is my mac air faulty? ..fan issue

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by RolledUp20s, Jun 8, 2012.

  1. RolledUp20s macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2011
    Location:
    Wrexham, North Wales
    #1
    I have a 13'' Macbook Air, 1.7 GHz i5, 4 GB 1333 MHz DDR3.
    its running Lion 10.7.4

    I bought it in February, New.

    When i'm watching a video - eg, the E3 latest press conferences the fan noise gets ridiculous & i feel it getting very hot.

    This also happens when i plug in my thunderbolt-HDMI cable, when watching films through my TV, the mac heats up, fans kick in..loud.
    Surely it shouldnt get hot just watching a video?
    ..once i close the video it cools down again.

    should i take it back?
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    Yes, that's quite normal.

    Your Mac is not overheating. The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C, GPU Tjmax = 100C on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel) If you're not already using it, iStat Pro will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If they're spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks. The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  3. RolledUp20s thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2011
    Location:
    Wrexham, North Wales
    #3
    wow, thanks for that reply. i was worrying when the fans kicked in like that, but from you've said that's eased my mind :)

    i have got iStat nano and the readings always seem 'normal', even when the fans are blowing my house down.
    i dont watch alot of films or streams on my mac, which is why when i do.. the heat and fans make me fret...i'll take a chill pill now though.

    1 more thing though, when i do hook it up to my TV should i close the lid?
    my iphone connects via TouchPad and works with lid down..just wasn't sure whether that was causing over-heating? ..so ive sinc left lid open with screen dimmed 'off' ..but still kicks in anyway after abit :)
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    You can if you like. Mac notebooks are designed to run with the lid closed and an external display attached (clamshell mode). There is no venting through the keyboard, so it won't cause your Mac to overheat. The temps may increase a bit as there is less heat dissipation with the lid closed, but not enough to be problematic.
     
  5. applerepairs macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2011
    Location:
    Fulham, London
    #5
    either heat sink is faulty or problem with logic board, But No issue but are repairable
     
  6. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #6
    That's not necessarily true. From what the OP described, it's simply normal workload causing increases in temps and fan speeds. That's not an indication of any hardware problem.
     
  7. dona83 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Location:
    Coquitlam, BC

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