Is this a good deal for top end rMBP?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by Gary500, Jul 24, 2014.

  1. Gary500 macrumors regular

    Gary500

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    Nov 25, 2009
    #1
    $1850 for a rMPB (late 2013) with 2.6 CPU and 512 TB SSD and Nvidia 750m. This retails for $2800 on Apple's store when configured and with tax is over $3k. So is this a good deal?
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

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    #2
    Since it is now almost 1.000 USD cheaper before tax, it seems to be quite a good deal, some would say too good to be true.
     
  3. dukeblue219 macrumors member

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    Dec 18, 2012
    #3
    Is this somebody you know selling it? If they're willing to do it, go for it. Craigslist? I'd look over the thing damned closely (in a public place) before paying for it. Online from an unknown seller? Just a scam.
     
  4. Gary500, Jul 25, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2014

    Gary500 thread starter macrumors regular

    Gary500

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    #4
    Its on craigslist, we're meeting in a public place. Guy said it's never been used and it has AppleCare until 2017. I'll check the charge cycles...what else should I check? That I can use my Apple ID and log on and everything? Never owned a Mac before...
     
  5. kingtj macrumors 68020

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    #5
    Well.... frankly ....

    I'd ask if he's willing to give you its serial number ahead of time, so you can verify it. If he refuses, that's a HUGE warning sign the laptop is stolen and he knows it.

    Honestly, you never know. There are the people who get a new computer like this, only to start a new job where one is supplied for them -- or the people who receive one as a gift from someone trying to get them to switch from Windows or whatever, and they don't want to. It *could* be a great deal. But Craigslist is also a very popular place to fence your stolen items.


     
  6. Gary500 thread starter macrumors regular

    Gary500

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    #6
    Cool, so what do I do with the serial number? What exactly does the serial number reveal? Should I check to see if it has AppleCare or what?
     
  7. kingtj macrumors 68020

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    #7
    re: serial number

    Well, I don't believe Apple maintains a database of stolen products -- but you can check the third-party list that PowerMax maintains:

    http://www.powermax.com/stolen/

    Apple lets you verify the product's warranty status though, here:

    https://selfsolve.apple.com/agreementWarrantyDynamic.do


     
  8. Epiphron macrumors regular

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  9. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #9
    The problem is there is no certain way to tell if it is stolen. Unless this is a close personal friend you can trust, I would be VERY suspicious of anybody selling a brand new Mac.
     
  10. Epiphron macrumors regular

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    #10
    But would he be in any actual legal trouble if he unknowingly bought a stolen Mac?
     
  11. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #11
    First off it's a bad idea to feed criminals. They go after things that they can sell, so the buyers are part of the problem. To answer the other question you may be liable for receiving stolen goods, and the original owner may be able to lock that system on you, making it useless. I would want to see some proof of purchase on such a new item.
     
  12. Epiphron macrumors regular

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    #12
    It could be stolen. But it also may not be. It shouldn't be that big of a worry if it's still in shrink wrap (and you check the serial number) and use some common sense. If it's a good deal, I'd say go for it

    Also I found prices are heavily based on location. My friend bought an excellent condition 16gb ram/512gb SSD/650m 2012 MBPr for $1000 off craigslist. He lives in the south central valley of California where the population is sparse.
     
  13. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #13
    No, but knowingly is very subjective. I can just tell you that in most US jurisdictions the legal standard is knew or should have known given the circumstances. For example, paying far below market value would be one of the things that a prosecutor could argue shows you should have known.

    Aside from criminal culpability, one also stands to have that laptop taken back by the police even if they don't seek prosecution.

    Like thekev mentioned, unless the seller can prove they bought it, I would run away. :eek:
     
  14. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #14
    Why would it be in shrinkwrap? If it was, why wouldn't the person simply return it? People do not keep these things beyond the return date without even opening them. That would be absurd, and that includes the case of gifts. If someone gives you a gift that costs that much, you probably know them well enough to admit that you're in need of the money. The serial number doesn't provide you with a lot of information, which is why I mentioned proof of purchase. They would have purchased it within the last year, so they should still have that.
     
