Is the new Mac Mini Socketed?

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by HyperX, Mar 4, 2009.

  1. HyperX macrumors regular

    HyperX

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    #1
    I have seen one person say that it was not, but I think they may have not dug deep enough or known what to look for. The Old mac Mini had a standard Socket but it wasn't done in the normal Lever way *it was tension based from the bottom of the board*.

    I find it hard to believe that apple would offer a 2.26GHZ upgrade option and solder the processor on the board. This would SIGNIFICANTLY increase apples manufacturing cost *since they couldn't just pop on the processor they needed, they would need a specific amount of board A and board B*.

    If someone does some dismantling and could remove the heatsink, snap some shot of the processor and underside of the mainboard... That would answer ALOT of questions.

    It's safe to say that the new mac mini uses the P7350 and P8400 processors. If it's socketed then there is a CHANCE it will take a P8700, or X9100 if we are lucky on Voltage OR If we are STUPID LUCKY a Q9000, Q9100, or QX9300 *Dear LORDS a Quad Core Mac Mini would be YUM*.

    *Wipes Drool from his Mouth* So if someone could get to some deep dissection, that would be Awesome ;)
     
  2. Migsy macrumors newbie

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    #2
    I too have heard that they do not use sockets, which makes perfect sense to me. The only reason to use a socket is if you intend the CPU to be user upgradable, which Apple obviously does not. Changing CPU types also doesnt cost any more in manafacturing, because one day you just put the 2.26 GHz CPUs into the surface-mounting machine instead of 2.0 CPUs. The only increased cost therefore is in inventory management, which isnt really that much. The increast price of the upgraded CPU more than makes up for this additional overhead.

    If they were to use sockets, you would need the CPUs to be installed by a human instead of a machine, increasing the costs even further.
     
  3. TrapOx macrumors 6502

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    #3
    That makes zero sense. A machine can't grab a CPU, put it in the socket and turn the little locking screw?
     
  4. HyperX thread starter macrumors regular

    HyperX

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    #4
    Keyboards in China are assembled by humans *placing the keys manually on the board* rather then machines, because its cheaper. If the chips are soldered on, it's done by manual labor in a factory and not some machine *in this day and age*.

    You loose major Flexibility and increase cost in todays Slave Labor 3rd worlds manufacturing. The only reason to NOT go socketed would be to keep people from upgrading themselves. You also MASSIVELY increase repair and refurbishing costs if you have a bad board or bad chip you gotta chuck both. If it's socketed you simply keep the good component and recycle the bad part. When dealing with a tiny enclosed case where heat is a problem and components like to POP, yes... yes you would want to make fixing the system easier.

    So either way, lets wait till we have someone dig deep, get us some pics, and show us some evidence either way.
     
  5. old-wiz macrumors G3

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    #5
    CPU chips have hundreds of pins; no human can solder that well in such a small space. Generally they do not repair boards either; they simply get chucked into a recycle bin since it costs more to find and make a repair than make a new board. Even back in the 1990s IBM stopped repairing motherboards since the labor to diagnose a problem and fix it was more than the cost of the board.
     
  6. HyperX thread starter macrumors regular

    HyperX

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    #6
    Humans CAN do it, as they used to do it to make Dream Boxes *Modified Xboxes with CPU replaced by hand soldering*

    Yeah they recycle motherboards, my POINT is its not cost efficient to chuck the processor with the motherboard ever defect, hence a socket WOULD make more sense.

    *Keeps waiting till someone gives proof one way or the other*
     
  7. Superman07 macrumors 6502a

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    #7
    I wonder if all of the chips are 2.26 and Apple is simply underclocking those that are sold at the stores. If you custom order they swap a jumper or change a setting.
     
  8. Migsy macrumors newbie

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    #8
    Have you even seen surface mount machines in action?

    Yes, humans *can* do it, but the time taken is measured in minutes, while surface mounting them is measured in less than a second. Even if the human cost was ZERO, it would still cost more to the business because of the time involved.
     
  9. TechViking macrumors regular

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    Mar 3, 2009
    #9
    So is it or not? Photo evidence please! If you open up your mini to add more RAM etcetera please get to the CPU and snap a high res photo.
     
  10. reebzor macrumors 6502a

    reebzor

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    #10
    come on guys, give it a day or two until someone gets one and rips it open. thats the only way we'll know for sure.
     
  11. Superman07 macrumors 6502a

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    #11
    This is from ifixit.com and their teardown of the new 20" iMac:

    I wouldn't be surprised things are the same on the Mini.

    http://www.ifixit.com/Guide/First-Look/iMac-20-Inch/658/3
     
  12. HyperX thread starter macrumors regular

    HyperX

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    #12
  13. tobyg macrumors 6502a

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    #13
    It's not socketed, as stated in my other posts.
     
  14. HyperX thread starter macrumors regular

    HyperX

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    #14
    You didn't take off enough clothing to make sure it's really a woman and not a man in drag ;P
     
  15. tobyg macrumors 6502a

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    #15
    If you say so. Mine, at least, is not socketed. See that picture of the new iMac with the socket? Yeah, this looks nothing like it.

    But you can keep your hopes up. Good luck with that.
     
  16. HyperX thread starter macrumors regular

    HyperX

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    #16
    The old mac mini was socketed but in a very weird way. It required you release the chip by pinching 4 bit from the underside of the board to release it. So it didnt look like a normal socket from regular inspection.

    It could be unsocketed, but that would be very weird since apple has not been soldering intel chips.
     
  17. tobyg macrumors 6502a

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    #17
    Every Macbook and Macbook Pro has soldered chips.
     
  18. TechViking macrumors regular

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    #18

    tobyg, would it be possible for you to snap a photo of the cpu? So that we can have a look? :)
     
  19. Superman07 macrumors 6502a

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    #19
    I think he already put it back together and probably isn't itching to tear everything apart again. ;)
     
  20. tobyg macrumors 6502a

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    #20
    Mine is still apart. But I'm not removing the heat sink. I can see the chip underneath the heatsink when I shine a flash light underneath. I can see the glue around the chip, I can see the ball grid array, so I'm satisfied it's not socketed.

    I'll let someone else take pics with the heat sink removed. I'm personally satisfied enough to know it's not socketed. I would hope someone would prove me wrong when they actually do remove the heatsink, but I'm 95% sure it's not socketed from what I can see.
     
  21. TechViking macrumors regular

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    Mar 3, 2009
    #21
    Just to make this crystal clear (for me and perhaps others), what would be the opposite of socketed?

    Or rather: how is the CPU 'attached' to the board? You mention glue?

    And is there no way of replacing the CPU that is 'attached' to the board the way that the CPU is on the new mini?
     
  22. rrijkers macrumors 6502

    rrijkers

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    #22
    Lets hope it will be possible to replace the CPU as was the case with previous models.
     
  23. tobyg macrumors 6502a

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    #23
    Take a look at this page:

    http://www.ifixit.com/Guide/First-Look/MacBook-Pro-17-Inch-Unibody/618/3

    See that glue on the corners of the CPU? Well that's what I can see. I can also see the BGA (ball grid array, google that if you want more info, that will tell you how its attached to the motherboard).
     
  24. TechViking macrumors regular

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    #24
    Yes I see the glue, thanks.

    So is it impossible, or just very,very hard to replace a cpu attached like this?
     
  25. Drumerdude macrumors member

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    Feb 15, 2009
    #25
    I would think that it is just very hard. You might have to put new glue or some type of sealence to make sure the cpu doesn't fall out, if it is possible.
     

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