Jailbreak... Unlocking... WHY???

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by kashmoney2006, Dec 13, 2007.

  1. kashmoney2006 macrumors regular

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    Dec 12, 2007
    #1
    I think that i understand that in order to use a phone on another wireless provider (ex T-Mobile) one must use jailbreak to sim unlock the iphone. That I can see as a practical purpose. Aside from that, Why would somebody risk the warranty void and jailbreak their iphone? what kind of features do you gain? Also, why does one have to jailbreak the iphone to gain access to these features?
     
  2. aridon macrumors member

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    Dec 10, 2007
    #2
    Crap load of semi cool programs. Ability to customize the phone how the user wants. Ability to add features that should already be available.

    Warranty issue? Reflash back to the current version, takes about 10 minutes, in the unlikely event you have to return the phone.
     
  3. ert3 macrumors 6502a

    ert3

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    Dec 10, 2007
    #3
    Also it would seem that the more firmware we crack the more apple is forced to send updates. with how quickly 1.1.2 was realeased and considering the fact they cramed features into it unlike sony which just releases updates to psp owners that only contain new security revisions.
     
  4. meagain macrumors 68030

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    #4
    Because it's like getting a new phone to play with with every app you load.
     
  5. megfilmworks macrumors 68020

    megfilmworks

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    #5
    Don't forget that cool pseudo GPS app that is accurate enough to tell you what Galaxy you live in.
     
  6. goosnarrggh macrumors 68000

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    May 16, 2006
    #6
    One might be inclined to jailbreak because, at least for the moment, there is no officially sanctioned technique for installing any additional native programs (eg games, utilities, etc, but not including Javascript-based Web Apps run inside Safari) on your iPhone beyond the suite of programs that comes from the factory.

    Given that the iPhone does seem to be running a full-fledged operating system, there exists an enthusiastic minority of people who really want to try and find out just what sort of programs they can write to run on the iPhone. For this culture of people, asking the question "Why do you write your own programs for every GameBoy, programmable calculator, or wireless router you see?", is like asking a mountain climber why she climbs mountains: "Because it's there. Because I enjoy the challenge." There's also a community of people who are interested in making use of the fruits of these experiments to create practical applications.

    A jailbroken iPhone (which has not been SIM unlocked) typically still has its baseband and bootloader firmware fully intact, so a standard iTunes Restore process has so far been all it takes to bring such a phone back to an apparently warranty-compliant state.
     
  7. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #7
    What, you never put another program on your Mac after you got it? It looked and did everything you wanted, just the way it came?

    :)

    As for warranty, it's a shame that you think the phone is so poorly made that you have to worry about such a thing. I certainly didn't worry on my other smartphones when I upgraded their ROMs or mod'd them... they were pretty solid devices.

    For that matter, I wish people would stop repeating the BS that it voids the warranty. The warranty is for hardware only. Apple does not even warrant its own software or updates. What you do do, is bust the software license, which is a different thing.

    However, the upshot is that Apple has decided they won't honor their hardware warranty if they think you mod'd your phone.
     
  8. kashmoney2006 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Dec 12, 2007
    #8

    Of course i use 3rd party programs to make my computer do what i want it to. But my big question is why should i have to risk a void of warranty to do this on the iphone? Why should i have to jailbreak my phone to do this? I never had to do anything like that to my MBP. Why does apple not allow 3rd party software on the iphone?
     
  9. aanndrew macrumors member

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    Dec 14, 2007
    #9
    i think its amazingly stupid we have to jailbreak a mobile we payed ALOT of money for just to have such basic apps
    god i hate it when they can have the best devise for years to come if they just give us what we want.
    giz the iphone peeps more choice in what they want :.
     
  10. ZipZap macrumors 601

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    Dec 14, 2007
    #10
    What happens if you cannot virginize the phone?

    Could Apple refuse service and perhaps even keep the phone for violations of their Software License?

    Apple wipes the phone, as I understand it, for any service and loads the current revision. So we may reach a point where the phone comes back to you and is no longer hackable?

    Finally, I have heard of people who were unable to virginize the phone once hacked....any turth to this?
     
  11. ZipZap macrumors 601

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    Dec 14, 2007
    #11
    Also, another reason for jailbreaking the phone (not unlock), as I have read on other forums, it to keep current service without another 2 year commit.

    Business customers, I suspect, might benefit greatly from this as their existing plans can be heavily discounted.
     
  12. question fear macrumors 68020

    question fear

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    #12
    It'll be really helpful once AT&T gets those towers out towards Pluto like they keep promising...I always lose signal right around Neptune, and then I am all types of screwed trying to find my way back....
     
  13. psychofreak Retired

    psychofreak

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    May 16, 2006
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    London
    #13
    For many people (including myself, in multiple places) it has been fairly accurate, within a maximum of two streets...
     
  14. emotion macrumors 68040

    emotion

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    #14
    Where have you been? Apple announced plans to open up to 3rd party apps a while back.

    Leopard has signing and app sandboxing (essential for security), I suspect that will come to mobile OSX in time for the SDK release.
     
  15. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #15
    Well, you would think so, since every other smartphone OS has had that capability for years.

    It's pretty clear that Apple didn't plan much ahead in this case. They never felt the need to come up with a comprehensive plan since they didn't expect to let people write native apps for it. Now they're no doubt rewriting a lot of the code to not run as root, add sandboxing, etc. And figuring out the best distribution method that includes them in the profit side where possible.

