Is the i7-7Y75 MacBook running hot/hotter than the i5-7Y54?

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by effineji, Jun 12, 2017.

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Is the i7-7Y75 MacBook 12" 2017 hot?

  1. It gets hot!

    16.7%
  2. No / Not hotter than the other models.

    83.3%
  1. effineji macrumors newbie

    effineji

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2017
    Location:
    Germany
    #1
    Hello, first time poster here.

    I'm on the fence about getting the i7 MacBook 12" 2017. I plan to max it out to 16GB RAM, but I'm wanting it to be a cool machine (only slightly warm to the touch - below 32C on the palm rest and 35C on the underside, where it would rest on the lap).

    Looking at reviews of the Dell XPS 2-in-1, the i7 model seems much hotter than the i5 model.
    i7 - https://www.notebookcheck.net/Dell-XPS-13-9365-2-in-1-Convertible-Review.193704.0.html#c2689478
    i5 - https://www.notebookcheck.net/Dell-XPS-13-9365-7Y54-QHD-Convertible-Review.224056.0.html#c3127816

    Other laptops using the i7-7Y75 don't seem to be showing as high a temperatures as the XPS 13 2-in-1 though.

    However, looking at the 2016 MacBook models there doesn't seem to be much difference between the different models.
    https://www.notebookcheck.net/Face-...m3-Core-m5-and-Core-m7.172046.0.html#c2418639

    Does anybody have a i7 or i5 model that they can comment on?
    If anyone has any good educated guesses as well, let me know :)

    Thanks!
     
  2. Saturn007 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    #2
    +1

    I'd like to know what people's experiences are relative to the MacBook running hot -- does it get too warm to use in one's lap or on partly on one's legs when in shorts?!
     
  3. Collo macrumors newbie

    Collo

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2017
    #3
    They are still m5 and m7 processors, just rebranded by Intel for some reason.

    Although the slightly higher clock rate of the i5, i7 in the macbook will result in more heat development, the system monitors this and lowers power consumption / speed when it reaches certain temperatures.
     
  4. Buerkletucson macrumors 6502

    Buerkletucson

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2015
    #4
    Absolutely depends on what your doing with the machine.....
    Normal everyday tasks it's cool and not an issue.

    But, start running some CPU intensive programs or running some hi-Res video for longer periods and it can get pretty warm on the bottom of the machine.
    IMHO the MacBook is not intended for continuous CPU intensive programs. It's a lightweight, small footprint, mobile machine for lighter duty work.

    There are other machines designed for the HD work....
     
  5. Significant1 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2014
    #5
    I don't have the Macbook 12", but an i7 Macbook air 11". If I am doing something, where I want it to stay cool I am using Turbo Boost Switcher.
    http://www.rugarciap.com/
    Then it can run for hours and still stay cool. E.g. watching a movie in your lap, playing a game etc.

    Only annoyance is to enter password, when you toggle status and after sleep. But I see now that they have a paid version, where that is not needed and some other features. So I might consider buying an license.
     

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