Is my mac too hot?

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by alex.purple.mac, Jun 21, 2010.

  1. alex.purple.mac macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    #1
    Im wondering if my mac is too hot? It normally sticks to 32 degrees at the most, but when i use it in clamshell mode it goes up to 36, im assuming this is because heat doesn't dissipate as well when its closed.

    Attached is a pic of my temp stats, what do you think? Fans are at 6000 rpm.

    Ive ordered some arctic silver 5 and when it arrives im going to reapply it to see if i can cool it down.

    EDIT: what on earth is enclosure bottom and why is it at -128 degrees?

    This is all in celsius btw.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #2
    To me that seems to be average for idle. Nothing seems to be overheating.

    Secondly I would suggest you not reapply the thermal paste, you could really damage you Mac if you don't know what your doing.
     
  3. alex.purple.mac thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    #3
    Tbh its not idling, i have skype on, spotify on, time machine on and backing up, safari on with 5 tabs. its not the temp that has me worried, its the fans, theyve been at 6k for 15 mins now
     
  4. Pax macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2003
    #4
    It looks like you have a faulty enclosure temperature sensor. The enclosure bottom temperature is reading wrong - it should be 30 to 35 C.

    Error readings like this can cause the Mac to go into fail safe mode where it runs the fans at full speed.

    The enclosure temperature sensors are very cheap. It might even just need plugging in again. Has anyone opened your Mac recently?

    Also I think you have iStat Menus (if that is what you are using) set up wrong. The temperature being reported in the menu bar is 36 C which is the HDD temperature. Your CPU is at 61 C. You can change what the menu bar shows by reconfiguring iStat.

    IMHO applying AS5 is not worthwhile. Why? Look at the temperature difference between your CPU and your heatsink. It's only 5 or 6 C. That means there is pretty good thermal contact between the two. Your Apple-applied thermal paste is doing its job well. I doubt that applying AS5 would significantly improve your CPU temperatures either at idle or at full load.

    But having said all that, if your fans are at 6000 rpm your CPU (and heatsinks) should be cooler than that. It may be that you have a blockage in the air flow (dust?). I would expect to see CPU and heatsink temperatures of 50-60 C with the fans at 2000 rpm.

    So I think
    - your fans are at 6000 rpm because of the faulty temperature sensor
    - AS5 not worth it, thermal contact between CPU and heatsink looks OK at the moment
    - you may have a blocked airflow, your CPU & heatsink should be cooler at 6000 rpm.

    hope that helps!
     
  5. alex.purple.mac thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    #5
    Thanks very much.
    However no one has opened up my macbook, so i dont know why the sensor would have come unplugged, must have just stopped working. The fans are back to normal now though, 1800 rpms of silence :D

    If it starts again ill open it up and see what the problem is with that sensor.

    Thanks for you help, and i wont bother with the thermal paste.
     
  6. andalusia macrumors 68030

    andalusia

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #6
    Are you running your computer with the battery out?
     
  7. johnnyham macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    #7
    36ºC is roughly human body temperature. relatively cool for your HDD temp. 61ºC is your CPU temp, which is average. Mine usually runs around 55-65ºC. I'd tone down your fans though, 6000 RPM will really suck down your battery. There's software to do that, I use smcfancontrol to keep mine running around 1700. You're probably fine without Arctic Silver, unless your CPU has become loose or is consistently up above 70ºC.

    The -128ºC is because the Macbook actually produces liquid helium. Just kidding :) Temperature software is usually designed for both Macbook and Macbook Pro. Macbooks only have two temperature sensors (I think) while the Pros have three (one extra fan in there too). Since there's no data feeding to it, it spits out a negative value.

    Also, make sure you turn your backlight off before putting it in clamshell. The heat it puts out adds to the heat of the Macbook, and the extra heat can severely damage your LCD screen if left closed for two long.
     
