JBOD enclosure

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by stanw, Oct 2, 2016.

  1. stanw macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2007
    #1
    I want to get an enclosure to put either 2 or 4 hard drives inside to be used as JBOD. I was considering either a 4 drive from OWC ThunderBay IV or a G Tech 2 drive one.

    I might want to use these drives depending on if I get a 2 or 4 bay:
    - 6TB for photos and videos for Lightroom
    - maybe a separate drive for editing video
    - maybe a separate drive for documents
    - maybe a separate drive for music

    1. Anyone have any thoughts about either of these?
    2. If I want to unmount a drive that is in the enclosure, how do you remount it?
    3. Do you nee to keep drives in it all the time for it to work properly? Do I need to keep 4 drives in the 4 drive one and not 2 or 3?
    4. Do all of the drives need to be the same type/storage capacity?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Taz Mangus macrumors 68040

    Taz Mangus

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2011
    #2
    For JBOD if ejected a disk you can remount it from DiskUtility. You should be able to put different size hard drives in the different slots as each hard drive will act as independent hard drives. You should also be able to remove hard drives without affecting the other hard drives.

    I am currently using the OWC Thunderbolt enclosure for (2) Raid 1 configurations. I have not used it in the JBOD configuration. The downside to using a multi-disk enclosure is that it needs a fan and that adds extra noise to the environment.
     
  3. shaunp macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2010
    #3
    Startech also make good JBOD enclosures, both 2 bay (2.5") and 3 bay (3.5")
     
  4. roadkill401 macrumors 6502

    roadkill401

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2015
    #4
    There are some considerations for you. As a JBOD, you gain only in appearance of drive space. ie you can have a bunch of small drives that appear as one big one. But loose out in if any of the drives in the bunch fail, then you lose the data on all the drives (well, can recover with tools).

    Going with direct storage, you gain in speed. But to take advantage of that you need to have a fast drive. So unless you are putting in SSD's into the attached storage, your gain isn't really that large over something like a NAS.

    I have both. I use a 3tb Lacie as a scratch disk and my downloads folder. I have a multi drive TB case that I have my Windows10 Bootcamp loaded onto (SSD) and a few other laptop spinner hard drives that I use for backup (CCC).

    All my music, movies and media along with offline home is sitting on a large NAS. I don't need speed for them, but wanted a large amount of storage and some fault tolerance on the storage.

    Buy the tools that need the need.
     
  5. cvdave macrumors newbie

    cvdave

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2016
    #5
    This is incorrect... JBOD .. JUST A BUNCH OF DISKS and each one appears as its own identity, and 100% independent of all other drives. It requires some level of RAID (Random Array of Independent Drives) to "combine" them together.
    And in a RAID (depending on which level you install).... failure of one (somethimes even two drives) DOES NOT affect the ability to recover the data (in JBOD, if one drive fails you lose the data on that ONE drive).
     
  6. danielwsmithee macrumors 65816

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    Mar 12, 2005
    #6
  7. stanw thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2007
    #7
    When using an enclosure as JBOD
    1. Can I put drives into it that already have data or do you need to start with drives without any files on them?
    2. Can I use drives of different storage amounts? Example: one 4TB and one 6TB?
    3. Do they typically involve just putting the drives in and plugging it in, or is there some type of configuration needed to make the Mac recognize them?

    Thanks.
     
  8. hfg macrumors 68040

    hfg

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2006
    Location:
    Cedar Rapids, IA. USA
    #8
    Yes, yes, and yes (new drives need formatting)
     
  9. cvdave macrumors newbie

    cvdave

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2016
    #9
    1. Yes you can
    2. Yes, UNLESS the enclosure specifically says you cannot (Note: this is for JBOD, a RAID usually requires identical)
    3. Usually plug and play
     
  10. danielwsmithee macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    #10
    They appear just like any internally attached SATA drive. If they are already formatted it will mount them, if not they will need to be mounted.

    Any RAID, JBOD etc happens via software by the OS.
     
  11. cvdave macrumors newbie

    cvdave

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    Oct 2, 2016
    #11
    There is nothing special to support JBOD, and RAID can be software OR Hardware
     
  12. monokakata macrumors 68000

    monokakata

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Location:
    Hilo, Hawai'i
    #12
    When I took my Mac Pro 5,1 out of service, I got an OWC Thunderbay IV to connect to an iMac 27 retina. I put the 3 drives that had been in the Mac Pro (one a SSD), added another one, and that was that. No fuss, no tinkering, no nothing. The 4 drives appear in Finder and I work with them just as I did when they were in the Mac Pro.

    It hasn't been completely trouble-free, though. No data lost, nothing like that. But I get unexpected dismounts/ejections sometimes when I plug a USB 3 device into the iMac, and sometimes for no reason at all that I can understand. And sometimes I get the system message for unexpected disconnect . . . but the drives remain connected, visible on the desktop, and accessible. And finally, I sometimes get unexpected dismounts and then Disk Utility cannot see the OWC even after I power cycle it, unplug the TB cable, etc. I have to reboot the iMac to get everything back.

