Is this genuine

shakey55

macrumors member
Original poster
Apr 26, 2014
54
0
I recently received an email (see picture)

I have not clicked on links.

Is this genuine

 

Zenithal

macrumors G3
Sep 10, 2009
8,992
10,081
I don't have this model, but is this about actual data loss or the coil whine issue?
 

Lioness~

macrumors 65816
Apr 26, 2017
1,187
1,103
Always check what email it comes from. From there you can determine validity of emails.
If you’re enough perceptive and cautious.

Don’t ever click links, unless you’re 100% safe and sure of the validity of sender.
Apple have apple.com or xxx@xxx.apple.com Never anything strange.
If you still are unsure, check with Apple direct as already stated in thread.
 
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jtara

macrumors 68000
Mar 23, 2009
1,826
432
Return email address are absolutely meaningless. You can put anything you want there.

You cannot ascertain that a message is genuine by looking at the return email address.

There are advanced schemes using DNS records (SPF, DKIM, DMARC) that allow senders to authenticate the source of messages from their domain. They can help automated tools to alert you to potential fraudulent emails.

SPF - Sender asserts (via a published DNS record) which servers their mail might be sent from. If mail is sent by a different server, it should be considered fraudulent.

DKIM - Sender email server signs specific email headers using a private key, and publishes the public key in a DNS record. If the decrypted data doesn't match the headers, the email should be considered fraudulent.

DMARC - Sender states a policy (via a published DNS record) advising receiving servers the wishes of the sender should the receiver receive email that doesn't pass SPF or DKIM tests. (forward, drop, bounce).

This is all at the domain level, not individual email address. And it is not easy for a human to use any of this to verify the sender. It does enable filtering services and software to reject mail with domain forgeries.

A good ISP/email provider should have their own internal controls to insure that the sender's return address is legitimate, but you should not count on that, and I doubt compliance is even as high as 50%.
 
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