Just downloaded some malware, what can I do?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Hieveryone, May 13, 2014.

  1. Hieveryone macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    #1
    I was browsing some sites (won't mention what kind) on Mavericks using Chrome, and all of a sudden it said my java is outdated and AUTOMATICALLY downloaded a file called "java_update" to my pen drive (I have it set to automatically download files to my pen drive not my SSD).

    I have Chromes phishing and malware protection on.

    I ran ClamXav, nothing detected.

    Then I booted into Windows 7, scanned the file with WebRoot and it said it was not a threat. Then I scanned my entire computer with WebRoot and it said no threats detected.

    Then I deleted the file while still logged into Windows.

    Now I'm stressed out because I know it's malware and am afraid something might be lurking on my computer on the Mac side which is where it got downloaded (or maybe even the Windows side for all I know).
     
  2. Saint.Icon macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 11, 2014
    #2
    Get a better porn site, for one. The file downloaded to your pen drive and you didn't open it (I assume, based on common sense), so remove the drive and consider it taken care of. If the drive is some high end, high storage drive, format it. If it's some $5 cheapy, toss it.
     
  3. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    #3
    I did some research. I DID NOT open the file. I think as long as I don't open it an let it execute I should be fine.

    Is that right?
     
  4. Saint.Icon macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 11, 2014
    #4
    Generally, yes. There are exceptions, of course, but you should be good.
     
  5. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    #5
    All right great. Is there any way I can make sure I'm clean?

    I ran ClamXav on Mac both on the entire computer plus the pen drive.

    I ran Malware Bytes and Webroot on Windows on the whole computer and the pen drive.

    Then I transferred all my pics and documents from the pen drive to the SSD on windows, reformatted the drive, then transferred my pics and docs back on the pen drive.

    Everything seems OK. Web pages aren't redirecting, no strange pop ups, no slow down, etc.
     
  6. Saint.Icon macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 11, 2014
    #6
    I'd say you're clean. Keep an eye out for anything strange, but from what you're describing it sounds pretty clear that you're in the clear.
     
  7. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    #7
    Great. This question may seem odd, but what is the main purpose of malware, spyware, and viruses?

    It's to sell you stuff right? Like you get popups like the Mac Defender asking you to pay some money or your web pages redirect to sites that want you to pay some money.

    I mean, they don't just sit their dormant for no reason I'd assume...why make one in the first place...
     
  8. Saint.Icon macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 11, 2014
    #8
    To sell you things. To take your info. To gain access to your accounts, etc. Basically all the stuff shady people do in real life, but digitized.
     
  9. 556fmjoe macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2014
    #9
    Malware is a lucrative and complicated business with a lot of parties involved.

    Hackers will exploit millions of systems and rent them out to spammers.

    Malware creators will write code and sell it to fraudsters.

    Fraudsters will buy the code from the malware guys and pay the spammers to send it to as many people as possible, usually in the hundreds of thousands or millions. The spammer gets a tiny payment per system that gets hit.

    The number of systems that actually provide a return is small. A handful of those millions of systems will provide the fraudster with a good bank account he can drain.

    Fraudster pockets the stolen money, pays the malware author who wrote the code, and pays the spammer who sent it to millions of computers. The spammer keeps a cut and pays the hacker who compromised the systems that he rented to the spammer.

    If anyone doesn't get paid, the offending party ends up being fish food off the coast of Murmansk.
     

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