Is Mac mini (2012) capable of driving my display?

nateo200

macrumors 68030
Feb 4, 2009
2,857
6
Northern District NY
I am planning to connect Mac mini to HP ZR30w display (http://www.anandtech.com/show/3754/a-new-30-contender-hp-zr30w-review). :)
Is mini capable of driving 30” 2560x1600 resolution display at 60Hz? :confused:
Should be able too drive at that resolution...70% sure about the refresh rate though. The old 16:10 Apple Cinema displays were the 2560x1600 instead of the now 2560x1440 so I don't see it being an issue. I know most all Apple computers can drive up to 2560x1600.
 

ytk

macrumors regular
Jul 8, 2010
226
8
Yes, but you'll need a Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI adapter. It'll cost you $99 from Apple, but I've been using one from Monoprice.com that only cost $69. It works okay. A bit flaky at times (although it's connected to a laptop, so it gets unplugged and jostled quite a bit more than on a Mini), but I've heard that the official Apple one isn't much better.
 

TetheredHeart

macrumors newbie
Oct 24, 2012
24
0
Yes, your Mac will drive it no problem.

Yes, but you'll need a Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI adapter. It'll cost you $99 from Apple, but I've been using one from Monoprice.com that only cost $69. It works okay. A bit flaky at times (although it's connected to a laptop, so it gets unplugged and jostled quite a bit more than on a Mini), but I've heard that the official Apple one isn't much better.
The ZR30W has DisplayPort.
 

BigMa

macrumors member
Original poster
May 31, 2012
43
0
Thank you very kindly!

What connection, in your opinion, will give me the best results:

1. Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter

OR :confused:

2. Mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort Adapter Cable

I sure do hope option 2 works as good as option 1: 10 times price difference!

I understand this is probably a silly question, but I am just an artist, not a hardware Guru. Please help! :)

Not sure if it makes any difference, but I am going to order Mac mini in the following configuration: :D

2.6GHz Quad-Core Intel Core i7
4GB 1600MHz DDR3 SDRAM - 2x2GB
1TB Serial ATA Drive @ 5400 rpm

Later, when my "banker" approves, I will be upgrading RAM to 16GB and installing 256GB SSD (need your recommendations here as well, please). :)
 
Last edited:

calvol

macrumors 6502a
Feb 3, 2011
991
2
I would go mDP-DP, no use in doing a conversion to DVI if DP is available. Much cleaner.
 

BigMa

macrumors member
Original poster
May 31, 2012
43
0
Thank you!

The simpler the better: I will go with mDP-to-DP Adaptor Cable than and save a few bucks over the other option! :)

Any suggestions regarding memory upgrade? :confused:
 

ytk

macrumors regular
Jul 8, 2010
226
8
Yes, your Mac will drive it no problem.



The ZR30W has DisplayPort.
Why, indeed it does! I was thinking of the LP3065, which is the older model that I have. Ignore what I said about the DVI adapter. Totally go Mini-DP to DP.

Do the RAM before the SSD. Not only is it much cheaper, but you'll see more of a difference. Nothing can bog down a system like running out of RAM.

Honestly, SSDs are overrated in my opinion. I put one in both my MacBook Pro and my Mac Pro, and the performance gain was decent, but not mind-blowing. Not to mention the fact that I've had reliability issues with my laptop's drive. Where you see the most gain with an SSD is if you're launching a lot of applications frequently, or when booting (which I do maybe 2 or 3 times a month across all of my computers, all told). All in all, I can't say I'd really recommend it.
 

BigMa

macrumors member
Original poster
May 31, 2012
43
0
Thank you very kindly!

I will go with Mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort Adapter Cable:
http://www.amazon.com/StarTech-6-Feet-DisplayPort-Adapter-Cable/dp/B002XVYZ82 :D

Now about RAM. Here is what I found so far (2012 Mac mini compatible): :rolleyes:

Kingston :confused:
System Specific Memory: Apple Mac mini (DDR3) Core i5/i7 (Late 2012)
8GB Module - DDR3 1600MHz
Part Number: KTA-MB1600/8G
HTS: 8473.30.1140, ECCN: EAR99
http://www.kingston.com/us/memory/search?DeviceType=2&Mfr=APP&Line=Mac mini (DDR3)&Model=80279

