Just a Mac. Without the cheese, please.

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by madeinxyz, Feb 25, 2015.

  1. madeinxyz, Feb 25, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 25, 2015

    madeinxyz macrumors newbie

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    South Korea
    #1
    After over a year of using my Macbook Pro Retina 13" (Late 2013), here are a couple impassioned thoughts about my time with this product:

    Here is what I think. If you call yourself a pro, you better bring the power to up the ante.
    Don't act like a pro, if you can't handle pro things.

    My knight in shining armor, the effervescent Macbook Pro Retina 13", late 2013.
    When I bought it, I knew I bought something that promised long battery hours, better graphics performance, and an amazing display with unmatched detail. While most of the promises were kept, I soon realised that, whilst my new Macbook Pro Retina probably did outperform the previous generations of Macbook Pros in the same class, it wasn't really handling the tasks I was throwing at it pretty well.

    Now, some might think I am an idiot, rendering hyper complex scenes in Blender with gazillion polygons, UHD video files with 100+ effects layers and outputting 5x3m prints through Photoshop. No. Far from that. So very far.

    I am talking about the basic stuff.
    What is basic stuff? Looking at images (Admittedly, not just one, but many and some of them are in the higher resolution level....12mp. I don't ever want to think about 24mp or 36mp images.), using Lightroom for light editing and browsing (sometimes with approx. 5 windows open).
    Watching videos on Vimeo in HD has become a pain in the butt, too be quite frank. While watching, mostly it works well, but as soon as I re-scale the window or move it around, it looks like a slideshow and my Macbook "Pro" starts to bend its knees and go into a 'Forgive Me' position. I respond by saying: "My loyal knight. It's not your fault that they have given you the title 'Pro'. The king didn't know...or did he?"

    I understand Apple's crusade of simplification and the desire for minimalism. Thus, I also understand the move to cut down unnecessary product categories and the mission to focus on the things that really matter (Wait...did I just see a Apple Car outside my window?). What I don't understand is the decision to blatantly call this product a Macbook PRO whereas this, at best, is a perfectly reasonable Macbook. Yes, it has a unibody and it's made out of aluminium, But its performance certainly is NOT pro.

    Why did they do that? Increase sales? Make customers believe that they own something that only professionals use? Yes, I should have known better. My first Apple Laptop was an iBook. Then at some point, I owned the first Macbook Pro. Then came the unibodies. Then the Macbook disappeared.

    My previous Macbook Pro was a Quad Core 17" Macbook Pro and it was working like a beast. Next to my iMac Quad Core with 32gb ram, it was holding up pretty well. It calls itself 'Pro' and it does so rightfully. No doubt.

    At the end of the day, it was me, the long time Apple consumer, who didn't do enough research. Albeit admitting to my naiveté, I wish that Apple would bring back the Macbook without the 'Pro'. It just is a fairer and more truthful product category. I'm not saying that it doesn't deserve the 'Pro' label, it maybe just isn't there yet.

    Decrease the price, put a plastic shell around it and re-introduce the Macbook.

    I'm lovin' it, already. :)
     
  2. barkmonster macrumors 68020

    barkmonster

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Lancashire
    #2
    I think in general it should be: -

    Macbook Air 11"
    Macbook Air 13"
    Macbook 13"
    Macbook Pro 15"

    Calling anything with a dual core i5/i7 "Pro" isn't really honest.
     
  3. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #3
    Marketing nothing more nothing less, the MBP left the professional arena some years back. If a MBP meets your need as a "work" related Notebook as it does for me, it`s more coincidence than by design as the MBP is a consumer product not an enterprise level system or portable Workstation.

    This doesn't make them bad Notebooks, Apple is focused on thin & light, form over function and spinning how amazing they are. Apple want to sell as many units as possible and are very less interested niche markets that many professionals exist in...

    Q-6
     
  4. Samuelsan2001, Feb 25, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 25, 2015

    Samuelsan2001 macrumors 603

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    Oct 24, 2013
    #4
    The only part of that rant that made sense.

    As you so rightly point out swapping from a quad core beast to a dual core thin light laptop was not the right choice for you you should have known this....

    As for Pro it doesn't indicate anything it is just short for professional.

