Just calibrated my MacBook Pro display...

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Random Gecko, Sep 1, 2010.

  1. Random Gecko macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Location:
    London, England
    #1
    And it ended up looking more blue? Not drastically but I notice it's not as "warm" as the stock setup so I was wondering if that was normal?

    It was the first time I've done it so I'll do it again in a bit to see if I can get it even more precise.

    Any tips for calibration? I've downloaded SuperCal but I haven't used it yet. Any better or worse than the stock OS X calibration tool?
     
  2. JasonHB macrumors regular

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    Jul 20, 2010
    Location:
    Warwickshire, UK
    #2
    I did mine and it seemed to take on a slightly more purple aspect to it.

    The whites are still white, but grey shades seem to be effected the most.

    Not sure if that is normal or not, maybe I need to try again.

    Jason
     
  3. arjen92 macrumors 65816

    arjen92

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    Sep 9, 2008
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    Below sea level
    #3
    It could be the room where you were. I think the best is to do it in an entirely dark room. That way, no other light will manipulate what you see.

    Why do you btw want to calibrate your screen? I'm happy with the stock setting.
     
  4. Mike225 macrumors 6502a

    Mike225

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    SF BAY
    #4
    Greys need to be neutral grey. Something is off


    You calibrate it to get true color reproduction. It's most essential for people who do printing and photo work.
     
  5. Random Gecko thread starter macrumors member

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    Sep 15, 2008
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    London, England
    #5
    Yeah, the greys are looking good now. When I go back and forth, the stock setting seems more yellowed. I take it that's normal?
     
  6. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    Oct 22, 2007
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    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #6
    Are doing the simple or the advanced calibration? Both start at the same place.

    External calibration uses a sensor on the screen to precisely measure the colour patches that the monitor is told to display. The internal calibration relies on your the accuracy of your eye.

    However, I have had good results with the internal calibration. Make sure the screen has been on for at least 1/2 hour (don't know if that is important with the LED versions). Work in subdued, neutral light if possible. So, not directly under a tungsten light.... not under fluorescents, etc. Not in a brightly painted room. The light that is surrounding the monitor will affect how your eyes perceive colour.

    Any adjustments made will immediately look "wrong" because your eyes have become used to the old colour. Eyes will tend to "perceive" anything that is close to white as being white. It takes a short time to adjust to a new white. Have something close by that truly is white to compare to the white on the monitor. And, monitors are transmitted colours and paper is reflected colours, so they will never totally match.
     
  7. Random Gecko thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Location:
    London, England
    #7
    Thanks for the info.

    Yeah, I did the advanced calibration and my whites seem closer to actual white now. It's not a huge difference but there is one, certainly. As I said above, it seems less yellowy. When I switch back to the stock setting for a few mins then go back to the newly calibrated setting it seems more blue :D

    Overall, I prefer my newly calibrated setting but I may re-do it to be sure it's bang on.
     
  8. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #8
    Glad to be of help. I have a slightly wonky lense in one eye. One eye tends to put a yellow tinge on everything. The other one is seems to be correct. I hardware calibration just to be safe :D .
     

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