Crucial :confused:
DDR3 Upgrade for the Apple Mac mini (Late 2012) Desktop/PC
16GB kit (8GBx2), 204-pin SODIMM, DDR3 PC3-12800 memory module
Part Number: CT3650286
Module Size: 16GB kit (8GBx2)
Package: 204-pin SODIMM
Feature: DDR3 PC3-12800
Specs: DDR3 PC3-12800 • CL=11 • Unbuffered • NON-ECC • DDR3-1600 • 1.35V • 1024Meg x 64 •
http://www.crucial.com/store/mpartspecs.aspx?mtbpoid=357C4175A5CA7304

Which is the fastest, i.e. providing minimal latency: could not find any info for Kingston? :confused: Any other suggestions, please? :)
 

smithrh

macrumors 68020
Feb 28, 2009
2,480
922
Honestly, SSDs are overrated in my opinion. I put one in both my MacBook Pro and my Mac Pro, and the performance gain was decent, but not mind-blowing. Not to mention the fact that I've had reliability issues with my laptop's drive. Where you see the most gain with an SSD is if you're launching a lot of applications frequently, or when booting (which I do maybe 2 or 3 times a month across all of my computers, all told). All in all, I can't say I'd really recommend it.
Based on this quote, I'd really have to lean towards something not right with your SSD or installation.

Gains by going with SSD *are* dramatic.

Highly recommended. In fact, I'd recommend it over almost all other upgrades, with the one caveat of getting to 8Gb RAM.
 

Whackman

macrumors regular
Oct 23, 2012
180
72
I will go with Mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort Adapter Cable:
http://www.amazon.com/StarTech-6-Feet-DisplayPort-Adapter-Cable/dp/B002XVYZ82 :D

Now about RAM. Here is what I found so far (2012 Mac mini compatible): :rolleyes:

Kingston :confused:
System Specific Memory: Apple Mac mini (DDR3) Core i5/i7 (Late 2012)
8GB Module - DDR3 1600MHz
Part Number: KTA-MB1600/8G
HTS: 8473.30.1140, ECCN: EAR99
http://www.kingston.com/us/memory/search?DeviceType=2&Mfr=APP&Line=Mac mini (DDR3)&Model=80279

Crucial :confused:
DDR3 Upgrade for the Apple Mac mini (Late 2012) Desktop/PC
16GB kit (8GBx2), 204-pin SODIMM, DDR3 PC3-12800 memory module
Part Number: CT3650286
Module Size: 16GB kit (8GBx2)
Package: 204-pin SODIMM
Feature: DDR3 PC3-12800
Specs: DDR3 PC3-12800 • CL=11 • Unbuffered • NON-ECC • DDR3-1600 • 1.35V • 1024Meg x 64 •
http://www.crucial.com/store/mpartspecs.aspx?mtbpoid=357C4175A5CA7304

Which is the fastest, i.e. providing minimal latency: could not find any info for Kingston? :confused: Any other suggestions, please? :)
Yeah i'd love to know if the kingston ram is good for the mac mini too.
Any differences with the ram that is used in the mac mini???
 

Poki

macrumors 65816
Mar 21, 2012
1,317
903
A Mini can drive up to two 1600p and one 1200p displays, so why should a single 1600p display be a problem at all?
 

BigMa

macrumors member
Original poster
May 31, 2012
43
0
Thank you guys!

What I still do not get is the refresh rate HD4000 will be able to drive my HP ZR30w at 2560x1600 resolution... Will it be enough to properly display Blu-Ray movies? :confused:
I realize I am probably asking silly questions, but I am just an artist, not a hardware Guru... :)
 

ytk

macrumors regular
Jul 8, 2010
226
8
Based on this quote, I'd really have to lean towards something not right with your SSD or installation.

Gains by going with SSD *are* dramatic.

Highly recommended. In fact, I'd recommend it over almost all other upgrades, with the one caveat of getting to 8Gb RAM.
Oh, there was unquestionably a performance gain. The system booted much faster, and apps launched a lot faster. But so what? I boot my system maybe once or twice a month, if that. Waiting an extra 30 seconds doesn't really bother me. As for launching apps, I have 8GB of RAM on my laptop and 32GB on my desktop. I don't usually launch apps more than once after booting, because I rarely need to quit them to free up RAM. I keep a pretty close eye on my RAM usage as well (thank you, iStat Menus!) and I seldom come close to maxing it out. Unless you're using a lot of very specialized applications that chew through RAM like candy (and I have a few of those on my desktop, hence the 32GB), you're going to have a tough time maxing out 16GB on a Mini.

Once your system is up and running, and all of your applications are loaded into RAM, there's not much benefit an SSD is capable of providing.
 

