Is it possible to change the CPU in a Macbook?

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by zoebaggins, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. zoebaggins macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2011
    #1
    I have the last model Macbook before it was discontinued, and was wondering if it's possible to change the CPU? I already upgraded the RAM to maximum capacity and am working on the hard drive next.

    I understand that the CPU module is soldered onto the motherboard but I've been reading that it can be done; however, you have to exchange quite a few things out but they still need to be compatible with Mac. Can anybody verify this or is it just simply not possible?

    I already know it voids the warranty and I don't really care about the warranty since I bought this used anyways.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    There's a lot more to it than just changing the CPU. All the components are designed to work together. Changing one can affect others. I wouldn't recommend it, unless you don't mind having a MacBook paperweight.
     
  3. zoebaggins thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 31, 2011
    #3
    So in theory it can be done, you just need to change quite a few things along with it?
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #4
    Apple can do it, because they have the knowledge and the tools to do so. I very much doubt that a user can.
     
  5. Medic278 macrumors 6502a

    Medic278

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    Feb 1, 2012
    Location:
    New York
    #5
    Yeah, in theory it sounds good but you would have to change out so many components and what not. Plus it would take a huge amount of time and I am not really sure you save enough money that such an endeavor is even worthwhile. Plus the most likely outcome, no offense to you, is like the other user said you completely kill it and have a MacBook paper weight.
     
  6. zoebaggins thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 31, 2011
    #6
    My problem is, I don't want to have to spend a few grand every x amount of years buying an entirely new one (I see the average user buying a new one every 2 years almost); that's basically throwing away money in my eyes.

    I really like the White Macbook and not many people use it anymore since they've upgraded to the Air or Pro. Eventually Core 2 Duo will be obsolete and although this Macbook is two years old, I feel like it's a lot older seeing as how Ivy Bridge is coming out soon.

    I guess I'll just have to make do.
     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #7
    I'm still running a 4 year old MBP and it works fine. It does everything I need it to do. You don't have to upgrade simply because newer models are released. I only upgrade when a computer I'm using no longer meets my needs.
     
  8. zoebaggins thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 31, 2011
    #8
    When you see everyone having the latest, greatest thing, you can't help but get sucked in the thought that you NEED it, aha. I go to university so I constantly see new things all the time; I end up feeling bummed that my stuff is outdated when you're right, it does work perfectly fine.
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #9
    "Because others have it" is a poor reason to buy anything. I buy what I need, when I need it, and ignore what others choose to do. It makes for a much more stress-free life! :)
     
  10. flatfoot macrumors 65816

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    Aug 11, 2009
    #10
    @OP:
    For the hard drive replacement, go with an SSD or, if you need more capacity and the best performance possible (other than that of an SSD), a Seagate Momentus XT 500GB/750GB, which has 4GB of SSD cache for frequently used files.

    This will speed up your MacBook noticeably without the need of soldering or exchanging any more parts.

    The bottleneck part of any computer is the mechanical HDD. For instance, my 1.4GHz C2D MacBook Air (64GB SSD) feels way snappier than my wife's white MacBook 2.2GHz C2D (100GB 7200rpm HDD).
     
  11. zoebaggins thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 31, 2011
    #11
    It is but that's the society we live in.

    I was going to ask about upgrading the hard drive... I don't have the original recovery disks, so how would I install everything back on the drive after I exchange it for a new one?
     
  12. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #12
    Yes, I live in the same society. You can choose not to be sucked in by that flawed thinking.
     
  13. Medic278 macrumors 6502a

    Medic278

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    Feb 1, 2012
    Location:
    New York
    #13
    You can buy a copy of the retail disks or the lion thumb drive to do an install. If you can't find your disks thats about all you can do.
     
  14. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #14
    1. Buy a new drive in an external drive enclosure.
    2. Clone your existing drive to the new external drive, using Carbon Copy Cloner
    3. Swap the drives.
    4. You now have a new internal drive and your old one is now an external drive, useful for backups or additional storage
     
  15. flatfoot macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    #15
    1. Make a backup of all your important data.
    2. Get an external 2.5" enclosure (USB is sufficient).
    3. Pop the replacement HDD into it.
    4. Connect it to the MacBook.
    5. Boot off an install DVD. (if you have one; should work booting from the original internal HDD as well)
    6. Open Applications-->Utilities-->Disk Utility.
    7. Format the new drive as HFS+ Journaled non-case-sensitive (standard).
    8. Select the old or the new drives in the left-hand-column.
    9. Select the "Restore" tab on the right-hand side.
    10. Drag the old drive from the left column to "Source".
    11. Drag the new drive from the left column to "Destination".
    12. Click the "Restore" button.

    Depending on how full your original drive is, this may take some time, a few hours tops.

    When it's done, shut down the MacBook and swap the old drive for the new one.

    After booting from it, everything should look just the same as before, since you just cloned the old drive to the new one.

    EDIT: GGJstudios is right. Carbon Copy Cloner is the better way to go, since people have had mixed results using Disk Utility for cloning.

    EDIT 2: What Medic278 said is not true. You can clone your drive the way GGJstudios suggested.
     
  16. zoebaggins thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 31, 2011
    #16
    Glad it's not too difficult. Thanks for all the help, guys! :)
     

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