    All fully understandable in today's rush-rush market, but slightly disappointing.
     
  16. hexonxonx macrumors 601

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    Jul 4, 2007
    Location:
    Denver Colorado
    #16
    I've been asked to unlock an iPhone by someone I work with who is moving back to his homeland in Bulgaria. He bought the iPhone and I have it sitting here waiting for me to unlock it in the morning. Not many people will have an iPhone where he is going and he is very excited about it. He's like a little kid at Christmas, he is that excited! Because of that, I am happy to help him.

    I see nothing wrong with this at all.
     
  17. kashmoney2006 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Dec 12, 2007
    #17

    who said anything about it being "wrong"???
     
  18. emotion macrumors 68040

    emotion

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    #18
    I think Apple had a plan all along. It takes a long time to get OSs to market (as an example, Vista took 5 years!), getting Leopard and the iPhone OS out the door was a lot to ask of them.

    Not that that helps the buyer of Apple products but I'm patient, I know even a rough 'round the edges Apple product is ok to use, and when the next big update comes I'm sure quite a few of the niggles will be sorted out.
     
  19. ZipZap macrumors 601

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    Dec 14, 2007
    #19
    Apple's plan was totally 1980's thinking, and frankly it baffles me.

    How can a company that prides itself on innovation, be so far from the mark in so many respects?

    My guess is that they have again foundationed their approach on the proprietary thinking that has killed so many devices.

    I am sure that they believe that because of their success with iPods they could use the same approach with a cell phone. Unfortunately, cell phones are not a new concept but fairly mature as a technology. As such, the public already has a minimum expectation for these devices. Hence all the bitching and moaning online.

    Apple did 2 things exceptionally well....the interface.......the ipod.....almost every other software feature or facet of hardware falls short in some respect.

    From my perspective....as an iPod the iphone in a innovation marvel.....but as a cell phone they have missed the mark and missed it in a big way.

    Now we are all in the "lets wait for fixes and new features" mode....suddenly it feels like Microsoft in here.
     
  20. emotion macrumors 68040

    emotion

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    #20
    I actually think that with the degree of a leap forward in mobile communicators (ok, it's a phone too but that's not it's strength) Apple had no chance of getting this right first time.

    With that in mind I think they've done an amazing job. I'd say you have to own one for a while to appreciate that though.

    Remember the iPhone is the most used mobile platform already according to stats from webservers published recently. ie it's already overtaken windows mobile platforms.

    http://marketshare.hitslink.com/rep...ame=M&qpsp=106&qpmr=14&qpdt=1&qpct=0&sample=4

    Wait until Feb for firmware 2.x. I'd be surprised if there wasn't a big positive change in the function of the device.

    btw. I think as an iPod the iPhone is a slight step back. The lack of physical controls limits it slightly. Still very capable, but not as good at my Nano2, say.
     
  21. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #21
    Hmm. What do you think was the leap forward?

    With the exception of the first really nice browser, I see the iPhone more of a leap sideways. Nothing earthshatteringly new, just a different and simpler consumer UI. (Simpler touchscreen UIs have been around for years in custom enterprise apps.)

    The real breakthrough devices, coming soon, know where you are, and what time of day it is, and learn what you like to do each day.

    For instance, they know you're in a meeting room or theatre and turn off the ringer. They know it's lunchtime and you're going outside, therefore they present menus/deals at your favorite restaurants. They let you see your contacts and friends on a map. Etc. So much cooler stuff than I can even think of right now.

    Drat... gotta run.
     
  22. question fear macrumors 68020

    question fear

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    #22
    True. Those devices are going to really change how we interact with mobile devices. Nokia is a good company to look to in terms of pushing the envelope...many of their acquisitions lately have been in the area of "location based services".
     
  23. rogersmj macrumors 68020

    rogersmj

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    Sep 10, 2006
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    #23
    For the billionth time,

    JAILBREAKING THE IPHONE DOES NOT VOID THE WARRANTY.

    All you have to do to get it back to a Apple-serviceable state is run a restore in iTunes, and they'll never know that it was jailbroken. SIM unlocking they can detect, however.

    Given some of the instability I've experienced since installing some third-party apps on my iPhone, I can understand where Apple's coming from when they say they want to make sure they have a proper environment developed before they allow apps on the iPhone. Still, for me, since it is a relatively safe procedure at this point and does NOT void the warranty, I was willing to do it so I could get instant messaging, ssh terminal, and a few other things.
     
  24. emotion macrumors 68040

    emotion

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    Manchester, UK
    #24
    How long have you owned yours?

    I'd say the leap forward is the integration with all my other digital information (calendar, internet, music, photo, video) and then have real easy access to that via a nice, simple, usable interface.

    Miles better than all my pdas/phones/iPods i've had before. That's the leapforward.

    I'm not saying this is the final form of this kind of device (it's very rough around the edges, software wise and hardware could be more up to date) but this is a very interesting device and more than the sum of it's parts.

    ...know time of day...like a watch? :)

    I know what your saying and I kind of agree with you but this is a possible first step in that direction. Android might be the step beyond that we'll have to see. iPhone has raised the game for phones whichever way you look at it.


    Back to the point...I'm finally gonna jailbreak for this:

    http://thrill.artificialeyes.tv/

    Ableton Live is the main reason I have this laptop.
     

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