Is the public beta stable enough to use on my daily driver?

Discussion in 'macOS High Sierra (10.13)' started by OGPrince, Aug 19, 2017.

  1. OGPrince macrumors regular

    OGPrince

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    #1
    I have a 2015 macbook pro 15in and I already use ios 11 on my iPhone 7, is the high sierra beta stable enough to run as my daily driver. I use my laptop for school.
     
  2. LarryJoe33 macrumors 65816

    LarryJoe33

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2017
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    Oh boy, in short, there are a ton of threads asking the same question including the term daily driver. Try searching, but based on the limited information you provided on what your daily drive is, I will assume it is email, surfing, messaging, social media and writing a paper or two. It should be fine.
     
  3. fisherking macrumors 603

    fisherking

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Location:
    ny somewhere
    #3
    it's an impossible question. if you install it and all is well, the answer's yes. if you install it and have problems, the answer's probably no.

    it's a beta; it is an os in development. there WILL always be some issues with a beta. but you should know this as you're running ios11, so... make a choice, and accept the consequences. if you decide to do it, back up your mac first (i made a bootable backup in carbon copy cloner, but all is well here).
     
  4. jim_0117 macrumors newbie

    jim_0117

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    May 28, 2017
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    Yardley, PA
    #4
    Personally I wouldn't use anything labeled as a beta other than CoD: WWII
     
  5. Fishrrman macrumors G5

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #5
    If you have to ask this (the original) question, then... you probably shouldn't be using it as such.
     
  6. LarryJoe33 macrumors 65816

    LarryJoe33

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2017
    Location:
    Boston
    #6
    You love that auto reply Fishrrman. I guess I don't mind the question as much as long as there is some context with it. Not this one for sure where it's just a blanket "Should I". If people ask the right questions and state their usage profile, I don't mind answering (from experience) and can see why someone would ask before taking the plunge. I don't think it is as black and white as "if you have to ask"...

    I don't mind being helpful, makes for a good forum.
     
  7. fisherking macrumors 603

    fisherking

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Location:
    ny somewhere
    #7
    sure, but there's no 'one answer fits all'. some people have a good (or at least workable) experience with the betas, others have a harder time. it's not a simple 'yes or no' question, and so, reasonable that if someone has to ask this, they probably shouldn't be running a beta...
     
  8. LarryJoe33 macrumors 65816

    LarryJoe33

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2017
    Location:
    Boston
    #8
    I guess, but I could see myself asking the question with context to see if there is something that may really be an issue with my usage profile and hardware. We are on beta 6 I believe? (lost track with the recent numbering fiasco). It's not exactly like beta 1.
     
  9. rugmankc Contributor

    rugmankc

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2014
    #9
    I agree with both of you. If asking, maybe not a good idea. You need to be prepared with backups and know how to get out of trouble. Also, what works for one user may not for another. That's probably the biggest thing to understand. Saw lots of that rooting Androids. I see a lot of, "never use betas on your daily driver", that would be my response. No expert on iPhone betas, as i got tired of dealing with the rooting issues and the constant work of keeping up with all the different Roms coming out and how to flash them semi-safely.
     
  10. KUKitch macrumors 6502

    KUKitch

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Location:
    England
    #10
    From my experience, it seems to work just fine... I've got High Sierra now on my new 2017 MBP, had it on my 2012 for the first few revisions as well and it was functional from version to version. I've also got iOS 11 on my iPhone and iPP and watchOS 4 and tvOS 11 and they're all working pretty decently, but I am open to working to correct things if they go haywire as sometimes occurs with betas... did the same with roms on android back in the day
     
  11. LarryJoe33 macrumors 65816

    LarryJoe33

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2017
    Location:
    Boston
    #11
    I guess my rule of thumb, have an easy method to restore to Sierra. For me, Carbon Copy Cloner is the way to go. Piece of cake getting back. Zero risk in trying a beta knowing I have this.
     
  12. TokMok3 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2015
    #12

    I installed beta 6 in this week 3 times and I had to reinstall macOS Sierra because the MacBook Pro was over heating and slower. With Beta 6, it took more than 12 hours to encrypt the drive, and file system was modified, to fixed I had to restart the MacBook Pro in protected mode to format the drive in order to reinstall macOS Sierra. In my opinion is not stable enough yet.
     
  13. macdragonfl macrumors 6502

    macdragonfl

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2006
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale,Fl
    #13
    Another thumbs up to CCC, would clone existing and make it bootable, simple, easy and very little risk. At this point in the beta process especially the last, many of the big issues are worked out. Also the best way to put in a new drive or upgrade to ssd internal or external.
     
  14. fisherking macrumors 603

    fisherking

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Location:
    ny somewhere
    #14
    but this is the whole point, not everyone's experience is the same. i mean, i've been running the betas on my main mac since the public beta system was first introduced; i've always gotten my work done, but certainly not without some serious challenges. and that's my choice. and yes, CCC (or the equiv) is an essential element (not that i've EVER reverted to a previous OS). if you install any beta, you're choosing to possibly take on some challenges...
     
  15. LarryJoe33 macrumors 65816

    LarryJoe33

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2017
    Location:
    Boston
    #15
    Yeah, CCC5 is very close to final and can handle APFS both ways (read/write). They really produced this functionality very quickly. I am tempted to convert my backup external drive to APFS, but to be safe I will leave it as HFS+ for now.
     
  16. ryxn macrumors regular

    ryxn

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2017
    #16
    Like the others have said, this question is asked quite frequently and doing a quick search would help you decide for yourself. I was recently a student myself, and I did betas from time to time but didn't suffer much. Just do a backup using CCC as mentioned above or something similar, and have a little bit of patience. If you rely on third-party software especially for crucial student work, do some research on if other users have had issues or not. Some web-based platforms, like Blackboard, which is used frequently by students, can be a little difficult to work with at times.
     
  17. SoYoung macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2015
    #17
    Personally, I don't mind install beta's on my phone because its easy to just restore if things dont work as expected, but on my main computer? No, I avoid beta's. I want my computer to be stable and reliable and don't have the time to re-install the entire OS and backup if things go wrong. At the end, its a your choice.

    But honnestly, there's nothing in high sierra that I just can't wait to try. In fact, this year the update don't hype me at all. I'll probably wait a .1 or .2 update just to make sure initial bugs are fixed.
     
  18. lemonkid macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2015
    #18
    Any beta is always stable enough...... to TRY.....

    When you encounter problems feel free to post them here! I will read it!
     
  19. fisherking macrumors 603

    fisherking

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Location:
    ny somewhere
    #19
    ok, but then why are you on the high sierra forum? anyway, for me, it's the under-the-hood refinements and changes that intrigue me about a new OS, less so the new eye candy and 'features'.
     

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