    I get these annoyances at most once every 10 days or 2 weeks, so I'm not too upset by them. I would like to know the cause(s), though.
     
  13. FireWire2 macrumors 6502

    FireWire2

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    #13
    I would look at the 4bay trayless JBOD from DATOptic
    http://www.datoptic.com/ec/quad-4-sataiii-to-usb3-0-support-uasp-for-mac-windwows-linux.html
    You can hot plug the any drive at any time - just eject it and hot insert it back when ever you need it
    It does not matter what size of HDD it can be 200GB to 10TB because it has 48 bit LBA per bay
     
  14. danielwsmithee, Oct 3, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2016

    danielwsmithee macrumors 65816

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    Mar 12, 2005
    #14
    JBOD or Just a Bunch of Disks is creating a single logical volume that spans multiple disks. Essentially creating one large disk with no redundancy or performance improvements out of multiple drives. Almost every OS supports it, but it is a software feature.

    The OP asked about JBOD enclosures so the assumption was that he wasn't interested in a HW based raid enclosure. With those simpler enclosures SW raid is the only option for raid.

    Mac OS out of the box supports JBOD, Raid1, Raid0, Raid10 and CoreStorage (Fusion) volumes. To get Raid5 or 6 etc requires a software add on package like SoftRaid in these types of enclosures.
    --- Post Merged, Oct 3, 2016 ---
    You are confused regarding the term JBOD, it is used to describe spanned volumes instead of raid volumes. Disks that are "bunched" together. When you use the appleRaid command to create the volume passing the option JBOD specifies a spanned volume.
     
  15. FireWire2 macrumors 6502

    FireWire2

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    Oct 12, 2008
    #15
    Base on what you're saying, what would you call when plug in a PM box and four or five INDIVIDUAL drives show up on your mac?

    How is it that a combination of drives, where we call SPAN/BIG/Concatenation, now is JBOD?!
     
  16. danielwsmithee, Oct 4, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2016

    danielwsmithee macrumors 65816

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    Mar 12, 2005
    #16
    I'm not saying the whole thing does not lead to massive confusion. Just saying the term JBOD is used, at least by Apple, to refer to Span/Concatenation.

    If you have a few drives internally mounted in your machine do you say you have JBOD? If not there, why here?
     
  17. matreya macrumors 65816

    matreya

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    Nov 14, 2009
    #17
    From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-RAID_drive_architectures
    • JBOD (derived from "just a bunch of disks"): an architecture involving multiple hard disk drives, while making them accessible either as independent hard disk drives, or as a combined (spanned) single logical volume with no actual RAID functionality.
     
  18. FireWire2 macrumors 6502

    FireWire2

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    #18
    We used to say Earth is flat, that was wrong.
    Whatever in Wikipedia does not mean it correct, do you know that anyone can edit wikipedia? Do not believe what you read. Use common sense, it helps
    As I was asking what do you call multiple individual drives? JBoD
    A just a bunch of disks combine - already has name for it as BIG/SPAN or Concatenation
     
  19. matreya macrumors 65816

    matreya

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    Nov 14, 2009
    #19
    I'd rather trust Wikipedia, than some individual on a bulletin board. At least Wikipedia is reviewed by peers.

    All the wikipedia entry was saying is that JBOD refers to both individual and SPAN modes
     
  20. FireWire2 macrumors 6502

    FireWire2

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    Oct 12, 2008
    #20
    Read the Wikipedia agian :)
     
  21. matreya macrumors 65816

    matreya

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    Nov 14, 2009
    #21
    Congratulations, now you've defiled Wikipedia, you can be sooooo proud....

    The fact is that while I might prefer to refer to JBOD as independent drives only, the point has been made that JBOD is referred by others including manufacturers as also being a union of several drives into one volume.

    If you'd looked closer at the wikipedia page, you would have seen that there's been debate about the meaning of JBOD for years.
    --- Post Merged, Oct 6, 2016 ---
    Apple doesn't use the term JBOD in appleRAID, the 3 types of volume it creates is mirror (RAID1), stripe (RAID0) and concat (NRAID)
    --- Post Merged, Oct 6, 2016 ---
    Just out of curiosity, are you using a Thunderbolt dock? And are you putting the dock in the middle of the TB chain, between the iMac and the Thunderbay? If so, try putting the dock at the end of the chain.
     
  22. cvdave macrumors newbie

    cvdave

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2016
    #22
    gotta laugh... everyone is so convinced .... when the term defines itself

    JUST A BUNCH OF DISKS... is not nor does it infer access as if it were one unit..

    FYI.. the term has been in use for longer than WIkipedia has been in existance..... and don't believe everything your read on the internet.

    But you kiddies go on about your life thinking the earth is flat....
     

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