    This would be a perfect laptop for the majority of professional people running from meeting to meeting, working on trains and planes, doing presentations, coding and development, office tasks, running websites the list goes on and on.....

    So by that criteria it is certainly a PRO laptop, not your ridiculously narrow minded self important definition...
     
  5. madeinxyz thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Feb 25, 2015
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    South Korea
    #5
    @Samuelsan2001

    I'm glad something did make sense to you.
    There not that many sensible people in this world.
    I agree, that it probably is 'Pro' enough for many.

    In short: I believe that the Macbook without the Pro still has its place.

    As for your remarks about me being narrow minded and self important. Well, maybe we can meet half way, by you widening your mind too by understanding that there are people in your world that are just narrow minded and self important.
     
  6. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    #6
    Oh I like that

    and yes I do realise that that is the human condition in a nutshell....
     
  7. Barna Biro, Feb 25, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2015

    Barna Biro macrumors 6502a

    Barna Biro

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    Luzern, Switzerland
    #7
    Labels here and labels there... Bottom line is that certain machines perform certain tasks better than others and it is definitely not the machine's fault that the person purchasing it doesn't understand what his/hers needs require ( hardware-wise ). People should do their homeworks...

    I like the machine quite a bit and I can't care less about the label. It suits my professional needs perfectly ( I'm a software engineer ) and it does even more than that ( I'm not sure why your machine is lagging when playing videos or while performing light graphic editing on not too large files... I also do such things from time to time and I find it to perform just fine - by the way, I'm using the mid 2012 13" retina ).

    If you're keen on plastic and decreased price, then maybe look somewhere else ;) There are quite a few manufacturers eagerly waiting to try to please you... I'm Ok paying the price Apple asks because I know what I'm getting and why I'm getting it.

    If Apple ever switches back to plastic, it's the day when I'll switch from using their product as a primary machine.
     
  8. crsh1976 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2011
    #8
    I've had this issue for some time, whenever I'm trying to make my mind up on a notebook to purchase or one to recommend. The 13-inch rMBP has an awesome screen, but the innards make a weird impression for something totted around as "Pro".

    If Apple adds a retina screen to the MBA, the 13-inch rMBP has no reason to exist anymore because it doesn't offer considerably more power than a MBA and still doesn't have a dGPU (which to me is inexcusable).
     
  9. Barna Biro, Feb 25, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2015

    Barna Biro macrumors 6502a

    Barna Biro

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    #9
    Not everything is about GPU... for some people, CPU is just as important if not more important. For example: I can live with the integrated GPU, but I wouldn't be able to live with the MBA CPU... it would not be good enough for my needs ( not saying the 13" retina CPU is miles ahead, but it can be a significant difference when performing CPU intensive tasks - a quad-core would be even better BUT only if the given thing can actually utilize more than 2 cores... many things, still don't ). You're also forgetting about connectivity... sure, the 13" doesn't excel in connectivity either, but having that additional Thunderbolt port is still quite useful ( for some ).

    People need to learn to understand their needs before jumping on a product... I know it sounds simpler than it actually is, but it's what the majority are failing at... and then you see all these random, clueless figures bashing a completely Ok product simply because it turns out that it doesn't fit their needs. Yeah... It's definitely the product's fault for jumping into one's shopping cart and paying for itself with the person's money although it was very clear it won't be able to fit the needs... Makes sense, right? :rolleyes:
     
  10. crsh1976 macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 13, 2011
    #10
    Agreed, but Apple also needs to do a better job at giving their products a clearer identity/goal; the 13-inch rMBP cannot only be about the awesome screen when the rest of the innards don't follow and it's still sold as a "pro" product (where as the 15-inch model doesn't have that problem, IMO).
     
  11. David58117 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    #11
    OP - did you do a clean install of yosemite?

    I have the 2014 13" MBPr and don't have any lag watching videos or anything. Although the most "pro" use I have for it is recording in Logic..and I don't have any issues with that.
     
  12. inhalexhale1 macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 17, 2011
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    Ridgewood, NJ
    #12
    Wasn't the ad for the 13" Pro "for the pro in all of us?" Which is code for the average joe.

    ----------

    I agree. Maybe after the next update it'll be 12" Air, 13" MB, AND 15" MBP.
     