  15. Epiphron macrumors regular

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    #15

    I think that may be a tad presumptuous
     
  16. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #16
    Why is that? I mentioned that if the thing is new in shrinkwrap and they don't want it, they're more likely to return it. Otherwise it's not a great burden to check proof of purchase. A receipt is typical, and it's not like people pay for these things in cash. I wouldn't want to carry that much in my wallet. You haven't posted a single rational response on this. Also keep in mind I don't make some of the borderline weird suggestions that sometimes come up in these threads, such as requesting any kind of identification. It is normal to take reasonable measures to ensure that you don't buy stolen goods. Otherwise they may be reclaimed by the police. The original owner might lock it on you via find my mac. You may be liable for receiving stolen goods.
     
  17. Epiphron macrumors regular

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    #17

    The thing is you're assuming all the negative possibilities for your specific use case. What if what you assume is not what actually happened? Perhaps it was a gift? Perhaps it was a company computer they received but don't need? Perhaps they have family who works at Apple or a distributor?

    The thing is, these are all based on assumptions and possibilities. You have no concrete proof that it's stolen. Likewise I cannot refute that it is.
     
  18. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #18
    Wait what? Okay if it's a company computer, they probably do not have the right to sell it. In fact depending on circumstances that may be illegal to sell something purchased for work purposes and written off either amortized or section..... ahhh can't remember the number without looking at an return. The problem is that they have to declare salvage value on it (again would have to look at my returns), and I'm making the assumption that you refer to someone who received a computer from his/her employer. Otherwise it makes even less sense. If they were the owner and didn't require one, they wouldn't buy it in the first place. If it was that expensive of a gift and still in shrinkwrap, why wouldn't they return it? I think I mentioned this. If you know someone well enough to receive a $3000 gift from them, you should be comfortable indicating that you would like to return it because you need to use the money for some different reason. No one wants to see $1000 go to waste like that. Family discount is typically 15% off, but they may have other periodic stuff. In any case that still doesn't indicate why they would want to sell it.

    When it comes to a buyer, I suggest that they err on the side of caution, which should not be difficult. They should buy with confidence or not at all, as I do. I addressed the case of a gift. Otherwise what makes it such a burden to show proof of purchase on something that significant from the past 12 months?
     
  19. Epiphron macrumors regular

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    #19

    Umm.. Clearly you don't realize some things about the big tech companies.

    Some companies give company gifts for free to their employees or at massive discounts. I worked as a Microsoft intern and everyone got Surface tablets, xbox with kinetic, etc for free. I sold my brand new xbox sealed and I had no receipt. Ask anyone in the tech field. I'm insanely jealous of the things my friends at Google get. I'm sure working/interning at apple would be similar.

    Returning gifts varies by person. I know I wouldn't have the courage to ask for a receipt for a gift I didn't like. In my culture, that's a sign of ungratefulness and considered disrespectful. Sometimes it's easier and more socially acceptable to sell it if I already owned the gift.

    These are coming from my personal experience. You haven't shown me anything that actually did happen but rather what you assume might happen, akin to negative worrying. That's why I said your post is too presumptuous. Now that being said, I'm not discounting the fact that OP's sellers macbook might be stolen. It's just that we cannot prove that it is and therefore jump to the conclusion that it's stolen and sellers = bad.
     
  20. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #20
    I was unaware of that, but have any of those gifts ever made it near the price level of a maxed out macbook pro? This part may be presumptuous, but both in the case of a gift from a relative or a corporation, a highly configured model seems unlikely. That doesn't mean it couldn't happen, but again I would be cautious as a buyer with anything unlikely.

    I don't care for returning gifts either, and I have received some strange ones. I just find it a bit wasteful with something that costs that much. My one assumption on the gift end was that someone who gives a gift in that price range knows you fairly well.

    I don't care for anecdotes as they aren't very meaningful, and I wasn't suggesting that it is stolen. I was suggesting that a buyer should be careful and that I would avoid anything that just "might" be stolen due to the potential negatives outweighing the positives.
     
  21. willydimes macrumors regular

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    Jun 8, 2014
    #21
    Also be careful about the Applecare because he could sell it to you with applecare to then return it a few days after the purchase, get his money back and you're stuck paying 250 bucks to get applecare again

    Im spit balling here and only because I know this happened to someone but confirm date of purchase and of applecare and make sure when you buy it that it would be outside the return window for applecare Then again you can always return it and get a prorated refund so either way its a risky move. Nonetheless the price even without apple care is a pretty decent deal
     
  22. Orr macrumors 6502

    Orr

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    Oct 8, 2013
    #22
    Yes. Sheer stupidity isn't a defense.

    That deal is far too good to be true from a stranger.
     

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