Is it still not a pro machine?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by hj576, Nov 11, 2016.

  1. hj576 macrumors regular

    hj576

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Location:
    Netherlands
    #1
    Well as some people expected
    "The author Thomas Grove Carter works at Trim Editing, a studio in London where he edits “high end commercials, music videos and films” using Final Cut Pro.
    The review specifically focuses on the experience using the machine in a professional video editor’s daily workflow. Carter’s conclusion is that the new 15-inch model he was using (he doesn’t detail specs), is more than capable of handling daily editing in FCP X with 5K ProRes footage. He also notes that machine “tears strips off ‘superior spec’d’ Windows counterparts in the real world.”

    https://9to5mac.com/2016/11/10/macbook-pro-review-video-editor/
     
  2. samparmenter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2013
  3. hj576 thread starter macrumors regular

    hj576

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2016
    Location:
    Netherlands
    #3
    Only does 5K editing, Real pros work with 8K
     
  4. therealseebs macrumors 65816

    therealseebs

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2010
    #4
    Gosh, that is a very compelling argument.

    I'm a professional, and I have a ChromeBook. Clearly, the ChromeBook is a "pro" machine, because any machine used by any professional is a "pro" machine.

    Which does raise the question of why the 12" macbook isn't called a "pro", or why it's not the "MacBook Air Pro", on why the ipad mini isn't the "ipad mini pro". Or for that matter, why we don't call it the "iphone pro", or the "Nintendo Wii Pro". Since they're all absolutely as valid as "pro" machines as anything else.

    Written on my Mac SE Pro.
     
  5. Ataricade Suspended

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2016
    #5
    Bet most of the people worried about it not being a pro machine are probably not even pros themselves.
     
  6. swester macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2010
    #6
    Of course it runs Final Cut Pro X better than Windows machines, considering the latter can't run it at all. Much easier to make sweeping claims about performance! Especially when you want to keep the company who gave you a tester machine happy.
     
  7. therealseebs macrumors 65816

    therealseebs

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2010
    #7
    I keep seeing posts like this, and I don't know where it comes from. Everyone I see complaining about it is complaining because they need to do things that it's not good at.

    And at this point, I will admit that the number of things the machine can't do anymore has gotten large enough that I may be obliged to give up on trying to use the mac professionally. Too many of the things I do are becoming excessively difficult, and I'm spending about $2k extra for that.
     

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