Poki

macrumors 65816
Mar 21, 2012
1,317
903
Once your system is up and running, and all of your applications are loaded into RAM, there's not much benefit an SSD is capable of providing.
Well, I never shut down my Macs, but not to close any programs after using them seems a bit much. After all, I'm pretty sure Final Cut runs considerably slower with Aperture and Motion open in the background then without them. So I have to open and close those apps a few times every day - and when I can save only five seconds on each start, a SSD ends up being worth it.
 

ytk

macrumors regular
Jul 8, 2010
226
8
Well, I never shut down my Macs, but not to close any programs after using them seems a bit much. After all, I'm pretty sure Final Cut runs considerably slower with Aperture and Motion open in the background then without them. So I have to open and close those apps a few times every day - and when I can save only five seconds on each start, a SSD ends up being worth it.
If you have the RAM to keep them all running, you shouldn't see any performance hit at all, and switching between them is much faster. If you don't have the RAM, then sure, an SSD will help, but then why not spend a lot less money and hassle on more RAM, for a much greater performance increase?
 

Poki

macrumors 65816
Mar 21, 2012
1,317
903
If you have the RAM to keep them all running, you shouldn't see any performance hit at all, and switching between them is much faster. If you don't have the RAM, then sure, an SSD will help, but then why not spend a lot less money and hassle on more RAM, for a much greater performance increase?
I've got 16 GB RAM, that's not the problem. The problem is, most of these programs use CPU power when running in the background.
 

jack92029

macrumors member
Oct 23, 2012
30
0
Apple Web site says....

This footnote is used to support Apple's claims of the increased speed of the Intel HD 4000.

Apparently Apple tested the Mini with only HD4000 driving a 2560x1440 display. I would presume that Apple would use their own Thunderbolt display for testing purposes. ;)


APPLE SAYS: "Testing conducted by Apple in October 2012 using preproduction 2.5GHz dual-core Intel Core i5-based Mac mini units with Intel HD Graphics 4000 and 512MB graphics memory, and shipping 2.3GHz dual-core Intel Core i5-based Mac mini units with Intel HD Graphics 3000 and 384MB graphics memory, all configured with 4GB RAM. Portal v(5042)(620) tested using LaserStairs.dem, medium graphics quality, no anti-aliasing, trilinear anisotropic filtering, at 2560x1440. Half-Life 2: Episode Two v(4295)(420) tested using storm.dem, medium graphics quality, no anti-aliasing, trilinear anisotropic filtering, at 2560x1440. Performance tests are conducted using specific computer systems and reflect the approximate performance of Mac mini."
 

ytk

macrumors regular
Jul 8, 2010
226
8
I've got 16 GB RAM, that's not the problem. The problem is, most of these programs use CPU power when running in the background.
Actually, most of them don't. I keep a close eye on my processor usage as well—I have 24 little thermometers in my menu bar that tell me when each of the processors is in use, and they virtually never go above normal idle usage unless I'm actively doing something, regardless of what I have running in the background.
 

BigMa

macrumors member
Original poster
May 31, 2012
43
0
Thank you!

Thank you jack92029! It looks like HD4000 is quite capable: at least I will be able to watch Blu-Ray movies in all 1080p glory... :)

Do we know what the exact specks of the stock RAM are? :confused:

Due to potential issues with TRIM I am a bit hesitant of using aftermarket SSDs... Not sure if I understand the problem, but as far as I can tell from the discussions on this forum (please see “SSD used in 2012 Mac mini” thread for details) Apple is not supporting any SSDs, but stock. :mad:

Can you guys please shed some light here for me? :)
 

RaceTripper

macrumors 68030
May 29, 2007
2,702
21
I got my mid-range Mac mini today and am currently running my Dell 30" display at 2560x1600 using a mDP->DP adapter.

It initially didn't sync so I booted it using a HDMI cable. Once I went through the basic new computer setup, I rebooted and it has worked fine since. I don't know if it was necessary part, but I reset PRAm when I rebooted.

I wouldn't bother with the Apple dual-link DVI adapter. It's expensive and has a reputation for being very flakey.
 

BigMa

macrumors member
Original poster
May 31, 2012
43
0
Excellent: mDP-DP is the way to go for me too! :)
Are you happy with the refresh rate? :confused:
 

RaceTripper

macrumors 68030
May 29, 2007
2,702
21
Excellent: mDP-DP is the way to go for me too! :)
Are you happy with the refresh rate? :confused:
Do you mean am I seeing any flicker? I'm not. I've been using this same monitor with a MacBook Pro for a few years and it all looks the same with the Mini.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.