Jailbreaking Exemption Law Could Expire Soon

Applejuiced

macrumors Westmere
Apr 16, 2008
40,672
6,532
At the iPhone hacks section.
Doesn't matter if a law is enacted or not. If you own the phone, you can do with it as you please, including destroying it.
True, but if JB becomes illegal Apple can go after The Dev Team or any hacker that works, creates or distributes JB software.
Kinda like Sony went after Geohot and tried to sue him for millions of dollars in damages and requested all his computers and hard drives etc...
Its kinda hard to hack and release JB tools when you have big court cases and huge lawyers fee's to worry about.
 

Mac.World

macrumors 68000
Jan 9, 2011
1,819
1
In front of uranus
True, but if JB becomes illegal Apple can go after The Dev Team or any hacker that works, creates or distributes JB software.
Kinda like Sony went after Geohot and tried to sue him for millions of dollars in damages and requested all his computers and hard drives etc...
Its kinda hard to hack and release JB tools when you have big court cases and huge lawyers fee's to worry about.
Won't effect anyone outside the US, even if it did pass. So all of our dev team members in France, Germany, UK, etc... Can do as they please, including host the servers there. And this won't stop any of the hackers in the US from working on the code.

That should be a last ditch option mind you, as this law is ridiculous and should be snuffed out.
 

jesuispizza

macrumors regular
Apr 11, 2011
100
0
Won't effect anyone outside the US, even if it did pass. So all of our dev team members in France, Germany, UK, etc... Can do as they please, including host the servers there. And this won't stop any of the hackers in the US from working on the code.

That should be a last ditch option mind you, as this law is ridiculous and should be snuffed out.
Oh ya? Tell that to the guys who ran megaupload.com
 

Mac.World

macrumors 68000
Jan 9, 2011
1,819
1
In front of uranus
Oh ya? Tell that to the guys who ran megaupload.com
Servers were in the US. And jailbreaking a phone does not equate to piracy, as in megauploads case. Additionally, I don't believe in of the dev or chronic team are known felons, as in the case of Erik dotcom.

Comparing jailbreaking to megaupload is a bit of a stretch.
 

labman

macrumors 604
Jun 9, 2009
7,786
1
Mich near Detroit
I agree with on some points but I still think it.s better if things are kept the way it is now. However also for others keep in mind that the law was in place when Sony went after Geohot. I still think it's better to have some laws protecting the right to jailbreak then none. I know I signed it because of that simple reason.
 

thewitt

macrumors 68020
Sep 13, 2011
2,102
1,523
Won't effect anyone outside the US, even if it did pass. So all of our dev team members in France, Germany, UK, etc... Can do as they please, including host the servers there. And this won't stop any of the hackers in the US from working on the code.

That should be a last ditch option mind you, as this law is ridiculous and should be snuffed out.
Don't kid yourself. US law impacts people in other countries all the time. Ask
Richard O'Dwyer if TVShack was a good idea and if the US anti piracy laws caused him any grief...
 

4sFanatic

macrumors regular
Jan 26, 2012
172
0
Don't kid yourself. US law impacts people in other countries all the time. Ask
Richard O'Dwyer if TVShack was a good idea and if the US anti piracy laws caused him any grief...

I STILL watch free PPV MMA on my pc every weekend and no one tries harder to protect his stuff than Dana White.
 

heisenberg123

macrumors 603
Oct 31, 2010
6,497
9
Hamilton, Ontario
I STILL watch free PPV MMA on my pc every weekend and no one tries harder to protect his stuff than Dana White.
MLB and UEFA protect their stuff even more than Dana White

atleast Dana White's product is PPV, the other 2 sports are broadcasted for free in their local areas but try and get a stream of one online is a challange

back to the jailbreaking point, this is total BS apple has every right to use their systems and servers to try and flag jailbroken devices to ban them from the app store or itunes or what have you, but to go after developers is a bit much.

when someone commits a "crime" you go after the offender not the peolpe who manufacture the "thing" used to committ that crime


that would be like going after Beretta everytime someone was shot, or Benchmade everytime someone was stabbed

oh wait lets go after Sony everytime a lowlife makes child p0rn on his handycam
 
Last edited:

macbookman83

macrumors 6502
Jan 23, 2011
420
0
New York
It's funny how we can go out against "pirates" and media giants but will NEVER go after corporate cheats and crooks that steals billions of dollars from people worldwide.
 

Applejuiced

macrumors Westmere
Apr 16, 2008
40,672
6,532
At the iPhone hacks section.
I agree with on some points but I still think it.s better if things are kept the way it is now. However also for others keep in mind that the law was in place when Sony went after Geohot. I still think it's better to have some laws protecting the right to jailbreak then none. I know I signed it because of that simple reason.
I hear you.
Its always a good thing for that exemption law to be around.
You never know what strings some of these multi-billion dollar companies can pull.
They have lots of money and power that can reach anywhere in the world.
I co-signed it also. :)
 
Last edited:

swiftbmx

macrumors 6502
Aug 23, 2009
261
156
MLB and UEFA protect their stuff even more than Dana White

atleast Dana White's product is PPV, the other 2 sports are broadcasted for free in their local areas but try and get a stream of one online is a challange

back to the jailbreaking point, this is total BS apple has every right to use their systems and servers to try and flag jailbroken devices to ban them from the app store or itunes or what have you, but to go after developers is a bit much.

when someone commits a "crime" you go after the offender not the peolpe who manufacture the "thing" used to committ that crime


that would be like going after Beretta everytime someone was shot, or Benchmade everytime someone was stabbed

oh wait lets go after Sony everytime a lowlife makes child p0rn on his handycam
I agree to an extent but remove the "dealer" and the crime doesn't exist, i.e. illegal narcotics.
 

