iTunes Match - why would Apple give you their files?

Discussion in 'Apple Music, Apple Pay, iCloud, Apple Services' started by Razeus, Dec 5, 2011.

  1. Razeus macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    #1
    So, I just finished downloading 18k tracks from iTunes as they were all matched with the iTunes store. After all is said and done, I have to wonder why would Apple give out their versions of the file (I'm assume they are superior to the tracks I had)? Sure it's nice to have all my 96-192k files replaced with their 256k versions (in which I can hear the difference between 128k and 256k), but I have to wonder what's in it for Apple?
     
  2. adamtheturtle macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2011
    #2
    It is a great service that will make you buy an iPhone!

    Also, they don't have to have hard drives full of your 92kbps version and my 97kbps version.
     
  3. HazyCloud macrumors 68030

    HazyCloud

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2010
    #3
    24.99 a person is what's in it for Apple. This could be just me, but Match has also made me purchase more music from iTunes just to add more to my library without the hassle of it being matched.
     
  4. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #4
    Most of the $25 goes to the record companies. Music Match (and iCloud) are like crack samples. The REAL reason is Apple is looking to hook you in the Apple ecosystem and continue to buy Apple hardware in the future.
     
  5. WisdomWolf macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2010
    #5
    And it would have been a good plan. I was considering switching to an iPhone for the promise of easy anywhere access to all my music. Unfortunately match is horribly and terribly broken on iOS devices in it's current form. At least that's been my experience with my iPad. :(
     
  6. locust76 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2009
    #6
    Because:

    a) You're paying them for cloud space
    b) Music libraries are huge and take up a lot of said space
    c) They probably have many of your songs already ripped and ready to go in the iTunes store, thus saving tons of their own disk space.
     
  7. Bernard SG macrumors 65816

    Bernard SG

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
  8. PNutts macrumors 601

    PNutts

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest, US
    #8
    Once you match and download your songs you may discontinue the service and keep them. And at any time you may use Google's free music service which is compatible with iDevices. So my personal opinion is that iTunes Match isn't a big plus compared to the rest of Apple's ecosystem.
     
  9. martinmartin macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    #9
    Did you manually click on each file to download it? The only way I've found to download matched music is to delete the original file, then click the cloud icon to download. Takes about 5 clicks per song.

    Curious if you used some shortcut to the above.
     
  10. Razeus thread starter macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    #10
    No I just highlighted my library and click the download button.
     
  11. rwwest7 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2011
    #11
    You can just delete the entire album, then re-download the entire album. About two clicks per album (plus a couple Enters)
     
  12. repete7 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    #12
    Why not select all the tracks you want to replace, delete, select them all again, right click, and choose download from the contextual menu? That's what I did. Why do it track by track or album by album? Seems like a lot of extra work.
     
  13. milo macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    #13
    Exactly. And to make it even easier you can make a smart playlist for Matched and bitrate under 256. Just delete all the files in that playlist with one click and then download them all.
     
  14. cubfan06 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2011
    Location:
    Bourbonnais, IL
    #14
    I disagree. The files you download from Apple are DRM free. Therefore it doesn't tie you into the ecosystem at all...
     
  15. roebeet, Dec 8, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2011

    roebeet macrumors newbie

    roebeet

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    #15
    The paranoid conspiracy part of me almost makes me believe that this is not accidental. :eek: I've had more than a handful of albums where only one song is not matched - completely random, from what I can tell.

    I actually beieve that they do want to keep you in the ecosystem. Not on the OS side since they do support Windows users, but on the mobile side. No Android version, for example, means that you'd need an iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad to make the best use of the mobile capabilities of iTunes Match.


    As for the OP's original question, that one I can't answer. Why didn't they just do what Amazon and Google are doing, which is just allowing files to be uploaded as is? Or match with a better version, but NOT allow it to be downloaded? Maybe they felt that there are a significant number of people with older 128kps files of the CD rips, their legit eMusic files or that "questionable" stuff and that the Match / download offering would snatch a large number of these people from Amazon and Google.
     
  16. milo macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    #16
    True but they're in AAC and live in iTunes and support iOS but not Android, which is more friendly to Apple hardware.
     
  17. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #17
    It's a hook and not a vault. Hooks do a good job of keeping the vast majority in place.;)
     
  18. roebeet macrumors newbie

    roebeet

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    #18
    I see your point, but cubfan06's point was that, in essence, the downloaded Match files are DRM-free AAC's and can be used on any device / OS that supports the AAC format. But this assumes that the user downloads the songs and doesn't use iCloud itself, of course - if you want to use iCloud on a portable device, only Apple devices are supported.

    AAC's themselves are supported on many non-Apple devices and software - Amazon Cloud Services, Cowon devices, even MS's Zune support the format. I actually fought against the format for a very long time as MP3's were more ubiquitous, but I've come to the point where AAC support is such that it's probably worth using, at least for me.


    Exactly! You nailed it.
     

Share This Page