It's Electric!

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by enderg, May 25, 2015.

  1. enderg macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2015
    #1
    I've noticed a huge increase in static electricity discharges since taking delivery of my Apple Watch. Could the Flouroelastometer band have something to do with this phenomenon?
     
  2. Skorpio macrumors 6502

    Skorpio

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2015
    Location:
    SC USA
    #2
    Interesting. 6 days, no Electric Boogaloo for me. 42mm, GSB.
     
  3. apunkrockmonk macrumors 6502a

    apunkrockmonk

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    #3
    I've had mine for 3 weeks or so, long enough for me to crack the glass, but I've yet to produce any static shocks in that time period.
     
  4. greenglue macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2010
    Location:
    QC, Canada
    #4
    Rubber (and Flouroelastometer too) acts as an insulator for electricity. Ceramic as well. But if the metal is touching you directly from the Watch and there is a lose ground in either your watch or your home, you touching things could create enough potential difference for a tiny shock.

    As a test, to see if it is Apple Watch or not, put a pice of paper, maybe a business card, under the watch. Heart rate monitor won't work btu see if that fixes the problem, if it does then you know it's the watch.
     
  5. Lennyvalentin macrumors 6502a

    Lennyvalentin

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2011
    #5
    Confirmation bias. There's no such connection as you describe.

    Watches have had synthetic bands for decades without shocking people, and the biggest reason for this is because it can't happen. To build up a static potential you must transfer charge to or from another separate object, which obviously can't be in direct contact with your own arm, as then it wouldn't actually transfer anywhere. :)

    You're being shocked because of something else; soles of your shoes or socks rubbing on carpet, or something like that.
     
  6. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #6
    Are you down under? Not much static this time of year in the northern hemisphere.
     
  7. enderg, May 26, 2015
    Last edited: May 26, 2015

    enderg thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2015
    #7
    That's one of the most perplexing things. I live in South Florida and static electricity is just not normal at all due to the humidity. But I'm not making it up. Since I got the watch I get a static discharge every time I get out of my car. And even at my job, I get shocked constantly. And yes, I know I doesn't make any sense. Weird right?
     
  8. baller1308 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    #8
    Probably the fluxcapacitor.:eek:
     
  9. TheAppleFairy macrumors 68020

    TheAppleFairy

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2013
    Location:
    The Clinton Archipelago unfortunately
    #9
    You walking around your house in socks staring on your wrist? You're probably dragging your feet.
     
  10. ChinaRye macrumors 6502

    ChinaRye

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #10
    I haven't noticed this, but DC has been oppressively humid recently.
     

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