  13. RUGGLES99 macrumors 6502

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    Feb 9, 2015
    #13
    The "pro" attached to macbook is pure apple bs marketing, and its not shocking. Gm calls its suvs professiinal grade. The appliances we have in our kitchen just have a thin layer of stainless steel, so the manfacturers call the stove professional, etc. Its just bull but it works on consumers. I jut bought a mid 2010 used macbook pro in very fine condition, and its great for the price. I just find it mindboggling that people are paying more than $2000 for a 15" macbook pro. Crazy!
     
  14. Woochoo macrumors 6502

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    Oct 12, 2014
    #14
    This. I always said the 13" MBP shouldn't be called that since a MBA performs almost the same (the only big difference is the retina display). Only 15" MBP should be considered a Pro laptop.

    Well, if you take a look of the benchmarks, an i7 Air performs almost the same as a 13" MBP, and an i5 Air is not far from that. And benchmarks "exagerate" the difference in numbers since the real difference will be almost non existent in daily usage or heavy usage (unless you put it rendering things for hours).
     
  15. TechZeke macrumors 68020

    TechZeke

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    Jul 29, 2012
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    Rialto, CA
    #15
    First, "pro" is a vague ass term to begin with. There are Engineers doing AutoCAD on a Core 2 Duo with 4GB of RAM. A MacBook Air could be just a s much a 'Pro' machine as a 12-core Mac Pro.

    It is incorrect to assume that based on it not meeting your needs or expectations, that automatically means it's not 'Pro' machine. 'Pro' is just apple marketing term to differentiate it from the Airs, anyway. Using your reasoning, I could by a 6 core Mac Pro, have it too slow for my needs, then claim the 6 core Mac Pro isn't a 'Pro' machine.

    I'm not really sure what people are expecting from a 13" rMBP. It seems like people want the 13" to somehow magically have the internals of 15". For the size, I think the performance is quite good considering you also get the Iris Graphics.
     
  16. studIOS5 macrumors 6502a

    studIOS5

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    Oregon, OH
    #16
    Being a Computer Science major myself, I definitely agree with this post. Pro can be defined differently by nearly everyone. Pro was most definitely a term used to set it apart from the air. Apple computers are usually geared more towards creativity than raw "power" anyways. Based on that, I'd say the retina display alone makes it more "pro" for people that use their machines to view and edit photos and videos.
     
  17. Woochoo, Feb 25, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2015

    Woochoo macrumors 6502

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    #17
    Well, this is why some people complain about the "Pro" label. Your argument is also valid against calling the 13" "Pro".
    The easiest thing to do is to compare it against a MBA, which performs almost the same as I said a thousand times. Then, is up to you to decide if a retina screen is enough to call a laptop PRO, because this is the only difference from a MBA (appart from an extra thunderbolt port). Nothing else.
    So we shouldnt enter on the "what is a pro" debate (a subjective thing), and just compare Apple's different products which is a more objectieve thing.

    Well, the supplement "Air" can also be differentiated from "Macbook" just to let it clear it's lighter, there's no need for a "Pro" label in the 13" appart from marketing. 15" called Pro to differentiate it from 13", and Airs called that because they are lighter than the Macbook 13", that just would be fine. And for the same subjective rule you both use, why isn't the retina iMac called "Pro" if it has a monster-killer 5K display?
     
  18. studIOS5 macrumors 6502a

    studIOS5

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    #18
    I honestly think that pro is synonymous with a aluminum unibody construction and a black screen surround. I don't disagree that we could call the 13 inch model a "macbook" instead of a macbook pro, but its smart marketing to call them both pro's. When you walk into an apple store with buying a portable computer in mind, you'd rather have a choice wouldn't you? A specialist at the apple store can use verbiage like "Well we have the macbook PRO in two different sizes, 13 and 15 inch. With the 15 inch you're going to gain more power and screen real estate with the sacrifices of being both heavier and taking up more physical size in a bag (not to mention better battery on the 13 inch)." You're totally right, its a marketing term, but if you don't know why you need a 15 inch, chances are you don't need a 15 inch. When dropping thousands of dollars on a computer one should be responsible for looking into what they need out of said computer.
     
  19. kage207 macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 23, 2008
    #19
    It's a name. Why don't you do some research and see if it will meet your needs?
     

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