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Do you software update as soon as it is available?

  • No, I wait around 1 week or so

  • No, I wait around 1 month

  • Yes, I always update it straight away


Results are only viewable after voting.

wirtandi

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 3, 2021
179
179
I am so confused about this. I read that you shouldnt download software updates right away, and that you should wait maybe 1 week or so before doing so. But then there are people saying it should be done as soon as possible, especially if there are security fixes.

Only concerned because I have read that many people who download it right away experience issues/bugs with their device. Some are really bad as well.

I am confused. Do you update it as soon as you can or do you wait?
 

pw5a29

macrumors 6502
Nov 28, 2016
275
299
Coventry, United Kingdom
If you are on the beta channel, I would say maybe wait for a day or two and see if any detrimental bugs?

If you are on the public channel, I would say no harm in installing right away.

The software is tested by a lot of people, even the RC build got 2 releases.
 
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n-evo

macrumors 68000
Aug 9, 2013
1,780
1,511
Amsterdam
I honestly never had any serious issues with macOS or iOS. But then again I don't rely on custom configurations, legacy apps or specific external hardware.
 

haruhiko

macrumors 604
Sep 29, 2009
6,535
5,882
1. Major versions like 13.0, 14.0
You may wait if you’re not urgent to try out the new features. But I always jumped straight into it… I love new stuff

2. Minor versions and bug fixes
For these I usually install at once since there are always important security updates included.
 
Last edited:

twintin

macrumors 6502a
Aug 10, 2012
750
282
Sweden
It is exakt same software regardless if you update immediately or one week later. So whatever issues there may be with a particular version it won't go away until (hopefully) next point update. What you really mean is whether you should update immediately or wait and se what issues may arise and then decide whether it is worth the risk (there is always a risk involved).
 

valdikor

macrumors 6502
Aug 21, 2012
388
215
Slovakia
The rule of thumb, in my book, is that for .0 updates it is generally wise to wait a few weeks or even months and then jump on the train after a few minor updates that patch all the big issues up and all the 3rd party software is updated and optimized.

Personally, I update even to .0 versions right away, but that’s me, I’m an enthusiast. If people who are unsure ask for my advice, I tell them to wait a bit.

All the minor updates that come after .0 should then be applied by everybody ASAP.

I have noticed a lot of not very tech savvy people learn some wrong lessons here. If they get burned by issues with a major (usually .0) update, they get reluctant to update their software in the future. Then, say, if they get a new device with a .0 OS, they tend to avoid updates, even though all minor updates are very likely to improve their experience (not to mention security). No everybody quite gets the distinction between major software revisions and minor updates.

That’s why I find it important to evangelize to these people that yes, they should be cautious with major updates, but it is very much in their interest to install more minor updates as soon as they are offered to them.
 

haruhiko

macrumors 604
Sep 29, 2009
6,535
5,882
The rule of thumb, in my book, is that for .0 updates it is generally wise to wait a few weeks or even months and then jump on the train after a few minor updates that patch all the big issues up and all the 3rd party software is updated and optimized.

Personally, I update even to .0 versions right away, but that’s me, I’m an enthusiast. If people who are unsure ask for my advice, I tell them to wait a bit.

All the minor updates that come after .0 should then be applied by everybody ASAP.

I have noticed a lot of not very tech savvy people learn some wrong lessons here. If they get burned by issues with a major (usually .0) update, they get reluctant to update their software in the future. Then, say, if they get a new device with a .0 OS, they tend to avoid updates, even though all minor updates are very likely to improve their experience (not to mention security). No everybody quite gets the distinction between major software revisions and minor updates.

That’s why I find it important to evangelize to these people that yes, they should be cautious with major updates, but it is very much in their interest to install more minor updates as soon as they are offered to them.
Usually they will pay the price for being victims of long fixed exploits.
 

GreyOS

macrumors 68040
Apr 12, 2012
3,355
1,682
Waiting relies on some others not waiting in order to feed back issues. It can’t be a universal option.
I update quickly.
 
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Samdh90

macrumors 6502a
Apr 26, 2021
997
812
As much as it is easy to want to update right away, it is honestly best to wait at least a week, if not longer. Let the flock get it right away and have them "uncover" bugs or flaws that was currently unknown to the producer. Think of it as a "late beta tester" haha.
 

Lemon Olive

Suspended
Nov 30, 2020
1,208
1,324
I am so confused about this. I read that you shouldnt download software updates right away, and that you should wait maybe 1 week or so before doing so. But then there are people saying it should be done as soon as possible, especially if there are security fixes.

Only concerned because I have read that many people who download it right away experience issues/bugs with their device. Some are really bad as well.

I am confused. Do you update it as soon as you can or do you wait?
Everything you read is wrong.

- There is no reason to "wait" to update for any update that is seeded for iOS. None. Zero.
- There is also no reason to rush to update even when they include security fixes. The security fixes are way over-exaggerated and overblown, like most software security issues.
 
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itickings

macrumors 6502a
Apr 14, 2007
947
185
I always check MR first, to make sure there are no computer stopping install bugs, before installing a OS update.
That used to be my strategy too! Still is for macOS.

But iOS and iPadOS have been pretty good to me for quite some time, so I’m not as sceptical. Still wouldn’t do automagical updates, but I absolutely do updates to public stable versions without consulting MR.
 
