Judder effect becoming unbearable

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by Joe h, Mar 31, 2018.

  1. Joe h macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2017
    #1
    no idea where to post this, but it started with cbs, then Tbs during the ncaa tournament. Now it seems like every other network is affected. At first I thought it was just a poor link between dishnetwork and my local cbs station, but I’ve lately been noticing it on every tv, regardless if it is over the air, satellite, cable, or internet. The fire stick seems to be overriding my tv’s settings, and is producing the really awful soap opera effect. I’ve tried finding a compromise between juddering and soap opera with no success and I’m ready to pull the plug on the whole thing.

    Anyways, just wondering if others are experiencing this on a wide scale recently?
     
  2. DeltaMac macrumors G3

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #2
    Which do you prefer? Juddering? or the Soap Opera effect?
    I have to say that I don't have a clue what either of those are, but a compromise between those two effects does sound dreadful (at least judging by your distaste)
    So I can visualize that just a little, maybe you could describe both of those two "choices", if possible?
     
  3. macuser453787 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 19, 2012
    Location:
    Galatians 3:13-14
    #3
    If I may attempt to glean from what the OP said, it sounds like he may be changing his TV settings by turning off an ultra-high frame rate interpolation feature of the television in order to achieve a more film-like look with the video, but in doing so he is experiencing choppiness in the video known as judder that can sometimes be seen when a camera pans or tilts. IIRC, judder can happen when a video's native fps conflicts with a display device's different fps setting.

    The "soap opera effect" may be referring to what he is seeing when his TV's high frame rate (i.e. 120 Hz, aka 120 fps, aka 120 frame rate) interpolation feature is turned on, which can result in hyper-real, plastic-looking video.
     

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