OFF the head is parked.
     
  4. sgarringer macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Location:
    Cedar Rapids, IA
    #4
    Yes all modern hard drives park themselves when power is removed automatically. Only very old MFM hard drives (circa the mid 80s) had to be parked by hand. That "thunk" you hear when a hard drive powers off is the head moving over to the edge of the platter... and parking itself. This is also why hard drives are rated for both "operating" and "non-operating" shock values.
     
  5. ElectricSheep macrumors 6502

    ElectricSheep

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Location:
    Wilmington, DE
    #5
    Read/Write heads ride off the surface of a disk by margin of about 3 to 4 nanometers. It relies on a cushion of moving air (driven party by the motion of the spinning platter) to keep it from plowing into the magnetic surface of the disk with deleterious results.

    If the computer is off, than the Hard disk's platters are not spinning, and the head is parked.

    If the head were not parked, and the platters were not spinning, you'd have a real problem the next time the drive went into spin-up.
     
  6. 030108 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    #6
    Thankyou All For Responding.

    Just curious. Are the shock values for my particular Macbook published on Apple.com or somewhere?


     

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