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Apple_Robert

Contributor
Sep 21, 2012
34,570
50,229
In the middle of several books.
That used to be my strategy too! Still is for macOS.

But iOS and iPadOS have been pretty good to me for quite some time, so I’m not as sceptical. Still wouldn’t do automagical updates, but I absolutely do updates to public stable versions without consulting MR.
A few years ago, Apple had several iOS OS updates in a row that really messed up your device. Luckily, that didn't happen to me because I checked MR first.

You are right, though. iOS has been very stable with updates and I haven't had any problems. I have gotten in the habit of checking MR for iOS updates. Maybe it is reading the 'I don't see the update, downloading now, rhetoric early on that is the key. lol
 

LFC2020

macrumors P6
Apr 4, 2020
16,874
38,036
Always update straight away if you have the time, most of the time they include security fixes and fixes for exploits.

Have a look at how many security fixes they fixed with Big Sur 11.4.
 

Altis

macrumors 68040
Sep 10, 2013
3,167
4,897
I'm in no rush to update at all.

If I have an install of iOS that's working really well, I don't have much reason to update at all. I generally prefer to be on the latest minor revision of a previous major revision.

Much to my frustration, Apple doesn't let you choose your version, nor do they let you revert if a permanent iOS update causes you issues or annoyances. If they allowed it, I'd be more quick to update. I want to be on a version that actually works well and has the fewest issues that affect me -- they all seem to have various issues, and once I get enough, I'm stuck in a cycle of updating constantly hoping for those issues to be addressed, but getting new issues instead.
 
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thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
7,005
3,343
I tend to update right away if it patches any critical security bugs. If you use this for work and it's a major release of any kind, check that software you depend on is complaint prior to update. Otherwise you end up having to restore from a backup, which is an unnecessary headache for something like this.


Much to my frustration, Apple doesn't let you choose your version, nor do they let you revert if a permanent iOS update causes you issues or annoyances. If they allowed it, I'd be more quick to update. I want to be on a version that actually works well and has the fewest issues that affect me -- they all seem to have various issues, and once I get enough, I'm stuck in a cycle of updating constantly hoping for those issues to be addressed, but getting new issues instead.

Performing a rollback on something as complicated as an operating system is an imperfect process. I wouldn't provide an option for it either. If you need to roll it back, you do so by restoring from a backup.
 
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itickings

macrumors 6502a
Apr 14, 2007
947
185
If I have an install of iOS that's working really well, I don't have much reason to update at all. I generally prefer to be on the latest minor revision of a previous major revision.
From a stability point of view, that’s a great strategy.

Less doable if one desires new features introduced in the next major revision. ?
 

lumpycustard

macrumors newbie
Apr 21, 2021
22
44
Depends on the use case. Home PC, I immediately update mostly because i hate the update notification staring at me.

For a business machine that i depend on day in day out, i wait at least a week.
 

Altis

macrumors 68040
Sep 10, 2013
3,167
4,897
From a stability point of view, that’s a great strategy.

Less doable if one desires new features introduced in the next major revision. ?
For sure, but I couldn't tell you the last time Apple added new "features" I actually cared about. I can say they often make what I do use worse for me, and almost always the whole system becomes even less responsive.

Gone are the days when I couldn't wait for that next update to see what it would bring.
 

Altis

macrumors 68040
Sep 10, 2013
3,167
4,897
Performing a rollback on something as complicated as an operating system is an imperfect process. I wouldn't provide an option for it either. If you need to roll it back, you do so by restoring from a backup.
No need for a direct rollback process (like in Windows) -- it's as easy as letting us fresh install the old version and restoring content from backup. They simply do not want to allow it, for reasons that do not seem in favor of the consumer.
 

itickings

macrumors 6502a
Apr 14, 2007
947
185
For sure, but I couldn't tell you the last time Apple added new "features" I actually cared about. I can say they often make what I do use worse for me, and almost always the whole system becomes even less responsive.

Gone are the days when I couldn't wait for that next update to see what it would bring.
…and that’s the important thing, finding a strategy that works for you!

No need for a direct rollback process (like in Windows) -- it's as easy as letting us fresh install the old version and restoring content from backup. They simply do not want to allow it, for reasons that do not seem in favor of the consumer.
Still not completely straightforward. I can’t imagine there are enough consumers interested in doing that to warrant the added complexity.
 

max2

macrumors 603
May 31, 2015
6,407
2,034
If you are on the beta channel, I would say maybe wait for a day or two and see if any detrimental bugs?

If you are on the public channel, I would say no harm in installing right away.

The software is tested by a lot of people, even the RC build got 2 releases.

Exactly.
 

Apple_Robert

Contributor
Sep 21, 2012
34,570
50,229
In the middle of several books.
No need for a direct rollback process (like in Windows) -- it's as easy as letting us fresh install the old version and restoring content from backup. They simply do not want to allow it, for reasons that do not seem in favor of the consumer.
I think Apple has the mindset of saving the consumer from their own actions. If Apple allowed rollback at will, it could place a lot of people in danger from a security point of view, not to mention a usability point of view. Apple would need to keep updating all of the older OS and that just isn't really practical long term, in my opinion.
 
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thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
7,005
3,343
No need for a direct rollback process (like in Windows) -- it's as easy as letting us fresh install the old version and restoring content from backup. They simply do not want to allow it, for reasons that do not seem in favor of the consumer.

My guess is that they don't want to deal with support issues surrounding this, but it's speculative on my part.
 
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