Rodimus Prime

macrumors G4
Oct 9, 2006
10,136
4
Jailbreaking is not a crime - Exception set to expire

https://www.eff.org/pages/jailbreaking-not-crime-tell-copyright-office-free-your-devices
The exception given in 2010 is set to expire this year unless it is renewed. Figure I would post this hear to help get some word out and for more people to raise hell about it so it continues not to be a crime.
We all know that companies like Apple, other manufactures, and carriers would love to have it be made a crime to lock it down.

So I say raise hell write congressman and senators to prevent it from changing.
 

ghall

macrumors 68040
Jun 27, 2006
3,771
1
Rhode Island
Honestly, how is this even an issue? Do the people who distribute the Jailbreak software distribute any of Apple's code? I'm not sure about other devices, but I'm fairly certain that's not the case with iOS jailbreak tools.

That being the case, it boggles the mind that this is even a copyright issue.

Am I just totally missing something?
 

Rodimus Prime

macrumors G4
Oct 9, 2006
10,136
4
Honestly, how is this even an issue? Do the people who distribute the Jailbreak software distribute any of Apple's code? I'm not sure about other devices, but I'm fairly certain that's not the case with iOS jailbreak tools.

That being the case, it boggles the mind that this is even a copyright issue.

Am I just totally missing something?
But what a company like Apple will try to do is make it in the EUL that you can not modify the software (aka jailbreak). Right now Apple can not do that.
Apple I could see the one leading the charge to shut down jailbreakers and rooters. Apple would be the one going after the group the most aggressively followed by the Carriers.
 

ghall

macrumors 68040
Jun 27, 2006
3,771
1
Rhode Island
But what a company like Apple will try to do is make it in the EUL that you can not modify the software (aka jailbreak). Right now Apple can not do that.
Apple I could see the one leading the charge to shut down jailbreakers and rooters. Apple would be the one going after the group the most aggressively followed by the Carriers.
I can understand why Apple and the carriers don't want people screwing with the software. And while I don't think it's outside of their right to make the software technically harder to crack, I think the case that it should be illegal to do so is going right over my head.

Ok so I bought my iPhone (yes, the phone is subsidized, but you pay for that over time over the course of your contract), why should it be illegal for me, or anyone else, to tweak their phone? Apple, of course, would not be obligated to service a phone if they found evidence of tampering. But as far as legality goes, it's my phone, if I'm not stealing software, then why shouldn't I be able to modify it.

I realize that I'm probably preaching to the choir, I'm just trying to figure out what the rationale behind the fact that this type of tweaking would fall under copyright law, or any law for that matter. I mean, if I hack my toaster oven, the copyright police aren't going to come crashing through the door. (The EMT would probably be taking care of that, as I have no idea how to safely meddle with a toaster, but thats an entirely different issue all together. :p)
 

jesuispizza

macrumors regular
Apr 11, 2011
100
0
Servers were in the US. And jailbreaking a phone does not equate to piracy, as in megauploads case. Additionally, I don't believe in of the dev or chronic team are known felons, as in the case of Erik dotcom.

Comparing jailbreaking to megaupload is a bit of a stretch.
I agree it's apples to oranges, I was simply making a point based on the fact that the people who ran it were from outside of the US, and they're trying to extradite them to the US.
 

danahn17

macrumors 6502
Dec 3, 2009
384
0
I hope it gets renewed...

In my opinion though, Id think it's in Apples best interest to allow Jail breaking. I mean, haven't they hired some of the jail breakers?
 

quagmire

macrumors 603
Apr 19, 2004
6,377
1,301
Doesn't matter if a law is enacted or not. If you own the phone, you can do with it as you please, including destroying it.
You own the hardware, but jail breaking is software related in which you don't own, but only pay for a license to use it.
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
66,686
33,574
Boston
People were jail breaking their phones before this law, and if it expires they'll be doing the same afterwards. I see this not affecting those want to jail break one iota.
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
But what a company like Apple will try to do is make it in the EUL that you can not modify the software (aka jailbreak).
That's already in the Software License Agreement:

"You may not and you agree not to, or to enable others to, copy (except as expressly permitted by this License), decompile, reverse engineer, disassemble, attempt to derive the source code of, decrypt, modify, or create derivative works of the iOS Software or any services provided by the iOS Software, or any part thereof (except as and only to the extent any foregoing restriction is prohibited by applicable law or to the extent as may be permitted by licensing terms governing use of open-sourced components included with the iOS Software). Any attempt to do so is a violation of the rights of Apple and its licensors of the iOS Software." - iPhone 4S SLA
I hope it gets renewed...

In my opinion though, Id think it's in Apples best interest to allow Jail breaking. I mean, haven't they hired some of the jail breakers?
When jailbreaking first started, Steve Jobs virtually bragged about it, because it meant that people were taking a big interest in the iPhone. It was sort of a "wink wink" - we prohibit it but it's cool kind of thing.

Then the first earnings call hit where Apple admitted that (IIRC) something like 20% of the phones sold were being unlocked to use on carriers other than ATT. (That's unlocked... far more were being just jailbroken.)

Remember, there was no subsidy the first year... Apple sold the iPhone for less but made it up with monthly royalties from ATT. No royalties = less profit.

Futhermore, about that time Jobs was being talked into allowing third party apps the next year. Jailbroken phones didn't rely on his iTunes walled garden.

It seemed like after that earnings call, Apple really bent over backwards to stop jailbreaks. Their revenue was at stake and the word was out. Jailbreaking was no longer seen as cool by Apple.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.