Is it safe to cook chicken, leave it in water and then eat it?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by niuniu, Jun 3, 2010.

  1. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #1
    I always thought that if you left something like chicken in a bowl of water for a day or two the water would be full of salmonella or something else, even if it was in the fridge.

    Maybe I'm totally wrong. I just never seen it done before until today and it spooked me a little.
     
  2. davidwarren macrumors 6502a

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  3. niuniu thread starter macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #3
    Dunno, I didn't ask, was too busy arguing about salmonella. I think it was to stop the chicken drying out maybe.
     
  4. Ann P macrumors 68020

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    #4
    Perhaps it'll be okay as long as its covered. I'm thinking of canned soups and such.
     
  5. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

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    #5
    Yes but it has to be kept cold. The chicken has to be cooked first though.
     
  6. niuniu thread starter macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #6
    Yeah good point.. maybe canned soup has something done to it?
     
  7. Gregg2 macrumors 603

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    #7
  8. niuniu thread starter macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #8

    Oh yeah okay, this situation though the chicken doesn't get reheated. It just gets cooked, put in fridge in a bowl with water and then eaten for 2 days after (no reheating).

    I should have been more clear earlier..
     
  9. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #9
    As long as the water is cooked along with the chicken and brought up to the 160-170 for the required time you'll be fine.

    However, the wet chicken will go bad much quicker than dry chicken since it is a breeding ground ... thus you need more preservatives in soup than a roast chicken.

    Especially since people tend to leave the broth out to cool down before putting it in the fridge, which is a general no no for long term storage since you want food to pass through room temperature as quick as possible if you plan on keeping it the refrigerator or freezer. Or just load up on preservatives.

    ---

    People also freak out about the fish and chicken marinade, but those can also be used after marinading instead of tossed as long as you cook it ... Much better to marinade chicken, then put it in a pot and bring to boil, and use the cooked marinade on the BBQ. Prevents drunk idiots from putting raw chicken marinade on cooked chicken after it comes off grill.
     
  10. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #10
    Cooking the chicken kills the salmonella; it doesn't spontaneously reappear without a new contamination.

    That's not to say that the chicken won't spoil by other means.
     
  11. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

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    #11
    Cooked chicken put in water in the fridge is ok for a couple of days.
    I took a food safety class which has done nothing more than made me really f***ing paranoid.
     
  12. niuniu thread starter macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #12
    Yeah, like from bacteria in the water maybe..

    Home ec at school made me para too, only about chicken though :confused:




    Anyways the chicken is for animal consumption, I was over visiting the folks and my sis was over with her dog and spotted a container with chicken and water in it which kicked off the debate. Apparently the dog likes teh chicken to be moist. I still think it looks like a breeding ground for unseen death..
     
  13. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #13
    Damn it, when I saw this thread on my iPhone, I thought it said "children" rather than chicken. :(

    *leaves thread a bit disappointed*
     
  14. davidwarren macrumors 6502a

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    #14
    I don't think soaking the chicken in plain water will really keep it moist. Maybe a brine, but the key to moist chicken is not to overcook it.
     
  15. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #15
    It's actually better to leave hot items on the counter to cool for the first 1-2 hours. If you put it directly into the refrigerator, you'll raise the temperature of the refrigerator above the "safe zone", and endanger everything else in there.

    Also, if you put stuff in the fridge to soon, you'll get massive amounts of condensation built up in the container that will soak your food when you open it.
     
  16. Rapmastac1 macrumors 65816

    Rapmastac1

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    #16
    If you intend on putting something in the fridge that is hot, do not just leave it out on the counter for 2 hours, that will not help the situation at all. You are right that you don't want to put it in the fridge outright, but leaving it out on the counter is just as bad. You need to have an ice bath (do not put the chicken right in the water and ice however). You need to get it to about 30 degrees (anything under 40) and then take it out of the ice bath and store it in the fridge.

    Leaving anything in water that gets in the danger zone (41-140 F) is where bacteria growth will take place. If the water is constant running water (less than 35 degrees) then it is okay to keep it there for a little while.

    Non-human consumption is a little different though because they can handle more than we can. I wouldn't worry too much about it if the dog eats the food within a few hours. I wouldn't let the chicken sit in his water for longer than 4 hours just to be safe.
     
  17. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #17
    Immediately from the oven or stove to the placing the entire pot into a larger pot of ice, or use the handy dandy blast chiller.

    Or simply take the soup/stew off the stove, immediately place portions into smaller containers and place in refrigerator with air between them ... much like Jello in smaller containers.

    If you are worried about condensation in the food, leave the containers loosely covered/uncovered until they cool. Modern frost free refrigerators are designed to get rid of moisture and condensation.

    As Rapmastac1 pointed out, you want to go from above 140 to below 40 quick.

    ---

    A restaurant will get a failing grade for putting hot food from oven into a high traffic cooler with perishables ... but alas they should be using ice baths and blast chillers first anyhow. If it happens in a restaurant, it is likely happening daily or many times a day versus 1-2 times a year at home.
     
  18. greygray macrumors 68000

    greygray

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    #18
    This is win. :D
     
  19. bamaworks macrumors 6502

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    #19
    The good news is that dogs and other animals of the like can eat things we cannot due to a difference in the digestive track. Dogs are surprisingly well-equipped to deal with bacteria. Their saliva has antibacterial properties; it contains lysozyme, an enzyme that lyses and destroys harmful bacteria. Their short digestive tract is designed to push through food and bacteria quickly without giving bacteria time to colonize. The extremely acidic environment in the gut is also a good bacteria colonization deterrent. I wouldn't let a human eat raw chicken, or even cooked chicken sitting in water over time, but if the water is boiled sufficiently it really shouldn't matter.
     
  20. Illuminated macrumors 6502a

    Illuminated

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    #20
    As a culinary student, to cook chicken in a way that can keep it moist is to cook it in water. Pretty much make an unseasoned chicken stock, and just keep the chicken in said water. The chicken will stay moist, and you won't have to worry about any salmonella poisoning.

    Rapmastac and Mactastic got it right.

    @Rapmastac and Mactastic, did you guys take a serv safe certification course?
     
  21. niuniu thread starter macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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  22. Illuminated macrumors 6502a

    Illuminated

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    #22
    I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say they're either chefs already, or they have their Serv-Safe certificate...
    :p
     

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