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coldbitter

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Sep 17, 2022
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0
I always wondered why Apple didn't build an eBook reader, given that neither of the existing devices are suited for long time reading sessions (screen brightness, battery performance, etc), and they have a quite compelling Apple Books service.

So with the launch of the new always-on-display technology (1Hz refresh rate, and dimmed brightness), is Apple effectively able to make the iPhone (and potentially in the future iPads) a fully capable eBook reader without having to sell a new hardware device? With that said, I haven't seen any mention of this new use case promoted by Apple, and I wonder what would be the current limitations for Apple to leverage it in their marketing communications.
 

WildSky

macrumors 603
Apr 16, 2020
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East of the sun, west of the moon
Not sure I understand your thoughts about this. The Books app is Apple's e-book reader and is available on iPads, iPhones and Macs. Why would they need to introduce another one? Also not sure what you mean about "neither of the existing devices are suited ...". Many of us use one or more devices quite comfortably for this.
 

coldbitter

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Sep 17, 2022
3
0
I am not talking about the software side of an ebook reader but the hardware. iPhones and iPads up until recently didn’t have the technologies to provide an optimal ebook reading experience (too much battery consumption, screen brightness, etc). Seems that with the latest technologies in the iPhone 14 line, these devices seem to have these technologies and I wonder if this is the end of a road in which Apple finally provides a fully integrated ebook reading experience like Kindle.
 

WildSky

macrumors 603
Apr 16, 2020
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East of the sun, west of the moon
I wasn't referring only to the software either. For some of us the experience of reading on an iPad or Mac is already fully integrated, using Books or Kindle apps, library-specific systems like Overdrive, Libby, or Cloud library and others. Kindles are nice but they don't work with my state's ebook library system.

You almost make it sound like a subpar experience, which doesn't ring true for some of us. I have no issue with the battery consumption or screen brightness. You're talking about your preferences, and maybe things will evolve on Apple devices that will make it easier for you to enjoy ebook reading. For some of us, we've got that now and it works well.
 
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coldbitter

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Sep 17, 2022
3
0
Ah, that makes a lot of sense. Indeed my assumption was that it is a subpar experience, but that seems not to be the case for everyone. In any case, this might move the needle for some people that might have similar reading needs as mine.
 

myscrnnm

macrumors 68000
Sep 16, 2014
1,639
1,182
Seattle, WA
I am not talking about the software side of an ebook reader but the hardware. iPhones and iPads up until recently didn’t have the technologies to provide an optimal ebook reading experience (too much battery consumption, screen brightness, etc). Seems that with the latest technologies in the iPhone 14 line, these devices seem to have these technologies and I wonder if this is the end of a road in which Apple finally provides a fully integrated ebook reading experience like Kindle.
If you're talking about the hardware aspect, Apple doesn't make their devices ebook readers because LCDs and LEDs aren't suited for that purpose at all, regardless of battery consumption and screen brightness. Actual ebooks use e-ink, because that technology requires no energy at all when displaying static images, and most importantly require no backlight to function. LCD and LED panels that can also be used for tablet computers aren't any good when you turn the brightness down because whatever is displayed just becomes indecipherable. We're still a long way from being able to viably use those types of display panels for an ereader. The always-on display is just to allow anything you'd see on the lockscreen to be able to be viewed continuously.
 

Sword86

macrumors 6502
Oct 6, 2012
345
162
I wasn't referring only to the software either. For some of us the experience of reading on an iPad or Mac is already fully integrated, using Books or Kindle apps, library-specific systems like Overdrive, Libby, or Cloud library and others. Kindles are nice but they don't work with my state's ebook library system.

You almost make it sound like a subpar experience, which doesn't ring true for some of us. I have no issue with the battery consumption or screen brightness. You're talking about your preferences, and maybe things will evolve on Apple devices that will make it easier for you to enjoy ebook reading. For some of us, we've got that now and it works well.
Kindles are great devices and Amazon has the best selection of books by far. As far as not being able to get your local library books on a Kindle, I have just one word for you. Calibre. S
 

WildSky

macrumors 603
Apr 16, 2020
5,832
4,660
East of the sun, west of the moon
Kindles are great devices and Amazon has the best selection of books by far. As far as not being able to get your local library books on a Kindle, I have just one word for you. Calibre. S
Yes, I'm very familiar with Calibre, and it's been around for many years. When I want an ebook, I use the library's ebook software via its app or browser on my iPad or Mac. It's very good. I don't need a Kindle or want to add another device to my mix, nor do I want to pay Amazon's prices for books. Been there, done that.
 

ArchEtech

macrumors regular
Sep 25, 2022
219
180
I don’t know but the new screens are defiantly better for ebooks. I am impressed with the 14’s screen. It’s very crisp and really has way more than my 12 mini to have very low brightness.

This might seem like kind of an odd benefit, but it actually is really handy.
 
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