Jumper set to Master or Slave

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by fossface, Jan 15, 2009.

  1. fossface macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2009
    #1
    Hello,

    I just was given a G4 that is not recognizing the Hard Drive. I was able to connect a drive through fire wire to load Tiger OS, but I still can't seem to figure out why I can't see the internal hard drive on the desktop or why it didn't pop up when asked where to install the OS. There is a hard drive there and it is connected, but how do I know which is the correct connection?

    By reading some other threads, I saw that someone asked if the Jumper was set to Master or Slave? If this is indeed something that this could be, how can I determine that?

    Thanks for any and all help. Obviously I'm a novice at this.

    FF
     
  2. sickmacdoc macrumors 68020

    sickmacdoc

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2008
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    #2
    On the rear of the drive you will see a series of "pins". Usually at least one pair of the pins needs to have a "jumper block" across them (which actually just connects the two pins electrically) to define a drive as Master, Slave or CS (Cable Select). There are some drives that function as Master if there are no jumpers attached.

    In most cases you will find the diagram of how the jumper(s) need to be set on the label of the drive. If not, then browse the drive manufacturer's website and find their information on jumper settings for their drives. When you have the drive set as Master (assuming it is the only hard drive you are planning to use that is- if you have two, one needs to be set as Master and one as Slave) plug it in and try it. If it still does not work, try the other connector on the ribbon cable, although that should not be necessary on your G4.

    EDIT: Of course if that doesn't work, there is always the possibility that the drive itself is dead as well.
     
  3. Shrapnel macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2002
    #3
    You can tell if the cable is a CS (Cable Select) one by looking at the three ATA connectors. On a CS cable one is usually blue, another grey, another black. I don't remember which is which though the cable should be labeled. If you are using a CS cable then the drive almost always needs to be set into CS mode. Though I have seen some drives work as long as they were configured for the port of the cable being plugged into.
     
  4. fossface thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2009
    #4
    Great, I will look for that on the back of the drive this weekend. Hopefully all will go well. I appreciate your help.

    FF
     

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