is my cpu temp normal?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by alireza_asol, Aug 31, 2015.

  1. alireza_asol macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2015
    #1
    hi
    this is my cpu temp in idle and 200% usage
    i think its very high.
    what do you think? :)
    moshakhas.jpg idle.jpg sia cpu use1.jpg sia temp 89.jpg

    tnx :)
     
  2. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #2
    Yes that's normal. Ignore the 'red' as that gives you the impression it's bad.
     
  3. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #3
    Your temperatures are perfectly normal and nothing to be worried about. The computer has built-in mechanisms to prevent any chance of overheating. I suggest you remove all temperature monitoring apps you have installed, all they do is make you obsess over something you have no control over.

    You could've searched the forum and found one of the thousands (and I'm not exaggerating the number) of threads with the same subject, that have the same answer.

    I suggest you also learn how to make screenshots, you don't need to snap a picture of your screen with a phone/camera, the computer has that feature built in.

    https://support.apple.com/en-ca/HT201361
     
  4. alireza_asol thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2015
    #4
    ok thanks
    but why fan speed in first pic (when cpu temp is about 50) is higher than second pic ( temp about 90 ) ?
    tnx again:D
     
  5. alireza_asol thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2015
    #5
    :D
    its not my laptop :D
    i asked this question for my friend. and he sent pics by telegram for me. and fastest way to send pics by telegram is this.
     
  6. Smoothie macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2007
    Location:
    California
    #6
    In the world of Apple, those CPU temps may be normal, but they're not good. If you visit any site frequented by people who build their own computers, you always see lots of posts about CPU operating temps and how to reduce them. There's a reason for this. Heat shortens the life of electronic components. Yes, CPUs have upper limits (Tjunction Max) on temps that will produce throttling to prevent destroying the device, but constantly operating a CPU just below that limit will reduce the life of the CPU.

    Additionally, the heat from the CPU (and GPU) will get transferred to other components in the system, like the SSD and battery. Heat definitely shortens the lifespan of lithium batteries. The case of the MBP is crammed with components, so heat transfers between components more easily. Desktop builders have the luxury of choosing cases that permit good air flow to keep the components cooler.

    Assuming that HWMonitor is showing accurate temps for your system and that your room temp is in a normal range, I wouldn't want to be hitting almost 90 deg C for extended periods. The SSD temp looks OK, but that could increase the longer the system is running at full load. However, it's possible that the fan speed would have increased to bring the CPU temp down if you let your test run longer. Apple seems to delay ramping up fan speed, probably to reduce overall system noise.
     
  7. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #7
    Generally those are posts about 'desktop' machines.

    Mobile processors are by default designed for packaged cooling solutions.

    All laptops run warmer than desktops. If it were 'just apple' then apples Mac Pro would run hot too... It does not.
     
  8. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #8
    While what you say is right, it doesn't apply here. Your argument is flawed.

    Desktops chips =/= mobile chips. Nobody builds their own laptops. They build desktops, which have very different cooling needs.

    Mobile silicon is designed with higher temperatures in mind. Cramming all that power in such a tiny space tends to do that.
     
  9. Smoothie macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2007
    Location:
    California
    #9
    The OP's MBP has an Intel Core i7-4870HQ processor. Intel's specs for this processor show that Tjunction Max is 100 degrees C. A very popular desktop processor is the Intel Core i7-4790K. The Tjunction Max for this processor is also 100 degrees C. So both processors will throttle back at the SAME temp.

    With regard to mobile vs. desktop processors, the MBP processor has a Thermal Design Power of 47 watts vs. a TDP of 88 watts for the desktop processor. That's the power dissipated by the chip and requires different thermal solution requirements. Maybe you're thinking of this.

    Both a mobile CPU and a desktop CPU can be irreversibly damaged if operated above a certain temp. That's a product of semiconductor device physics. So Intel designs the chips to throttle back when the Tjunction Max reaches 100 degrees C. While operating at close to 90 degrees C won't trigger thermal throttling, if the CPU is operated at those temps for long periods of time, it will shorten the life of the CPU.
     
  10. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #10
    A cpu operated at those temps will more offen than not outlast the useful life of the device. Thermal degradation does indeed exist but your talking about a long time down the road.

    The cpu will throttle if it's run above 100 then it'll shut off at 105. The cooling solution Apple uses maintains this and the end user shouldn't be concerned. Why complicate things?
     
  11. Smoothie macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2007
    Location:
    California
    #11
    Gav, I'm not trying to complicate things. I'm just trying to correct misinformation. You seem to have backed off your contention that the rules are different for mobile chips.

    You acknowledge that thermal degradation exists, and you imply that the chip in question might outlast the useful life of the device. But you really don't know whether that will be "a long time down the road" or not. No two chips are identical even if they come off the same line at a semiconductor fab. One chip may fail prematurely where another may last long enough. It's also difficult to diagnose a problem when there is intermittent instability caused by heat. Running a chip just below its maximum safe operating temperature for long periods of time increases the probability of instability or failure. I don't think you'll find many people who disagree with this or believe that operating a CPU at very high temps is a good thing.

    The other problem more specific to laptops is that they're usually turned on and off frequently. If they're running hot while they're on, the increased thermal cycling can cause failures of its own due to metal fatigue in conductors or solder joints. Finally, as I mentioned before, heat isn't good for the battery and could shorten its useful life.

    So getting back to the OP's question, I wouldn't be so quick to brush off his concerns about CPU temps. If I were using a laptop to run applications for long periods of time that pushed CPU temps near 90 degrees C, I'd think about running those applications on a desktop with better cooling.
     
  12. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #12
    I've not backed off, mobile cpu's are designed with that usage in mind hence the lower wattage. That's clear to see
     

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