  8. alust2013 macrumors 601

    alust2013

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Location:
    On the fence
    #8
    This is not true. In clamshell mode, neither the backlight or the LCD itself will (or should) turn on, so there is no need to kill the backlight. Anytime I am doing anything heavy on mine in clamshell, I actually open the lid, but it still stays in clamshell mode with display off, but is able to let extra heat out.
     
  9. alex.purple.mac thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    #9
    When you said that about liquid helium i was like WTF?! LOL.

    And i have that smc fan control but as far as i can tell you can only control the minimum, not the maximum?
     
  10. andalusia macrumors 68030

    andalusia

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #10
    Are you running your laptop without it's battery?

    And yes, that's true about SMC.
     
  11. johnnyham macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    #11
    I use InsomniaX to keep mine running in clamshell rather than having it hooked up to an external monitor and waking it up via USB. InsomniaX leaves the backlight on, so I always have to remember to turn the backlight off. Sorry for the lack of clarification.

    Yeah, you're right you can only control the minimum speed. I had it confused with the FanControl preference pane. That lets you set a minimum and maximum temperature, essentially let you set a maximum and minimum fan speed.
     
  12. andalusia macrumors 68030

    andalusia

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #12
    InsomniaX did the same thing for me. Now part of my LCD is burnt out (only mildly). Try Sleepless, it does a far better job than InsomniaX.
     
  13. johnnyham macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    #13
    Except Sleepless costs $9.50. As a student paying off loans, I'll stick with any freeware I can find.
     
  14. alex.purple.mac thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    #14
    Ye i am using it without its battery. This may be why its reading -128 degrees all of a sudden, because its never done this before.

    Im assuming it wont do any damage to my mac running it without its battery, i wouldve thought it would be better for the battery to just run the mac off the mains?
     
  15. Pax macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2003
    #15
    I don't think it will do any damage, but

    - I believe the CPU runs slower when on battery (use Google, the Apple site will confirm this). Because the power supply can't always provide enough power for high CPU load spikes, the CPU power/speed is turned down

    - I doubt it will make your battery last longer. When your battery is fully charged the Mac stops applying power to it, the battery just "floats" without any volts being applied to it. So leaving the battery fully charged & inside the Mac is no different to taking it out

    Your battery should last ages without you worrying about it. There is a small chance it will fail early, but I think most last years and years without any special treatment.
     
  16. johnnyham macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    #16
    Apple's batteries are built with a microprocessor in there that tells the computer how much charge is left, how long to charge it, etc. Once it hits 100%, it pretty much closes the power flood gates, so there's no need to take it out.

    I remember there being a lot of hype about people leaving their batteries out of like their Thinkbooks to extend life, but that was because those batteries were poorly designed. Once they reach 100%, the computer kept feeding them a slight trickle charge, which, over time, will reduce its life. I bought a replacement battery for my first Macbook (early 2006) back in January 2008, and it's still kicking strong with 5 hours of battery life. I keep it charged up along with my extra battery so I always have two fully charged batteries just incase I get stuck on a ten hour layover :)
     
  17. andalusia macrumors 68030

    andalusia

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #17
    That is why your temperature reading is so wrong then. I would recommend putting the battery back in, as others have explained in this thread - the two posters above me are correct.
     
  18. alex.purple.mac thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    #18
    Youre right about that enclosure reading thing, when i put the battery back in the bottom enclosure went to 21 degrees

    thanks for all your help guys, looks like i need to clear some dust out of my mac, any advice? will i have to open it up?
     
  19. unixperience macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010
    #19
    I've noticed when the battery is fully charged and still plugged in my comp gets a bit warm to the left side of the trackpad(where the battery ios) taking it out really cools it down. I just figured it was because the battery was refusing energy, so this energy was just dissipated as heat.

    Anyone else notice a warm... fully charged battery?
     
  20. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #20
    The battery doesn't generate heat like the CPU and GPU. Also, it is not recommended to run your Mac on the A/C adaptor with the battery out (Of course, this only applies to removable batteries).
     
  21. JRoDDz macrumors 68000

    JRoDDz

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2009
    Location:
    NYC

Share This Page